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Montgomery County (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
Edwin J. Christian, elected at the reorganization about two weeks before; Captain C. C. Blacknall, of of Company G, then became Major of the regiment, Isaac J. Young, succeeding to the Captaincy of Company G. Major Christian was a native of Montgomery county—a gallant soldier, while in all relations of his life he had borne a high and honorable name. Captain Ambrose Scarborough, of Company C, though written as among the killed in the battle, fell on the afternoon preceding while leading a reconnoitering party. A native also of Montgomery county, his career had been alike honorable in peace and war. The officers wounded in the battle were, Lieutenant-Colonel R. D. Johnston, Captain William Johnston, Captain I. J. Young, Lieutenant McDonald. Lieutenants Luria and Knott, both of Granville, were killed. The killed of privates and non-commissioned officers numbered thirty-five, while seventy-eight was the number of the same ranks wounded. These figures are taken from Moore's Roster, a
Bell's Landing (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
ing before our command. The career of General Robert D. Johnston's Brigade, in the brilliant campaign with Early, is but a history of the 23d Regiment, which constantly shared its fortunes through it all—thence again to the lines at Petersburg, and down to the end. The next fighting done by the brigade was as a part of Early's command in that truly great march on Washington city. The brigade was in all the battles of that command, and made the flank movement with Gordon's Division at Bell Grove and Cedar Creek. In this battle it had a hand-to-hand conflict with the 6th Army Corps. It captured, with the aid of Battle's Brigade, of Alabama, six pieces of artillery, which were gallantly defended by the artillerymen, who died at their posts rather than surrender. The brigade was ordered to take position in front of Middleburg, where it remained during the day, having skirmished with cavalry in front. That evening General Sheridan, having taken command of the Federal troops, made
Gaines Mill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
all had got in their rear, abandoned their position, destroying ammunition, &c., and fell back to a yet stronger line of works. In fact they had three lines of battle here, each protected by breastworks extending from a point on the left near Gaines' Mill, to a point on the right beyond Cold Harbor. In the attack on this position, the division of D. H. Hill—to which the 23d belonged—was the first to become engaged. When the battle became general, and the whole of Jackson's and Longstreet's coas between 150 and 175, officers and privates. Sergeant-Major W. F. Gill, of Granville, was killed at Malvern Hill; Captain Cole, of Co. D, and Lieutenant Munday, of K, were wounded. Adjutant Turner, of Granville, was wounded in the fight at Gaines' Mill, and Captain Young of the same county wounded at Malvern Hill. After Malvern Hill several weeks of quiet were passed near Richmond. No further movement was attempted by McClellan on the Peninsula. The next movement of the Washington gover
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
ransportation facilities, the three companies were enabled to reach their destination and join the regiment which was then in quarters at Camp Wigfall, near the late battle-field. For several weeks encamped at this place, the regiment suffered exceedingly from sickness. By the surgeon's statement the sick-call at one time numbered 240, while fifty-seven of the cases were typhoid fever. The mortality was large. From camp to camp the command was moved until it went into winter-quarters on Bull Run in December, where it remained, with only such changes in position as the exigencies of the situation in outpost and picket duty required, until the 8th day of March, 1862. Meantime the regiment had been incorporated into a brigade with the 5th N. C. State Troops, Colonel Duncan K. McRae; the 20th Georgia, Colonel Smith; the 24th Virginia, Colonel Jubal A. Early, and the 38th Virginia, of which brigade Colonel Early being the ranking officer, he was placed in command, subsequently being co
McAllister (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
fell back into Virginia. In operations at Vidiersville, and near Brandy Station in the fall of 1863, the regiment sustained loss, but not heavy. In barracks, at Hanover, during the winter of 1863 and 1864, the regiment may be said to have had a really good time, as did the entire brigade. So at the opening of the campaign in 186ty men of the regiment escaped death, wounding or capture. It was about the 7th of May, 1864, that the brigade, after a season of recreation in the vicinity of Hanover and Taylorsville, received orders to rejoin the army at the Wilderness, near Spotsylvania Court House. General Grant was now in command on the other side. The battle of Mine Run, and participated in that fight, although the brigade was not actively engaged, as it was a mere skirmish. The brigade reached the army, from Hanover, just before the battle of the Wilderness. It participated in the engagement with Gordon's Brigade, turning the right flank of the Federal line. The brigade, in
