hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Stonewall Jackson 1,296 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 788 0 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 718 4 Browse Search
James Longstreet 581 1 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 529 1 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 513 5 Browse Search
Richard S. Ewell 426 4 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 410 4 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 362 0 Browse Search
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) 361 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

Found 366 total hits in 116 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
E. D. Baker (search for this): chapter 11
des of Gens. W. A. Gorman and F. W. Lander and Col. E. D. Baker, was located at Poolesville, 8 miles north of midnight of the 20th, was part of the command of Colonel Baker, some 300 men under Col. Charles Devens, of the remain, and sent back to his brigade commander, Colonel Baker, for reinforcements. The latter consulted his dck to the bluff at about 2 p. m., where he found Colonel Baker, who directed him to form his regiment on the riht of the position that he proposed to occupy, while Baker placed 300 of the Twentieth Massachusetts on the lefto make a demonstration on Evans' right, leaving Colonel Baker in command at Ball's bluff. Stone then telegrape, and our troops appear to be advancing there under Baker. The left, under Gorman, has advanced its skirmishe guns. Shortly after the action became general, Colonel Baker, passing in front of his command, was killed by of the Forty-second New York, who had succeeded Colonel Baker in command. He said a retreat down the bluff an
Milton Cogswell (search for this): chapter 11
s. Shortly after the action became general, Colonel Baker, passing in front of his command, was killed by a sharpshooter, which so demoralized the Federals that the surviving officers conferred and decided to retreat. This was opposed by Col. Milton Cogswell, of the Forty-second New York, who had succeeded Colonel Baker in command. He said a retreat down the bluff and across the river was now impossible, and that they must cut their way through the Confederate right to Edwards' ferry. He proalifornia regiment, but not by the others. He was quickly driven back and the whole Federal command was forced to the river bluff in great disorder. Just then two companies of the Forty-second New York landed on the Virginia shore. These Colonel Cogswell ordered up the bluff and deployed as skirmishers to cover the Federal retreat, while he advanced to the left with a small party, and was almost immediately captured. Colonel Devens escaped by swimming the river. On the morning of the 22d
Everard Meade (search for this): chapter 11
expected attack from General McCall, the next morning, Sunday, October 20th, as it had been reported that the Federal advance was moving in force from Dranesville toward Leesburg. Evans' scouts captured McCall's courier bearing dispatches to General Meade, directing him to examine the roads leading to Leesburg. The Federal batteries kept up a deliberate fire during the day, but no assault was made. On the morning of the 20th the Federal signal officer on Sugar Loaf mountain, in Maryland, rd, and a stubborn fight resulted. When the action had lasted about two hours, Stuart reported, I found that the enemy, being already in force larger than my own, was recovering from his disorder, and receiving heavy reinforcements [Reynolds' and Meade's brigades]. Consequently he withdrew in order. The enemy was evidently too much crippled to follow in pursuit, and after a short halt at the railroad I proceeded to Fryingpan church, where the wounded were cared for. Early next morning, wit
nd Capt. A. L. Pitzer's Virginia cavalry, moved toward Dranesville for the purpose of protecting an expedition of army wagons after hay. At the same time a Federal expedition approached Dranesville, on a similar mission. Upon discovering the presence of the enemy, Stuart sent Pitzer to keep between them and the wagons, and order the latter back, while the main body was disposed for a vigorous attack upon the Federal rear and left flank. The force Stuart encountered at Dranesville was E. O.C. Ord's Pennsylvania brigade of five regiments (including the Bucktails), two squadrons of cavalry and Easton's battery. Stuart took position, screening his infantry in a wood, and when the enemy came up the action was opened by an artillery combat. Then Stuart ordered forward his right wing, and the Alabama regiment rushed with a shout in a storm of bullets. Colonel Forney fell wounded, and Lieut.-Col. J. B. Martin was killed. The other regiments also pushed forward, and a stubborn fight resu
Charles Devens (search for this): chapter 11
command of Colonel Baker, some 300 men under Col. Charles Devens, of the Fifteenth Massachusetts. Its object the Virginia side, to protect the Federal return. Devens, at daybreak, pushed forward with a few men to reco of Leesburg. Thinking he had not been discovered, Devens determined to remain, and sent back to his brigade l Stone, and obtained permission to either withdraw Devens or to send over reinforcements to him. He promptly directed Devens to hold his position and said that he would support him, in person, with the rest of his briga entirely inadequate, and it was nearly noon before Devens' regiment of 625 men was closed up on the Virginia ed in his front, and apprehensive of being flanked, Devens retired his regiment to an open space in the woods,eive an attack. To ascertain about reinforcements, Devens went back to the bluff at about 2 p. m., where he fll party, and was almost immediately captured. Colonel Devens escaped by swimming the river. On the mornin
