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pieces here, flagon, chalice and paten. On the under side of each is written, The gift of K William and Q Mary to ye Rev'd Samuel Myles for ye use of their Maj'ities Chapell in N. England-1694. Mr. Batchelder, who gives these facts about the service, adds also that it is used only on especial occasions. There is another silver service and one of gold (the Foote memorial). The silver basin given by Mrs. Grizzel Apthorp is used as the chief alms basin. A silver service given in 1791 by Mrs. Bethune, (laughter of Benjamin Faneuil, is used for communion-alms. The original parchment parish-register dating back to 1759 is preserved by the church. Between Christ Church and the First Parish Church lies the old peaceful graveyard, ablaze in autumn with golden-rod. The yard is fully two hundred and sixty-four years old, and had been used about one hundred and thirty years before Christ Church was built. Here lie Stephen Day, first printer of this continent north of Mexico; Elijah Corl
Nathaniel Eaton (search for this): chapter 7
rishing ministry of Mr. Tho. Shepheard. Twelve important men of the colony were chosen to take orders for the college, and of these were Shepard, Cotton, Wilson, Harlakenden, Stoughton, Dudley and Winthrop. Thus from the first, college interests were closely linked to those of the First Church. Church and State were one in those days; Christo et Ecclesiae was the college motto. In 1638 Newtowne became Cambridge, and the same year the college was called Harvard. Its first leader, Nathaniel Eaton, for maltreating his pupils was dismissed, and for a time Samuel Shepard administered the college affairs. In 1664, however, Henry Dunster became president. He was a member of Shepard Church, as was also Elijah Corlet, master of the Faire Grammar School, on the site of which the Washington Grammar School now stands. In 1642 the first college commencement was held in the First Church. In 1649 a new church was erected on nearly the present site of Dane Hall at Harvard Square. In thi
Arthur Gilman (search for this): chapter 7
tten this brief account and now send it forth, with all its imperfections thick upon it, trusting it will lead someone else to seek out the history and grow to love stories of Cambridge as do I, to whom its dust is dear. For assistance in preparing the facts contained in this article I am indebted to the courtesy of the Rev. William B. King and Dr. McKenzie. I have also learned much from the following authorities: History of Shepard Church, Dr. McKenzie; The Cambridge of 1776, by Mr. Arthur Gilman; Harvard and its Surroundings, Mr. Moses King; Christ Church, Cambridge, Mr. S. F. Batchelder, and from other works of a like nature. Maples in autumn. How fairly shows yon distant maple, shedding Its blood-red leaves upon the forest ground, Those very leaves that not long since were wedding The young spring breeze with modest rustling sound! Its yearly tribute done, 'twill be left standing To wrestle naked with the winter breeze, And, by such change deciduous, grow commanding And
ished in Cambridge; for two reasons was it placed here: because the town was conveniently situated and because it was here under the orthodox and soul-flourishing ministry of Mr. Tho. Shepheard. Twelve important men of the colony were chosen to take orders for the college, and of these were Shepard, Cotton, Wilson, Harlakenden, Stoughton, Dudley and Winthrop. Thus from the first, college interests were closely linked to those of the First Church. Church and State were one in those days; Christo et Ecclesiae was the college motto. In 1638 Newtowne became Cambridge, and the same year the college was called Harvard. Its first leader, Nathaniel Eaton, for maltreating his pupils was dismissed, and for a time Samuel Shepard administered the college affairs. In 1664, however, Henry Dunster became president. He was a member of Shepard Church, as was also Elijah Corlet, master of the Faire Grammar School, on the site of which the Washington Grammar School now stands. In 1642 the fir
John Leverett (search for this): chapter 7
d is fully two hundred and sixty-four years old, and had been used about one hundred and thirty years before Christ Church was built. Here lie Stephen Day, first printer of this continent north of Mexico; Elijah Corlet, first master of the Faire Grammar School; Thomas Shepard, first pastor in Cambridge; also Jonathan Mitchell, Nathaniel Gookin, William Brattle, Thomas Hilliard, and Mr. Appleton; and of the Harvard presidents, Dunster, Chauncy (on whose tomb is a Latin inscription), Oakes, Leverett, Wadsworth, Holyoke, Willard and Webber. Here are also Governor Belcher, Judge Remington, Mrs. Brattle; and under Christ Church is the old Vassall tomb, containing ten coffins-those of the family and also one of the black servants of the family, and one probably of Lieutenant Brown, the English officer who was shot by a sentry. In the yard stands a monument erected to the memory of Mr. Hicks, Moses Richardson and William Marcy, who fell April 19,at Lexington. An interesting bit of the gr
Jonathan Belcher (search for this): chapter 7