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
t this point that D. H. Hill's charge was directed. McClellan's defeated army fell back upon Malvern Hill, a strongly entrenched position, where he managed to concentrate his forces and park his threund Richmond. The greatest loss sustained by the 23rd in the seven days of fighting was at Malvern Hill. According to Captain Cole, of Co. D, the number of killed in this battle was about thirty; n 150 and 175, officers and privates. Sergeant-Major W. F. Gill, of Granville, was killed at Malvern Hill; Captain Cole, of Co. D, and Lieutenant Munday, of K, were wounded. Adjutant Turner, of Granle, was wounded in the fight at Gaines' Mill, and Captain Young of the same county wounded at Malvern Hill. After Malvern Hill several weeks of quiet were passed near Richmond. No further movementMalvern Hill several weeks of quiet were passed near Richmond. No further movement was attempted by McClellan on the Peninsula. The next movement of the Washington government was to appoint John Pope, the man who had always seen only the backs of his enemies, to take command of th
Catawba River (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
hose they first bore. The re-arrangement, therefore, changed the old 13th into the 23rd. Under the ordinance referred to, ten companies from the following counties, viz: one from each, Richmond, Anson, Montgomery, Mecklenburg, Lincoln, Gaston, Catawba and three from Granville, were entered in the official records of the adjutant-general at Raleigh, as the 13th Regiment Volunteers. The several companies were ordered to rendezvous at Garysburg, Northampton county, and the line officers thereof. Marllee, Anson. Company B—Captain George W. Seagle, Lincoln. Company C—Captain C. J. Cochran, Montgomery. Company D—Captain Louis H. Webb, Richmond. Company E—Captain James H. Horner, Granville. Company F—Captain M. F. McCorkle, Catawba. Company G—Captain Charles C. Blacknall, Granville. Company H—Captain E. M. Fairis, Gaston. Company I—Captain Rufus Amis, Granville. Company K—Captain Robert D. Johnston, Lincoln. On Wednesday, July 17, 1861, Colonel Ho
Rebellion Records (search for this): chapter 1.16
iers, proclaim the surrender of Lee's proud army. Dr. R. J. Hicks, now of Warrenton, Virginia, who was a faithful surgeon to the 23rd, all through the war, says of the regiment: It did as much hard service, fought in as many battles, was as constant in the performance of duty as any other regiment in the army. And at Appomattox, says Dr. Hicks, it surrendered about as many men as any other regiment in the army. By the Appomattox parole lists, taken from the last volume of the Rebellion Records, it is shown that Johnston's brigade, at the surrender, numbered 463 men, rank and file. At that time, the brigade was commanded by Colonel J. W. Lea. We close this paper with the addition of the following statistics, taken from the source above indicated, with reference to North Carolina soldiers surrendered at Appomattox: Total, forty-two regiments and one battalion infantry; five regiments and one battalion cavalry, and five battalions artillery. That all these should have numb
John Pegram (search for this): chapter 1.16
re pressed upon, being the only organized force then of the Confederate army. After falling back near Cedar Creek, General Pegram sent an order to Johnston to cross the bridge and follow the road towards Strasburg. General Johnston sent a message (Johnston) could cross; but that he could cross below, and preserve his brigade intact. A second staff officer from General Pegram commanded Johnston to bring his brigade across the bridge just under the command of those breastworks, which, in the rded immediately above. In the valley campaign, the brigade was transferred to Ramseur's division. At his death, General John Pegram succeeded to the command of the division. Almost simultaneous with the transfer of Sheridan from the valley to Gr part in the fight at Hatcher's Run, Captain Peace, of Granville, being its commander. It was in this action that General John Pegram was killed, and Captain Frank Bennett, of Anson, formerly commander of the 23rd, lost an arm, at the time being in
sed privilege of spreading ever living flowers upon his grave. Charles Christopher Blacknall was born in Granville county, North Carolina, December 4th, 1831. He was a brother of Dr. George W. Blacknall and Major T. H., and father of Mr. Oscar Blacknall—a man of letters and well known from his productions in the Atlantic Monthly and the newspapers. He married Miss Virginia Spencer, of Oxford, who still lives to mourn the death of her true and manly husband. These facts we get from Captain Capehart's recently delivered memorial on Colonel Blacknall, and from the Henderson Gold Leaf, whose editor, commenting on the truth and beauty of that address, adds his own eulogy of the dead: Colonel Blacknall had ardent patriotism, high conviction of right and principle, and an engaging manhood. His presence was attractive, his gifts were many, his heroism of a lofty type. Such a man must needs have made an ideal Southern soldier. He received his death wound at the battle of Winch
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