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Milton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
was highly gratified to know the author of that article on Milton, which he says is the ablest and truest appreciation of Milton's character ever published, Ante,Vol. II. p. 47. entirely beating Macaulay's or Dr. Channing's. Parkes wishes me to take to Emerson the copy of Milton edited by himself in 1826 (Pickering's edition). He has a collection of upwards of one hundred works about Milton, Among the souvenirs which Sumner purchased during his visit to Europe in 1858-59, the one which he pMilton, Among the souvenirs which Sumner purchased during his visit to Europe in 1858-59, the one which he prized most and showed frequently to visitors was the Album of Camillus Cardoyn, a Neapolitan nobleman, who collected during his residence at Geneva, 1608-1640, the autographs of distinguished persons passing through that city. One of these was the E that I have heard them represented, I think that an Italian tour to see pictures might almost expose one to that line of Milton about the Crusaders, that strayed so far to seek In Golgotha Him dead, who lives in Heaven. And you are still firmer
China (China) (search for this): chapter 16
e was defeated by M. Cormenin, 1788-1868; a Deputy of the Liberal party, author of political pamphlets in its support, but finally deserting it after the coup daetatof Dec., 1851. whose pamphlet was written as with the point of a sword. Then there is Russia, just advancing her southern boundary south of the Aral Sea and to the east of the Caspian, so as to square with that on the west of the latter sea, and bring her down to Persia and nearer India. She has formally declared war against China, and her troops are doubtless now in possession of that territory. Here is ground for jealousy and misunderstanding on the part of England, whose public men view Russian movements with an interest which will be incomprehensible to you in America. I once heard Edward Ellice say, If we do go to war with her, we will break her to pieces,—a very vain speech, though from the lips of an ancient Minister of War. England could hurt Russia very little, and Russia England very little, though against
Munich (Bavaria, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
ed Innsbruck on the morning of the ninth. After a week at Munich, he went to Passau, thence in a small boat down the Danube honor abroad. Letters. To George S. Hillard. Munich, Oct. 18, 1839. dear Hillard,—The day after I wrote you in his own carriage, urged me to take a place with him to Munich,—a distance of nearly five hundred miles. This luxury of tg Hungarians played. After one day at Innsbruck, left for Munich,—a day and a night. In the malle-postefound a very pleasarret. Vienna, Oct. 26. At length in Vienna. Left Munich in the eilwagen Stage-coach. for Passau; rode a day and. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, e present. As ever, C. S To George W. Greene, Rome. Munich, Oct. 18, 1839. Part of a letter begun in Italy. An dwarfs all that I have ever seen of the kind in America. Munich is a nice place. The king is a great patron of art. His g<
Venice (Italy) (search for this): chapter 16
be most cordially and heartily welcomed by all. Boston takes a sort of pride in you, and feels that you have done her honor abroad. Letters. To George S. Hillard. Munich, Oct. 18, 1839. dear Hillard,—The day after I wrote you from Venice I inscribed my name for a place in the malle-postefor that evening as far as Milan. We started at eight o'clock; it poured down cataracts: my companions, a countess, and an honest father with his son, a boy of fourteen, going to a school in Switt respect of you. (to whom I sent a letter for Webster), who says he was much struck by him; there seemed to be a colossal placidity about him. All appear to think him reserved and not a conversationist. Creswell told Sumner, when they met at Venice, that Webster was thought very reserved and solemn. Sydney Smith calls him the Great Western. My friend Parkes, whom I encountered with his family at Munich, says that his friends, such as Charles Austin and Grote, were disappointed in his attai
Potsdam (Brandenburg, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
—though I have not seen either there. The other professors do not enter that circle. Most of the corps diplomatiqueand the Ministers I know already; and I have been well received by the Crown Prince, and the Prince William, and their princesses. Frederick William III. was then King of Prussia. He was born Aug. 3, 1770, succeeded to the throne Nov. 16, 1797, and died June 7, 1840. The Crown Prince was his son, Frederick William IV., who was born Oct. 15, 1795, and died at Sans-Souci, Potsdam, Jan. 2, 1861. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Maximilian, of Bavaria. Prince William, brother of Frederick William IV., and now Emperor of Germany, was born March 22, 1797, and succeeded on his brother's death to the throne. He married, in 1829, a daughter of the Grand Duke Charles Frederick, of Saxe-Weimar. The Crown Prince, who seems bon garcon,inquired about our summers: he thought they must be magnificent. I told him I thought so, till I had been in Italy. He asked me if Boston
