hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Sumner 918 2 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 302 0 Browse Search
George S. Hillard 221 1 Browse Search
W. W. Story 176 0 Browse Search
William W. Story 154 0 Browse Search
France (France) 154 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 134 0 Browse Search
Simon Greenleaf 129 11 Browse Search
Francis Lieber 112 16 Browse Search
Jonathan French 98 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. Search the whole document.

Found 589 total hits in 309 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Charles Lee (search for this): chapter 2
entered Harvard, and, graduating with the class of 1771, became a clergyman. He maintained zealously the patriot cause during the Revolution. Taking with him his gun and surgical instruments, he rode on horseback to Bunker Hill and shared in the battle. While a clergyman, he was accustomed to receive students of the academy into his family. At the suggestion of Washington, when President, Colonel William Augustus Washington sent his two sons, Bushrod and Augustine, to the academy; and Charles Lee also sent the two sons of his deceased brother, Richard Henry Lee. The young Washingtons were received into the family of Rev. Mr. French. Memoir of Hon. Samuel Phillips, Ll.D, by Rev. John L. Taylor. Boston, 1856. pp. 253-256. Josiah Quincy was, from 1778 to 1786, an inmate of Mr. French's family, while pursuing his studies at the academy under Mr. Pemberton and his predecessor, Dr. Eliphalet Pearson, afterwards Hancock Professor at Harvard College. Life of Josiah Quincy, by his s
is address, Are we a nation, delivered Nov. 19, 1867: Works, Vol. XII. p. 249. It was then the fashion for aspiring youth to attempt verses after the style of Pope's grave and sonorous periods. But there was little of genuine inspiration in American poetry prior to the period which gave to it Bryant, Longfellow, Whittier, Hwho had been enlivening his theological studies, which he had pursued at Princeton, with the reading of Don Quixote, Cecilia, and other novels; Shakspeare, Ossian, Pope, and the Spectator; and admiring Belfield in Cecilia, and the character of Sancho, Esq. Remaining at Billerica but a short time, he obtained, through the influenced poems he had read, as Hogarth Moralized, Roberts' Epistle to a Young Gentleman on leaving Eton School, Masson's Elegy to a Young Nobleman leaving the University, Pope's Eloisa to Abelard, Goldsmith's Edwin and Angelina, Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad, and some pieces in Enfield's Speaker. Sumner did not persevere as a teacher.
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 2
l 1867; Rev. Dr. Leonard Woods; and John Pickering. Charles Sumner's tributes to Mr. Pickering are well known. Biographivigor losing from the aid they give. This is quoted by Charles Sumner at the close of his address, Are we a nation, deliverew, Whittier, Holmes, and Lowell. Leaving college, young Sumner accepted the place of an assistant in the Billerica Academ An intimate friendship had grown up in college between Sumner and Joseph Story, of Marblehead, who was two years his jund. Their letters are playful, and hopeful of the future. Sumner's letters refer to books and poems he had read, as Hogarth Pastoral Ballad, and some pieces in Enfield's Speaker. Sumner did not persevere as a teacher. In 1797-98 he passed nears, which made sharp divisions in society in those days. Mr. Sumner, in company with Richard Sullivan and Holder Slocum, waberal eye, seek private interest in the common weal. Mr. Sumner did not become actively interested in politics till 1803
e Judicial Court, he gave a dinner to the judges, the chaplain, and members of the bar and other gentlemen. He gathered, on these festive occasions, such guests as Chief Justices Parker and Shaw, Judges Prescott, Putnam, Wilde, Morton, Hubbard, Thacher, Simmons, Solicitor General Davis, Governor Lincoln, Josiah Quincy, John Pickering, Harrison Gray Otis, William Minot, Timothy Fuller, Samuel E. Sewall; and, among the clergy, Gardiner, Tuckerman, Greenwood, Pierpont, and Lyman Beecher. His son Charles, and his son's classmates, Hopkinson and Browne, were, once at least, among the youngest guests. He gave a dinner, in 1831, to surviving classmates; at which were present Pickering, Jackson, Thacher, Mason, and Dixwell. He made the duties and history of his office the subject of elaborate research. He read to the bar, and published in the American Jurist, July, 1829, a learned exposition of the points of difference between the office in England and in Massachusetts, stating clearl
John L. Taylor (search for this): chapter 2
de on horseback to Bunker Hill and shared in the battle. While a clergyman, he was accustomed to receive students of the academy into his family. At the suggestion of Washington, when President, Colonel William Augustus Washington sent his two sons, Bushrod and Augustine, to the academy; and Charles Lee also sent the two sons of his deceased brother, Richard Henry Lee. The young Washingtons were received into the family of Rev. Mr. French. Memoir of Hon. Samuel Phillips, Ll.D, by Rev. John L. Taylor. Boston, 1856. pp. 253-256. Josiah Quincy was, from 1778 to 1786, an inmate of Mr. French's family, while pursuing his studies at the academy under Mr. Pemberton and his predecessor, Dr. Eliphalet Pearson, afterwards Hancock Professor at Harvard College. Life of Josiah Quincy, by his son, Edmund Quincy, Boston, 1867, p. 26, where an account is given of Mr. French's family life. Mr. French has been commended for his fidelity and success as a Christian teacher. He died, July 28, 18
