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Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
ed by me before the survivors of the Twelfth regiment at Walhalla, S. C., on Gregg's brigade at Manassas (see Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XIII, p. 1), it is stated that the First South Carolina volunteers was guided into the action by Lieutenant Fellows, of the Thirteenth. I am assured by Captain J. A. Hinnant, of the Twelfth, that the statement is a mistake, that it was he who did so, and I make this correction at his request.—E. McC., Jr. Then followed the capture of Harper's Ferry and the battle of Sharpsburg, in which the Twelfth sustained the irreparable loss of Colonel Barnes, and in which Captains J. L. Miller and H. C. Davis and Lieutenant R. M. Kerr were wounded. The Twelfth lost 102 of the 163 killed and wounded in the whole brigade. It was more fortunate at Shepherdstown, in which it had but one wounded, and scarcely less so at Fredericksburg, where it lost but eight out of the 336 killed and wounded in the brigade. A most gallant young officer from Fai
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
nst the perpetrators and boastful recorders of such inhumanity. There is there a picture of Winnsboro in flames, and on the next page there is one of Hanging Rock, Sumter's battle ground, and between them are pictures of Sherman's foragers and bummers coming in with their spoils and dividing their booty. With these pictures is the story that when Kilpatrick reached Hanging Rock he reported to Sherman that several dead bodies of Federal soldiers had been found in the road with a label by Hampton's cavalry, that such would be the fate of all Foragers. Whereupon Sherman, it is said, directed immediate retaliation, and is reported as having delivered himself of these heroic sentiments: Harper's Pictorial History of the Rebellion, Vol. II, p. 119. We have a perfect right to the products of the country we overrun, and may collect them by forage or otherwise. Let the people know that the war is now against them, because their army flees before us and do not defend the country as
Cornwallis (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
by his victory at Camden he had put an end to the cause of liberty in South Carolina—to the same people, who at Hanging Rock, Cowpens and King's Mountain, avenged Tarleton's slaughter of Bufort's men at the Waxhaws and the destruction of Sumter's force at Fishing Creek—to the same people who lit again the lamp of liberty, the light of which had been put out at Charleston, and kept its feeble rays alive during the disastrous time from Gates' defeat at Camden to the surrender at Yorktown of Cornwallis. You belong to the same people, and the names which your forefathers had made honorable in the successful war of the Revolution you have rendered still more honorable in the unsuccessful war of Secession. The State of South Carolina was peopled by two distinct tides of immigration. The Englishmen and the Huguenots had come into the province by the sea, and had pushed their way into the interior, following the courses of the rivers, but their settlements did not extend beyond the point
Boonsboro (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
marched forward in line of battle up a hill in the direction of the Chinn House in face of a terrific fire of the enemy, which was concentrated from two batteries, one on each side, and a regiment of infantry a short distance in front. Near this place our noble chief, Colonel Means, was mortally wounded and died two days after, lamented not only by every man in his command but by every good citizen of South Carolina. The next engagement of the Seventeenth regiment was in Maryland, at Boonesboro, on the 14th September, in which out of 141 present the regiment lost sixty-one killed, wounded and missing. In this battle Lieutenant-Colonel R. Stark Means was shot through the thigh, and Colonel McMaster reports that he had detailed four men to bear him off, but that Colonel Means refused to allow them to make the effort as the enemy was in a short distance of him and still advancing. Colonel Means died from the effects of the wound. Thus the son soon followed his father. At Sharpsbu
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
left standing alone amidst the ruins around them. In both instances these invasions followed the fall of Charleston and disaster to our arms elsewhere. The first, however, ultimately ended with the surrender of the British under Cornwallis at Yorktown and the independence of the United States. The latter culminated at Appomattox and ended in the loss of our cause and the failure of the Confederate States. In the first, the invaders found the men of the country present to resist if not repelf Sumter's force at Fishing Creek—to the same people who lit again the lamp of liberty, the light of which had been put out at Charleston, and kept its feeble rays alive during the disastrous time from Gates' defeat at Camden to the surrender at Yorktown of Cornwallis. You belong to the same people, and the names which your forefathers had made honorable in the successful war of the Revolution you have rendered still more honorable in the unsuccessful war of Secession. The State of South Car
Fairfield, Conn. (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
m the districts of York, Chester, Lancaster, Fairfield and Kershaw, that constituted the old Camdenthe records of the Confederate soldiers from Fairfield, and Kershaw, and York, and Chester, and Lanmarched under the leaves of the Palmetto. Fairfield volunteers—Gregg's First regiment. In res brigade. A most gallant young officer from Fairfield was, however, killed in the First, Captain Tely of men from York, Chester, Lancaster and Fairfield. These were: Three companies from York, Cap service, and in 1862 he raised a company in Fairfield, and with Colonel P. H. Nelson, of Kershaw, e, besides these, two troops of cavalry from Fairfield. One troop in the First cavalry under Colonr, Woodward and Black were heroes enough for Fairfield. But the heroism of our troops was not conf war. This would make 1,750 men furnished by Fairfield to the line, add to these the quota of staffinstitution. Henry Jervey, of Charleston. Fairfield furnished the two others of the young men wh[12 more...]
