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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

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John Q. Burbridge (search for this): chapter 6
he enemy in check until his infantry and artillery could come up. These were forming, and they came up the hill with a rush. First came Slack, with Hughes' regiment and Thornton's battalion, and formed on the left of Cawthorn; then Clark, with Burbridge's regiment, and formed on the left of Slack; then Parsons, with Kelly's regiment and Guibor's battery, and formed on the left of Clark, and on the extreme left of the line McBride took position with his two regiments. Shortly after Rives, withwas borne to the rear dying; Cawthorn and his adjutant were mortally wounded; Slack was desperately wounded; Clark was shot in the leg; Col. Ben Brown was killed; Colonel Allen, of General Price's staff, was killed by the side of his chief; Colonels Burbridge, Kelly, Foster and numerous field officers were disabled. But Lyon was worse hurt than Price. He had, however, risked everything on the chance, and in the shadow of impending defeat was determined to make a supreme effort to reverse the t
Claiborne F. Jackson (search for this): chapter 6
ered Missouri with Churchill's mounted Confederate regiment, Gratiot's Arkansas infantry, Carroll's mounted regiment and Woodruff's battery; reached Price's camp the same day, were joined by him, and continued their march northward to rescue Governor Jackson and his party. Under the impression that the governor was pressed by Lyon on one side and Sigel on the other, McCulloch left his infantry behind, and he and Price pressed forward to his relief. On approaching Neosho, McCulloch sent Churchiral Price's staff, except his adjutant-general, Colonel Henry Little, were civilians, and knew nothing of the military duties their position imposed upon them. But they were willing and learned rapidly. The Granby mines furnished lead, and Governor Jackson's forethought had provided a supply of powder. Some artillery ammunition captured served as a pattern, and the cannoneers were soon able to make the necessary ammunition for their guns. Notwithstanding the embarrassments and drawbacks, the
Nathaniel Lyon (search for this): chapter 6
nd, accompanied Steen's division. As soon as Lyon reached Springfield he began writing and sendiney never reached there. It was a question with Lyon whether to fight or retreat, and the first altepture every one coming or going, and waited for Lyon to begin the fight. Lyon halted in sight of Raas the first intimation either of them had that Lyon and his army were upon them. McCulloch discredrst sound of Totten's guns had opened a fire on Lyon which retarded his advance and greatly aided the nearly equal. Price had about 3,500 men, and Lyon, deducting the 1,500 under Sigel, had about 3,5gether. Instead of advancing, Price waited for Lyon to attack. He did not have to wait long. In ase who were near him that if he were as slim as Lyon the bullet would not have hit him. Weightman waand numerous field officers were disabled. But Lyon was worse hurt than Price. He had, however, ris dead. In the pause that occurred following Lyon's death, Price was reinforced by Dockery's Arka[13 more...]
T. H. Rosser (search for this): chapter 6
nding position, his infantry extended on both sides of the road, and a company of regular cavalry was on each flank. He was quietly awaiting results. After the affair with Plummer, McCulloch went in search of him. He took his own infantry, with Rosser's and O'Kane's Missouri battalions and Bledsoe's battery. Bledsoe placed his battery so as to command the enemy's position. Reid's battery was somewhat east of Bledsoe's. The infantry advanced to the attack and Bledsoe and Reid opened at point-blank range. Sigel was taken by surprise and his men thrown into confusion, and when McCulloch and McIntosh, with 400 of the Third Louisiana and Rosser's and O'Kane's battalions, broke through the brush and charged his battery his whole force fled, abandoning the guns, some going one way and some another. Sigel and Salomon, with about 200 of the German Home Guards and Carr's company of regular cavalry, tried to get back to Springfield by the route they came, but were attacked by Lieutenant-Col
Churchill (search for this): chapter 6
e. The next day, the 4th of July, McCulloch and Pearce entered Missouri with Churchill's mounted Confederate regiment, Gratiot's Arkansas infantry, Carroll's mounted Price pressed forward to his relief. On approaching Neosho, McCulloch sent Churchill with two companies to capture a company Sigel had left there. This ChurchillChurchill did without firing a gun. He not only took 137 prisoners, but what was of more importance, captured 510 stand of arms and seven wagons loaded with army supplies. Af the Confederates. He planted a battery on a small hill within 500 yards of Churchill's camp, disposed his men so as to capture every one coming or going, and waity, which was followed in a moment by the guns of Sigel, who hadopened fire on Churchill and Greer and Brown, and was driving them in confusion out of the little vallaged fiercely. Though hard pressed, Price had not yielded a foot of ground. Churchill, who held a position on the left of the line, dismounted his men and moved th