Muskau (Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
Princess William spoke of him to me in the most flattering terms. This society is pleasant to enter, as I do, for a few times, and with the excitement of novelty; but I think I could not endure it a whole season. The presence of the Royal Princess is too genante;and then, all is formality and etiquette. I have seen here some very pretty women, —some of the prettiest I have ever met; two of them young princesses, the nieces of Puckler-Muskau. Puckler-Muskau, a prince and author, born at Muskau, Lusatia, in 1785, and died at Branitz, near Kottbus. Feb. 4, 1871. He was the author of books of travel in Europe and the East. Bad, however, as the society is, I should prefer it before Vienna, where aristocracy has its most select home. Personally, I can bear very slight testimony on this subject, as I left Vienna the week the season commenced. I was, however, at Prince Metternich's, where I saw the highest and proudest. Princess Metternich is thought very beautiful. I do not think
Vienna, Ill. (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
of the well I must throw the magic rod. Tell Crawford to write me. I rely much for my future happiness upon my friends in Europe. Don't let me lose the vision of Rome and of art! Who has ordered the Orpheus? I hope you have knocked away those books on which I stand. Reference to books carved under his bust. Remember me to Mrs. Greene, la petitePonto, Pasquali, A servant of Mr. Greene. and all. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. P. S. Have you received my letter from Vienna? Always acknowledge the receipt of letters by the date. See Madame de Sevigne, J'ai recu la votre, &c. To his brother George. Berlin, Jan. 8, 1840. my dear George, His brother was then at Malta, on his way to Italy.—.. Do not fail to study art. Greene will be your mentor about this. Make yourself a master of the principles of taste with regard to sculpture, and understand the characteristics of all the great schools of painting. Read Sir Joshua Reynolds's lectures; Flaxman's; De
Gotha (Thuringia, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
of regret; but none of them like me has lost a faithful ally and a sympathizing companion. Leaving Berlin, Jan. 9, 1840, he went by the way of Leipsic, Weimar, Gotha, and Frankfort to Heidelberg, where he remained five weeks, enjoying the society of its celebrated professors, particularly of Mittermaier, who awaited with much my own, I value beyond price that of my friends. February 11. Left Berlin in the middle of January, cold as the North Pole, and passed to Leipsic, to Weimar, Gotha, Frankfort, and Heidelberg; for a day and night was shut up in the carriage with four Jews, one a great Rabbi with a tremendous beard. I heard their views about ternich, who praised my country very much (!); Dresden, Berlin, and most of the interesting people there, among whom was a kinsman of yours, Henry Howard; Leipsic, Gotha, and the Ducal Palace; Frankfort, Heidelberg, where I am now enjoying the simplicity of German life unadulterated by fashionable and diplomatic intercourse. I lea
Vienna (Wien, Austria) (search for this): chapter 16
e Danube to Linz, and by carriage from Linz to Vienna, where he arrived on the twenty-fifth. Here hrney for conversations with his friends. From Vienna he wrote to his mother, urging that his brotheVivian Grey was not written in a garret. Vienna, Oct. 26. At length in Vienna. Left MunichVienna. Left Munich in the eilwagen Stage-coach. for Passau; rode a day and night. At Passau, with an English frienorhood of Odessa. At Linz took a carriage for Vienna,—two days and a half,—where I arrived yesterda than the poetry. To Henry W. Longfellow. Vienna, Nov. 10, 1839. dear Henry,—. . . I shall s, as the society is, I should prefer it before Vienna, where aristocracy has its most select home. ath of Mrs. Clay, the wife of our Secretary at Vienna, J. Randolph Clay, afterwards Minister to Pn each other during their brief intercourse in Vienna. whom I came to know quite well during my stayour delightful letter of August 13 found me at Vienna, fairly escaped from the fascinations of Italy[3 more...
Dresden (Saxony, Germany) (search for this): chapter 16
eived by Prince Metternich in his salon. Thence, after brief pauses at Prague, Dresden, and Leipsic, He went from Dresden to Leipsic by railway, probably his onlyDresden to Leipsic by railway, probably his only travelling by railway n the Continent. he visited Berlin, where he remained five weeks. Here he saw much of society, and conversed with the celebrated savans,Humbolt towers, and the palace of the Bohemian kings. Then another night and day to Dresden, where I thought of Italy as I looked upon the beautiful paintings; then to Lend in 1848 became the Superintendent of the Astor Library. has just arrived at Dresden. I have not seen him; but he speaks of Hyperion as one of the best books thatth which perhaps you are acquainted. Cogswell has come abroad again; he is at Dresden now. His mission was two-fold; to establish a grandson of Astor at one of the f Germany,—Vienna and Prince Metternich, who praised my country very much (!); Dresden, Berlin, and most of the interesting people there, among whom was a kinsman of
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