out one hundred and thirty years before Christ Church was built. Here lie Stephen Day, first printer of this continent north of Mexico; Elijah Corlet, first master of the Faire Grammar School; Thomas Shepard, first pastor in Cambridge; also Jonathan Mitchell, Nathaniel Gookin, William Brattle, Thomas Hilliard, and Mr. Appleton; and of the Harvard presidents, Dunster, Chauncy (on whose tomb is a Latin inscription), Oakes, Leverett, Wadsworth, Holyoke, Willard and Webber. Here are also Governor Belcher, Judge Remington, Mrs. Brattle; and under Christ Church is the old Vassall tomb, containing ten coffins-those of the family and also one of the black servants of the family, and one probably of Lieutenant Brown, the English officer who was shot by a sentry. In the yard stands a monument erected to the memory of Mr. Hicks, Moses Richardson and William Marcy, who fell April 19,at Lexington. An interesting bit of the graveyard's history is that here, in July, 1775, the tombs were reft of
Alexander Mckenzie (search for this): chapter 7
unded. There are many records of this time, preserved partly in Mr. Shepard's own handwriting, in a book possessed by Dr. McKenzie. In Shepard's time came the troubles over Mrs. Anne Hutchinson and her heresies, settled by a synod held in this ch37. After him came Nehemiah Adams, and in 1835, Rev. John Albro, who remained thirty years. After his death came Dr. Alexander McKenzie, who has ably led the people and kept close the ancient connection between the church and the college. We turnistance in preparing the facts contained in this article I am indebted to the courtesy of the Rev. William B. King and Dr. McKenzie. I have also learned much from the following authorities: History of Shepard Church, Dr. McKenzie; The Cambridge of 1Dr. McKenzie; The Cambridge of 1776, by Mr. Arthur Gilman; Harvard and its Surroundings, Mr. Moses King; Christ Church, Cambridge, Mr. S. F. Batchelder, and from other works of a like nature. Maples in autumn. How fairly shows yon distant maple, shedding Its blood-red leaves u
Stoughton (search for this): chapter 7
ie. In Shepard's time came the troubles over Mrs. Anne Hutchinson and her heresies, settled by a synod held in this church. In 1636 Harvard College was established in Cambridge; for two reasons was it placed here: because the town was conveniently situated and because it was here under the orthodox and soul-flourishing ministry of Mr. Tho. Shepheard. Twelve important men of the colony were chosen to take orders for the college, and of these were Shepard, Cotton, Wilson, Harlakenden, Stoughton, Dudley and Winthrop. Thus from the first, college interests were closely linked to those of the First Church. Church and State were one in those days; Christo et Ecclesiae was the college motto. In 1638 Newtowne became Cambridge, and the same year the college was called Harvard. Its first leader, Nathaniel Eaton, for maltreating his pupils was dismissed, and for a time Samuel Shepard administered the college affairs. In 1664, however, Henry Dunster became president. He was a memb
ce, and gave a form of prayer which he had written in place of the one for the king. In June, 1777, when British and Hessian troops were quartered here, after Burgoyne's capitulation, Lieut. Richard Brown of the Seventy-first English regiment was shot by a sentry. He was buried under Christ Church, probably in the Vassall tomb until the Revolution. Then General Putnam took it for the headquarters of the Connecticut troops, and it was so used until the Battle of Bunker Hill. Next General Burgoyne was placed there for safe keeping. It is now owned by the daughters of Doctor Plympton, in whose family it has been for over one hundred years. The house ish tiles, and a fireback representing Britannia. The balusters of the staircase are beautifully carved by hand. In the second story chamber once occupied by General Burgoyne, the walls are panelled and covered with landscape paper. On the front door are a huge brass knocker and lock, while the iron key is sufficiently ponderous
N. England (search for this): chapter 7
sovereigns. These pieces were used there up to 1772, when Thomas Hutchinson became governor. He was given the crown communion plate and the pulpit furniture to distribute. The new set of plate went to King's Chapel, and the old was divided between a church at Newburyport and Christ Church here. There are three pieces here, flagon, chalice and paten. On the under side of each is written, The gift of K William and Q Mary to ye Rev'd Samuel Myles for ye use of their Maj'ities Chapell in N. England-1694. Mr. Batchelder, who gives these facts about the service, adds also that it is used only on especial occasions. There is another silver service and one of gold (the Foote memorial). The silver basin given by Mrs. Grizzel Apthorp is used as the chief alms basin. A silver service given in 1791 by Mrs. Bethune, (laughter of Benjamin Faneuil, is used for communion-alms. The original parchment parish-register dating back to 1759 is preserved by the church. Between Christ Church and
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