mile or more away, came up at a double-quick and formed between Slack and Cawthorn. In the meantime Woodruff had taken position with his Arkansas battery on an elevated point of land overlooking the field from the east, and at the first sound of Totten's guns had opened a fire on Lyon which retarded his advance and greatly aided the Missourians in getting into position. The battle was now fairly set. The opposing forces were nearly equal. Price had about 3,500 men, and Lyon, deducting the 1d become inconceivably fierce all along the entire line, the enemy appearing in front, often in three or four ranks, lying down, kneeling and standing, and the line often approaching to within thirty or forty yards, as the enemy would charge upon Totten's battery and would be driven back. General Price was painfully wounded in the side, but did not leave the field. He only said to those who were near him that if he were as slim as Lyon the bullet would not have hit him. Weightman was borne to
James Harding (search for this): chapter 6
arms, no military supplies, and no money to buy any. The men never expected to be and never were paid. But men and horses had to be fed, and on Cowskin prairie there was little but green corn and poor beef upon which to feed them. Quartermaster-Gen. James Harding and Chief Commissary John Reid went to Fort Smith, and then to Little Rock and Memphis, in search of supplies, but that was a slow process. The men and horses managed to live on what the country afforded, and while General Harding wGeneral Harding was absent, Col. Edward Haren acted as quartermaster-general, and by his activity, industry and unfailing courtesy did wonders in providing the absolutely necessary supplies, and making the men contented. All of General Price's staff, except his adjutant-general, Colonel Henry Little, were civilians, and knew nothing of the military duties their position imposed upon them. But they were willing and learned rapidly. The Granby mines furnished lead, and Governor Jackson's forethought had provi
J. C. Thornton (search for this): chapter 6
the creek, and Price, ordering his infantry and artillery to follow, rushed up Bloody Hill—a considerable eminence in the midst of the field and so named because the battle that ensued roared and broke in bloody waves around it—and took command of Cawthorn's brigade, which was falling back fighting, in the hope of holding the enemy in check until his infantry and artillery could come up. These were forming, and they came up the hill with a rush. First came Slack, with Hughes' regiment and Thornton's battalion, and formed on the left of Cawthorn; then Clark, with Burbridge's regiment, and formed on the left of Slack; then Parsons, with Kelly's regiment and Guibor's battery, and formed on the left of Clark, and on the extreme left of the line McBride took position with his two regiments. Shortly after Rives, with some dismounted men, reinforced Slack; and Weightman, with Clarkson's and Hurst's regiments which had been encamped a mile or more away, came up at a double-quick and formed
Springfield he began writing and sending representatives to St. Louis and Washington demanding reinforcements. But his demands received little if any attention. General Fremont was in command of the Western department, and did not seem disposed to help him. When assured that Lyon must and would fight at Springfield, he simply replied: If he does he will do it on his own responsibility. Lyon chafed, and abused everybody. If it is the intention, he said, to give up the West, let it be so; Scott will cripple us if he can. At last two regiments—Stevenson's at Booneville, and Montgomery's at Leavenworth—were ordered to report to him at Springfield. But they never reached there. It was a question with Lyon whether to fight or retreat, and the first alternative seemed to be safer than the last. His only line of retreat was to Rolla, 125 miles distant, through a broken, rugged country, with the probability that Price's and McCulloch's mounted men would be thrown in his front, while t
Sterling Price (search for this): chapter 6
Lyon Leaves Booneville for the southwest Price reinforced by McCulloch and Pearce they star the principal towns and prevent recruits from Price's army crossing, and began his march to the sosville the next day. General Pearce loaned General Price 605 muskets with which to help arm his men. General Price returned to Cowskin prairie, organized his men as well as he could, and placed tken, rugged country, with the probability that Price's and McCulloch's mounted men would be thrown m the southwest. Rains instantly informed General Price, and formed his own command. McCulloch was at Price's quarters, and this was the first intimation either of them had that Lyon and his army en so as to meet Sigel's attack and to protect Price's rear, posting the Third Louisiana, McIntosh'm to the center, where the need was greatest. Price then advanced Guibor's battery in line with thmoment he was dead. Of him in his report, General Price said: Among those who fell mortally wounde[29 more...]
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