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ce Course to the salient on the lines held by Colquitt's brigade. Hagood's, Colquitt's and ClingmanColquitt's and Clingman's brigades comprised Hoke's division. Clingman's brigade did not come up until the 19th. The extr nearly the same field. From Rion's forts to Colquitt's salient there was a short gap. The forts wein the old canal, then the gap was closed and Colquitt's salient became nearer the Federal lines. Beyond Colquitt's salient to the east the lines ran to the salient, variously called Pegram's (who ocattery at the Appomattox. From that point to Colquitt's salient, the Confederate lines remained undrse, and into an open field nearly aligned on Colquitt's salient, and we commenced immediately to th line of battle ready, and we moved away from Colquitt's left, across the gap to the forts. The Fedwas the old Colonial Canal, leading from near Colquitt's salient down to the Appomattox, and it madestwardly, and the other regiments extended to Colquitt's salient in the same direction; to the west
James H. Rion (search for this): chapter 1.23
rt of the same had ever before reached him. Colonel Rion, who usually made these reports, was woundeays afterwards, on nearly the same field. From Rion's forts to Colquitt's salient there was a shortly-Sergeant Malone, of D, the front company, Major Rion has opened his brandy flask. Rion always caand halted along the track. The 7th, under Colonel Rion, was in front and nearest to Petersburg. Teers from the brigade to go to Petersburg. Colonel Rion stepped out and said: The whole battalion wveral men. The Federals fled. I reported to Major Rion, who sent me to General Hoke. He ordered Maould. By the time I rejoined the regiment Major Rion had his line of battle ready, and we moved ao artillerists to manage it. I told him some of Rion's old company B, were among the pioneers and we did not report myself. How is this? asked Major Rion. I told it was slight, and I did not want ming officer for them, and I carried then out to Rion. He had been wounded in the right forearm at D[9 more...]
William J. Hoke (search for this): chapter 1.23
ace Course to the salient on the lines held by Colquitt's brigade. Hagood's, Colquitt's and Clingman's brigades comprised Hoke's division. Clingman's brigade did not come up until the 19th. The extreme west of the line was held by a Virginia batte road, until we came just south of Hare's Race Course. There we were marched into a depression among the hills, where General Hoke had his headquarters, and were rationed. About dusk we were marched to the north of the race course, and into an opene before the Federals, and the Federals lost several men. The Federals fled. I reported to Major Rion, who sent me to General Hoke. He ordered Major Rion to advance his whole battalion into the forts, and to hold them if he could. By the time I y blood letting. Don't let this occur again. I told him I hoped it would not. But all things must come to an end. General Hoke had been preparing an interior line for us, while we were fighting the forts. South of Hare's Race Course was the old
he front and towards the river, across the open field. I was standing on the parapet of the fort watching them. The Federals trained their guns upon them, and I saw these brave soldiers killed. Along with them were Lieutenant Allemong and Sergeant Beckman. I knew them all well. Ward Hopkins was a classmate with me in the South Carolina College, and no more knightly spirit ever served the Confederacy. Beckman and I had gone to the same Sunday-school and church in our boyhood. A Tadpole. Beckman and I had gone to the same Sunday-school and church in our boyhood. A Tadpole. During the night of the 17th the ammunition gave out, and it was brought up in an army wagon. I had to distribute it to the regiments on our left. I started with a detail, carried out my orders, and was returning to headquarters, when I missed my bridge and brought up in the swamp. As bad luck would have it, the Federals made an attack at that time. Then I was in the swamp and water, with the Federals in front of me, and the 25th regiment in rear of me. There was no alternative except t
W. C. Clyburn (search for this): chapter 1.23
derate pickets; and all the Confederates had to do was to draw a bead on them and make them stand and deliver. Captain W. C. Clyburn, of Co. G, was at that time acting as major, and inasmuch as we had recovered the cannon on the 17th he was put ht back to the canal. It was right in the road, and the Federal prisoners, when brought in, would be brought before Captain Clyburn. He is now, and was then, one of the politest men in the world. He would receive these Federal officers with the utmost courtesy, but he would always insist on the spoils of war. Captain Clyburn had plenty of greenbacks and good clothing so long as this trap lasted. He lived well, too. He once asked me to dinner with him. Take this seat, up against this tree; n this mark, said he, showing me a spot on the tree about three inches above my head. About a day or two afterwards Captain Clyburn showed me where a Federal ball had struck the tree fully six inches below, just where my head had been. Four year
