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Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
, to serve in almost every State in the Confederacy. It belonged to what might be called, not disrespectfully, the tramp brigade. It saw service in South Carolina. It fought in Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina and Mississippi. It traversed Alabama and Georgia, and served for some time on the Island of Hope, in the latter State, including in its service a term of bombardment in Fort Sumter. It might be said to have been ubiquitous. Its first battle was the Second Manassas, and in this hilated. This table is of great interest to us of this State, for it shows that of the twenty-six regiments that sustained the heaviest losses on our side, six were South Carolina regiments, four were Georgia, four Tennessee, three Texas, three Alabama, three North Carolina, two Virginia and one Mississippi regiment. And it is of still greater interest to us here to-day, for, of these six South Carolina regiments, two of them are represented by the survivors of Fairfield district. The list
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
n; who had slaughtered Burnside at Fredericksburg and routed Hooker at Chancellorsville; who had held Fort Sumter against all comers; who had left their dead from Charleston to Gettysburg, from Gettysburg to Chickamauga, and from Chickamauga to Knoxville, and from Knoxville to the Wilderness; who had defeated a much greater man than Sherman—Grant himself—in every engagement from the Wilderness to Petersburg; had killed and wounded in a month more men in Grant's army than they had in their own; Knoxville to the Wilderness; who had defeated a much greater man than Sherman—Grant himself—in every engagement from the Wilderness to Petersburg; had killed and wounded in a month more men in Grant's army than they had in their own; who had yielded at last, not to Grant, nor to Sherman—not to arms, but to starvation? As General Preston has so well expressed it: Address before Survivors' Association, Columbia, 1870. We surrendered no army of 200,000 equipped soldiers as at Sedan, but, at Appomattox, a starving skeleton, with scarce blood enough left to stain the swords of our conquerors; our surrender was not to New England, but to death! It was on the wives and children of these men that Sherman warred.
Mecklenburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
every American, and giving an account of the declaration for independence by the people of Mecklenburg county, the first public declaration, it is claimed, by the constituted authorities of a State, May 27th, 1776—asks who were the people of Mecklenburg, and whence did they come? What were their habits and the manners by which they were characterized? What were their religious principles? The to take the part they did in the Revolution. It is true that some of them, notably those in Mecklenburg led by the Alexanders, Brevards, McKnitts and others, who joined in the famous declaration ofin their tents and the officers in the house. Colonel Bratton, who was then with Sumter at Mecklenburg, having heard of this movement, concluded that it was aimed at him and his associates in the attack at Mobley's. He gathered his neighbors, who were with him at Mecklenburg, and they hastened with all dispatch to prevent the impending mischief. He arrived in the neighborhood after dark with
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
an fifty per cent in a single battle. The author says that these are instances of excessive loss, and that these lists represent the maximum loss and may be of interest to such historians as persist in telling of regiments that were all cut to pieces or commands which were annihilated. This table is of great interest to us of this State, for it shows that of the twenty-six regiments that sustained the heaviest losses on our side, six were South Carolina regiments, four were Georgia, four Tennessee, three Texas, three Alabama, three North Carolina, two Virginia and one Mississippi regiment. And it is of still greater interest to us here to-day, for, of these six South Carolina regiments, two of them are represented by the survivors of Fairfield district. The list is as follows: regiment.battle.Present in action.Killed and Wounded.Per Cent. First TexasAntietam22618682 Twenty-first GeorgiaManassas24218476 Eighth TennesseeStone River44430669 Seventeenth South CarolinaManassas2
Bullock Creek (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
nel Richard Winn. Lands were given by Colonel Winn and Colonel John Vanderhorst in the year 1784, and the school placed under the charge of the Rev. Thomas Harris McCaule, and enlarged into a college. The Mount Zion College, the Charleston College, and the College at Cambridge, Ninety-Six, were incorporated by the same act in 1785. Jackson went to school to Dr. Humphreys in the Waxhaws during the Revolution, and Dr. Joseph Alexander kept one open there, and there was another at Bullock's Creek, York county, during this period; and there was also a school at Fishing Creek, kept open by Mrs. Gaston, the wife of Justice John Gaston. Inter arma leges silent, but letters were not allowed to sleep even though war was waging around the school-houses. Is it any wonder that the old Waxhaws have produced Andrew Jackson; Stephen D. Miller, the great jurist and statesman; James H. Thornwell, the great theologian; and J. Marion Sims, the greatest surgeon of this country? Judge William Smith, w