Samuel Putnam (search for this): chapter 2
ph Churchill. These well known names show his high standing in the confidence of the community. Mr. Sumner's home life, which before his appointment as sheriff had been regulated with severe economy, was now more generously maintained. Twice a year, at the opening of the Supreme Judicial Court, he gave a dinner to the judges, the chaplain, and members of the bar and other gentlemen. He gathered, on these festive occasions, such guests as Chief Justices Parker and Shaw, Judges Prescott, Putnam, Wilde, Morton, Hubbard, Thacher, Simmons, Solicitor General Davis, Governor Lincoln, Josiah Quincy, John Pickering, Harrison Gray Otis, William Minot, Timothy Fuller, Samuel E. Sewall; and, among the clergy, Gardiner, Tuckerman, Greenwood, Pierpont, and Lyman Beecher. His son Charles, and his son's classmates, Hopkinson and Browne, were, once at least, among the youngest guests. He gave a dinner, in 1831, to surviving classmates; at which were present Pickering, Jackson, Thacher, Mason, a
James S. Loring (search for this): chapter 2
he sterling qualities which children respect and imitate. If he was not himself great, he had in him elements of character which are essential to greatness. In person he was of average height, five feet and eight or nine inches. He was slender in form, and not well favored in countenance. No portrait of him is preserved. The papers left by Sheriff Sumner are the chief sources of this sketch. Information has been sought from those who knew him, and The Hundred Boston Orators, by James S. Loring, has been consulted. The mother. Mrs. Sumner was a woman of excellent sense, and of unusual skill in domestic economies. By her own toil, and the prudent management of the household, she succeeded, even before her husband became sheriff, in keeping the family expenses within his income. In the care of the estate and the nurture of the children, after his decease, she justified the confidence which his will placed in her. She was equable, even imperturbable, in her temperament.
nglish authorities and by reasons of public policy, with the view to obtain a reconsideration of the doctrine as held by the court. He failed to convince the judges; but his conclusion is in accord with the later authorities in other States, where it is held that the true owner, whose property an officer in good faith undertakes to seize, with a process against another, cannot lawfully obstruct or assault the officer, but must resort to a writ of replevin, or other civil remedy. State v. Donner, 8 Vermont Reports, 424; State v. Buchanan, 17 id. 573; State v. Fifield, 18 New Hampshire Reports, 34; Faris v. State, 3 Ohio State Reports, 159. Sheriff Sumner performed his duties with scrupulous fidelity and exactness. His fearlessness was remarked on the occasion of the riot in Broad Street, June 11, 1837, between the Irish and an engine company, when under the statute it became his duty to read the riot act. In the latter part of his life the perplexities of his office annoyed him
Jullien Paris (search for this): chapter 2
He developed in his youth the spirit of adventure; and, at the age of twenty-one, sailed as the supercargo of a ship for Russia, where he received many civilities from the Czar Nicholas and his court. From this time until 1852, he travelled, without the interval of any visit to his country, in the East and in Europe; studying languages, politics, and institutions, observing with rare diligence contemporary events, and profiting by a large acquaintance with scholars and public men. He made Paris his home, and knew French affairs well,—better, probably, than most Frenchmen. He was commended both by Tocqueville and Alexander von Humboldt for his intelligence and researches. During his residence abroad, he contributed to foreign reviews, and also to American periodicals and newspapers. His themes concerned history, philanthropy, and the existing state of nations, including affairs in the East. After his return to this country, he was, for some years, an acceptable lecturer before
Tocqueville (search for this): chapter 2
ship for Russia, where he received many civilities from the Czar Nicholas and his court. From this time until 1852, he travelled, without the interval of any visit to his country, in the East and in Europe; studying languages, politics, and institutions, observing with rare diligence contemporary events, and profiting by a large acquaintance with scholars and public men. He made Paris his home, and knew French affairs well,—better, probably, than most Frenchmen. He was commended both by Tocqueville and Alexander von Humboldt for his intelligence and researches. During his residence abroad, he contributed to foreign reviews, and also to American periodicals and newspapers. His themes concerned history, philanthropy, and the existing state of nations, including affairs in the East. After his return to this country, he was, for some years, an acceptable lecturer before lyceums in the Western as well as Eastern States. On July 4, 1859, he delivered the oration before the municipal
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...