miny, Malvern Hill, and Haws's Shop; and on the morning of the 16th were on the north bank of the James river, near the pontoon bridge at Drewry's Bluff. We were hurriedly marched across the bridge to the south side of the James, and on to the Petersburg and Richmond railroad, near Chester Courthouse. It was a cool morning, and as I was marching near Major Rion, there came to my nose the most fragrant scent a weary soldier ever inhaled. What is that? I asked. Hush, said Orderly-Sergeant Malone, of D, the front company, Major Rion has opened his brandy flask. Rion always carried a flask filled with French brandy for an emergency, and, wearied with the fatiguing campaign and march, he had taken a morning dram. I believe the smell did me as much good as the dram did for him. We came to the railroad, about sixteen miles or so from Petersburg, and halted along the track. The 7th, under Colonel Rion, was in front and nearest to Petersburg. Towards evening, Major Ed. Willis,
Percy Elliott (search for this): chapter 1.23
s, on nearly the same field. From Rion's forts to Colquitt's salient there was a short gap. The forts were somewhat nearer to the Federal lines than the salient, but when on the 19th the forts were abandoned and new lines established south of Hare's Race Course, in the old canal, then the gap was closed and Colquitt's salient became nearer the Federal lines. Beyond Colquitt's salient to the east the lines ran to the salient, variously called Pegram's (who occupied it on the 18th of June), Elliott's (who there fought the mine fight in August) and Gracie's (who held it after the mine fight). None of these, however, were engaged on the 18th of June. The attack of the Federals commenced on the 16th. From the Virginia battery, on the banks of the Appomattox, to the Colquitt salient, the Confederate lines were there held by General Wise's Virginia brigade and the Virginia reserves. The Federals came across the James river and advanced on Petersburg by the Charles City roads. They sw
Ward Hopkins (search for this): chapter 1.23
y testifies. About the time General Hagood came to us and was endeavoring to establish the line down to the river, Captain Ward Hopkin's, Captain Walters', and perhaps some other companies, were marched to the front and towards the river, across the open field. I was standing on the parapet of the fort watching them. The Federals trained their guns upon them, and I saw these brave soldiers killed. Along with them were Lieutenant Allemong and Sergeant Beckman. I knew them all well. Ward Hopkins was a classmate with me in the South Carolina College, and no more knightly spirit ever served the Confederacy. Beckman and I had gone to the same Sunday-school and church in our boyhood. A Tadpole. During the night of the 17th the ammunition gave out, and it was brought up in an army wagon. I had to distribute it to the regiments on our left. I started with a detail, carried out my orders, and was returning to headquarters, when I missed my bridge and brought up in the swamp. A
as I know, on our lines, and it did good service, as Mr. Alley testifies. About the time General Hagood came to us and was endeavoring to establish the line down to the river, Captain Ward Hopkin's, Captain Walters', and perhaps some other companies, were marched to the front and towards the river, across the open field. I was standing on the parapet of the fort watching them. The Federals trained their guns upon them, and I saw these brave soldiers killed. Along with them were Lieutenant Allemong and Sergeant Beckman. I knew them all well. Ward Hopkins was a classmate with me in the South Carolina College, and no more knightly spirit ever served the Confederacy. Beckman and I had gone to the same Sunday-school and church in our boyhood. A Tadpole. During the night of the 17th the ammunition gave out, and it was brought up in an army wagon. I had to distribute it to the regiments on our left. I started with a detail, carried out my orders, and was returning to headqu
Edward Willis (search for this): chapter 1.23
ly-Sergeant Malone, of D, the front company, Major Rion has opened his brandy flask. Rion always carried a flask filled with French brandy for an emergency, and, wearied with the fatiguing campaign and march, he had taken a morning dram. I believe the smell did me as much good as the dram did for him. We came to the railroad, about sixteen miles or so from Petersburg, and halted along the track. The 7th, under Colonel Rion, was in front and nearest to Petersburg. Towards evening, Major Ed. Willis, of the Quartermaster's department, came along from Richmond with an engine, tender, and two cars. He called for two companies of volunteers from the brigade to go to Petersburg. Colonel Rion stepped out and said: The whole battalion will go. He directed me to put the eight companies, comprising some 500 men, on the train. It was close packing, standing and sitting, inside and outside, on engine, tender and cars. I was on top taking in the scenery and the pine smoke from the engine
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