Hamburg, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
the names which your forefathers had made honorable in the successful war of the Revolution you have rendered still more honorable in the unsuccessful war of Secession. The State of South Carolina was peopled by two distinct tides of immigration. The Englishmen and the Huguenots had come into the province by the sea, and had pushed their way into the interior, following the courses of the rivers, but their settlements did not extend beyond the points we now know as Camden, Columbia and Hamburg. The upper country, which lay beyond the Sandy Ridge, once described as the desert and which we now call the Piedmont section, was settled later by a different class of people. It was eighty years after the first settlement on the coast that parties of Scotch-Irish from Pennsylvania and Virginia began to come down to this province—a movement which was greatly accelerated by the defeat of Braddock in 1755, which left the frontiers of those States exposed to the incursions of the Indians.
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
III, p. 112. I can find no report of its losses. From North Carolina the brigade was sent to reinforce Vicksburg, and reported to General Joseph E. Johnston at Jackson on the 3d June, Johnston's Narrative, p. 190. but did not reach Vicksburg. It was engaged in some skirmishing at Jackson, but nothing more. From Mississippi thJackson, but nothing more. From Mississippi the brigade was ordered to the Isle of Hope, near Savannah, where it was encamped during the winter of 1863-‘64. From Savannah this regiment was sent to Charleston, where it furnished its details for the garrison at Fort Sumter, and thence it rejoined the Army of Northern Virginia in the spring of 1864 under the command of General Wthe page of history. Justice has never been done him. But he has not wanted those who appreciated him. He was thus eulogized in a paper during the war: Jackson, Mississippi, Crisis, Marginalia, p. 174. Among these private soldiers are to be found men of culture, men of gentle training, men of intellect, men of social posit
Waxhaw (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
e Seventh regiment, also was a native of this country and should be counted among her sons who served the State so well. Bratton, the Meanses, the Aikens, the Davises, Rion, McMaster, Woodward and Black were heroes enough for Fairfield. But the heroism of our troops was not confined to their leaders. The descendants of those, who had fought under the Brattons and McLures in the Revolution, were as brave as their leaders and as conscientious in the discharge of their duty. In that old Waxhaw churchyard I have seen this quaint inscription upon a stone: Here lies the body of William Blair, who departed this life in the sixty-fourth year of his age on the 2d July, A. D, 1821, at 9 P. M. He was born in the county of Antrim, Ireland, on the 24th March, 1759. When about thirteen years old he came with his father to this country, where he resided till his death. He was a Revolutionary patriot, and in the humble station of private soldier and wagon master, he contributed more
Fishing Creek (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.1
ter of Bufort's men at the Waxhaws and the destruction of Sumter's force at Fishing Creek—to the same people who lit again the lamp of liberty, the light of which haSumter seemed to have indulged a belief that he was safe, and having passed Fishing Creek, in Chester, some eight miles, he halted for rest. His arms were stacked; ity was allowed Sumter to repay Tarleton at Blackstocks for his surprise at Fishing Creek, and to avenge the slaughter there. Then followed our great victory at Cck's Creek, York county, during this period; and there was also a school at Fishing Creek, kept open by Mrs. Gaston, the wife of Justice John Gaston. Inter arma legerossed at Rocky Mount in pursuit of Sumter, and mercilessly slew his men at Fishing Creek, he did so when battling against men whom the rules of war justified his slassacre of Bufort's men at the Waxhaw and of the destruction of Sumter's at Fishing Creek; for however dreadful those deeds, and distressing to the recollection, the
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