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of age, and Mr. Ezekiel says that the time of their immigration was 1815. Mr. Belden says that Judah and his brother Solomon, and his sister Hannah, came to Fayetteville in 1825, lived with their uncle and aunt, and became pupils in the Fayetteville Academy, and that Judah was a classmate of mine during his stay in Fayetteville. Continuing, Mr. Belden says: Mr. Levy (Judah's uncle), desiring to enlarge his business, removed with his sister (Mrs. Wright), and the Benjamins to New Orleans, in 1826. If they prove anything, these statements prove that Judah could not have been in Fayetteville much more than one year; if, indeed, he were ever there at all, except with the Confederate Cabinet on its flight from Richmond at the close of the war in 1865. If he arrived in Fayetteville on January 1, 1825, and departed thence on December 31, 1826, he could not have been in Fayetteville more than two years. It is admitted by Mr. Belden that the Benjamins came to Charleston from the West Indi
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