John B. Gordon (search for this): chapter 11
Gen. S. G. French, stationed at Evansport, reported on December 15th that his position had been under fire from Federal batteries on the Maryland shore during the past three weeks. On December 20th Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, with a force comprising the Eleventh Virginia, Col. Samuel Garland; Sixth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Secrest; Tenth Alabama, Col. J. H. Forney, and First Kentucky, Col. T. H. Taylor, in all 1,600 infantry; Capt. A. S. Cutts' Georgia artillery (four pieces), Maj. J. B. Gordon's North Carolina cavalry, and Capt. A. L. Pitzer's Virginia cavalry, moved toward Dranesville for the purpose of protecting an expedition of army wagons after hay. At the same time a Federal expedition approached Dranesville, on a similar mission. Upon discovering the presence of the enemy, Stuart sent Pitzer to keep between them and the wagons, and order the latter back, while the main body was disposed for a vigorous attack upon the Federal rear and left flank. The force Stuart en
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 11
to the same place, and these were organized into the Seventh brigade of the Confederate army of the Potomac, which, early in August, was put under command of Brig.-Gen. Nathan G. Evans, who had been promoted for his brave conduct July 21st. General Beauregard's object in locating this strong force at Leesburg was to guard his left flank from a Federal attack by way of several good roads that led from the fords of the upper Potomac, near that town, directly to his Bull run encampment; to watch thre, on the Federal side, 7 killed and 61 wounded; on the Confederate, 43 killed, 143 wounded and 8 missing. The return of the department of Northern Virginia, Gen. J. E. Johnston commanding, for December, showed for the Potomac district, General Beauregard, aggregate infantry, cavalry and artillery, present and absent, 68,047; aggregate present, 55,165; effective total, 44,563. The forces in the Valley district, General Jackson, were reported at 12,922 present; in the Aquia district, General
H. H. Lockwood (search for this): chapter 11
14th of November, General Dix, commanding the department of Pennsylvania, with headquarters at Baltimore, ordered Gen. H. H. Lockwood, commanding the Federal peninsula brigade, partly composed of Union Marylanders, to proceed on an expedition througilance to preserve discipline and prevent any outrage upon persons or property. In the course of his instructions to Lockwood, Dix proceeded to settle grave questions of state by military instructions. He advised that The people, if they return ation; and stated that he had sent 4,500 men on this expedition. Reaching the borders of Virginia, November 16th, General Lockwood sent a flag of truce to the Confederate troops, some 10 miles below the line, but found no force to treat with, as tearer of this flag reported, from Temperanceville, We have thus far had a triumphant welcome and uninterrupted march. Lockwood reported from Drummondtown, on the 22d, that the larger portion of his command was at that place, but he had sent two re
S. G. French (search for this): chapter 11
n of Pennsylvania cavalry, on a reconnoissance to Vienna, was attacked by 120 men of the First North Carolina cavalry, under Col. Robert Ransom, and stampeded. Ransom reported the capture of 26 prisoners, and a considerable number of horses, sabers and carbines. The attention of the government was invited to these successful affairs by General Johnston. Skirmishes followed, of like character, near Dranesville on the 26th, near Fairfax on the 27th, and at Annandale, December 2d. Gen. S. G. French, stationed at Evansport, reported on December 15th that his position had been under fire from Federal batteries on the Maryland shore during the past three weeks. On December 20th Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, with a force comprising the Eleventh Virginia, Col. Samuel Garland; Sixth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Secrest; Tenth Alabama, Col. J. H. Forney, and First Kentucky, Col. T. H. Taylor, in all 1,600 infantry; Capt. A. S. Cutts' Georgia artillery (four pieces), Maj. J. B. Gordon's
Charles P. Stone (search for this): chapter 11
opposite side of the Potomac; to keep up a connection with the Confederate force in the lower Shenandoah valley by a good turnpike that led from Leesburg across the Blue ridge, and to save for his army the abundant supplies of the fertile county of Loudoun. On the 15th of October General Banks' division of the Federal army was located at Darnestown, Md., about 15 miles due east from Leesburg, with detachments at Point of Rocks, Sandy Hook, Williamsport, etc.; while the division of Brig.-Gen. C. P. Stone, composed of six companies of cavalry, three of artillery, and the infantry brigades of Gens. W. A. Gorman and F. W. Lander and Col. E. D. Baker, was located at Poolesville, 8 miles north of east from Leesburg. The object in this disposition of so large a force was, not only to guard the right of the big Federal army that General McClellan was gathering at Washington, but especially to cover the important approaches from the northwest to Baltimore and the Federal city, particularly
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...