Winnsboro (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
, 1776-1861. an Address to the Survivors of Fairfield county, delivered at Winnsboro, S. C., September 1,1888. by Col. Edward McCrady, Jr. It is no disparagement oe qualities which go to make brave men and good soldiers. This old town of Winnsboro has been twice the headquarters of an invading army, once burned, and twice rd Pickens, Cornwallis was compelled to fall back and retreated to this place, Winnsboro, from which he might watch the threatened points of Camden, Granby and Ninetyit was probably about the time when Lord Cornwallis moved his headquarters to Winnsboro, in 1780. Two years after the end of the war, i. e., in 1783, a committee ofy of the Rebellion, and see there the pictures of the burning of Columbia and Winnsboro, and read the unpitying and exultant comments upon the misery they depict, I ors and boastful recorders of such inhumanity. There is there a picture of Winnsboro in flames, and on the next page there is one of Hanging Rock, Sumter's battle
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
men that the South had controlled the government for nearly eighty years from its commencement, and attributed its loss of control to the neglect of this means by which she had gained it, and warned the young men of the North that the renewed devotion of the South to education might again give to the South the government if the youths of the North should yield to the inertia of luxury. Since that article has appeared, South Carolina has had in the great national educational institution at West Point a contestant for the first place in three out of four graduating classes. In one of them the youthful representative of this State outstripped all his competitors, graduating with next to the highest record ever reached in that institution. Henry Jervey, of Charleston. Fairfield furnished the two others of the young men who have already done honor to the State. Henry C. Davis and David St. P. Gaillard. As Dr. Foote has written of the women of this section in earlier days: an ed
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
had put an end to the cause of liberty in South Carolina—to the same people, who at Hanging Rock, Cn department. The advance of Gates into South Carolina roused into action all the latent energiesates, with the army sent for the relief of South Carolina, was defeated. Flushed with victory, buDaniel. The security of his conquest in South Carolina thus threatened by the sudden incursions oith Gates' army reorganized, advanced into South Carolina for its recovery. But while Cornwallis lly, the tramp brigade. It saw service in South Carolina. It fought in Virginia, Maryland, North C At the head of this regiment fell one of South Carolina's noblest citizens. I have spoken of Ca that battle; but it shows, also, that for South Carolina troops the Second Manassas was the severes occasion I have shown that in this battle South Carolina lost more than 25 per cent. of all her tr luxury. Since that article has appeared, South Carolina has had in the great national educational [6 more...]
Chester, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
es from Fairfield were: Fairfield Fencibles, Captain John Bratton; Boyd Guards, Captain J. N. Shedd; Little Run Guards, Captain J. M. Brice; Buck Head Guards, Captain E. J. Means; Cedar Creek Rifles, Captain J. R. Harrison. The companies from Chester were: Chester Blues, Captain E. C. McLure; Captain G. L. Strait's company, Captain J. A. Walker's company, Captain O. Harden's company, and Captain J. Mike Brown's company. Colonel Rion resigned in June, 1861, and the regiment went to Virgini was appointed brigadier-general, and assigned to the command of this brigade. It was while under his command that the fearful battle of the Crater took place on the 3d July, 1864, in which, as Colonel McMaster justly observed in his address at Chester on the 13th August, 1879, it seldom falls to the lot of a regiment to act such a conspicuous part in saving an army as did the Seventeenth on that occasion. Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. X, p. 119. Colonel McMaster is fully just
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): chapter 1.1
ust, 1862, while commanding the Stonewall Brigade under Jackson,) was assigned to the command and did much to perfect its organization. But it was under Lieutenant-Colonel Secrest, who had been a distinguished officer of the Palmetto regiment in Mexico, that the regiment was to make its first fight and win its first laurels. Though the Sixth was not in time to take part in the First Manassas, it was to be the next regiment from this State to be able to style itself veteran. It was engaged inganized by the election of Colonel R. G. M. Dunnovant, of Chester, as Colonel; Dixon Barnes, of Lancaster, as Lieutenant-Colonel; and Cadwalader Jones, of York, as Major. Colonel Dunnovant had been Lieutenant-Colonel of the Palmetto regiment in Mexico. The Twelfth, with the Thirteenth and Fourteenth, commenced its service on the coast, and was present at the bombardment of Hilton Head, but was not actively engaged. In April, 1862, it was ordered to Virginia with the Thirteenth and Fourteen
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