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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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R. Y. Jones (search for this): chapter 1.5
When the army crossed the Potomac, it was expected of the cavalry to furnish reliable informamation of the movements of the Army of the Potomac. I can find nothing in the records that throws any light upon what it was that detained the two brigades under Robertson in Virginia until July 1st, when they crossed the river at Williamsport. The Army of the Potomac had been withdrawn from Loudoun—the last of the cavalry crossing the river on the 27th, and the positions taken up that night. General Jones, commanding one of the brigades, takes up his report on the 29th, with his command at Snickersville, Loudoun county. There were no reports from the other brigade, and it appears there were no reports from either of them to General Lee at the time of the movements of the enemy. Would not have crossed. What General Lee would have done, had he known the facts fully instead of being compelled to act upon the imperfect information of the scout, is a question open to speculation, for G
James Calhoun (search for this): chapter 1.5
d a definite line of politics and settled for himself the question whether he would assume the role of demagogue or plant himself upon the high plane of statesmanship. He was fortunate too in the place of his birth. Abbeville county, South Carolina, was the home of his nativity and the place of his childhood. It was and is a county prolific of great men. She can rightly claim as her children, either by birth or adoption, John C. Calhoun, George McDuffie, Judge Cheves, Dr. Geddings, Judge James Calhoun, George and Aleck Bowie, Dr. John T. Pressly, the two Wardlaws, and many others whom I might mention. Genius thrives best when it finds kindred spirits around it. If I wanted an illustration of this fact, I would cite Boston with its long list of eminent men. Mr. Petigru received his primary and academic education in his native county, at the school of the celebrated teacher, Rev. Dr. Moses Waddell. He was as fortunate in having such a teacher as Dr. Waddell to start him off as he w
Alexander Stuart (search for this): chapter 1.5
ed that Hill was just where he should have been to observe the movements of Meade's army and to guard the passes through the mountains. Longstreet at Chambersburg, midway between the two wings, was in easy supporting distance of either of them. Stuart, with his three brigades of cavalry, would have rejoined the army on July 1st, for on the morning of that day he reached Dover and in the afternoon Carlisle. It must have been, however, with great reluctance that General Lee would adopt a line of action predicated upon Stuart, for it might be for aught he knew that he had met with a disaster, or been driven back into Virginia. Because General Lee preferred to operate with his army in Pennsylvania until compelled to accept defensive battle with the Army of the Potomac, it by no means follows that an aggressive battle, in which he attacked the enemy as they were assembling, must be unsuccessful, or even that the conditions were necessarily favorable to the enemy. The results of the
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): chapter 1.5
st (page 478): This is a difficult place to defend, as the river is fordable both above and below, and proceeds to comment upon the want of artillery and especially of practiced artillerists, and the deficiency of cavalry, and concludes: The excitement here is not so great as I found it in Philadelphia, and the people begin to understand that the fate of this city depends entirely upon the results of the operations of the Army of the Potomac. Federal apprehension. Simon Cameron to Mr. Lincoln from Harrisburg June 29th (409): Let me impress upon you the absolute necessity of action by Meade to-morrow, even if attended with great risk, because if Lee gets his army across the Susquehannah and puts our army on the defensive on that line, you will readily comprehend the disastrous results that must follow to the country. Secretary E. M. Stanton to General Dana in command at Philadelphia, dated War Department, June 29th (408): It is very important that machinery for manufacturin
Simon Cameron (search for this): chapter 1.5
es: The excitement here is not so great as I found it in Philadelphia, and the people begin to understand that the fate of this city depends entirely upon the results of the operations of the Army of the Potomac. Federal apprehension. Simon Cameron to Mr. Lincoln from Harrisburg June 29th (409): Let me impress upon you the absolute necessity of action by Meade to-morrow, even if attended with great risk, because if Lee gets his army across the Susquehannah and puts our army on the defebut rather pressed him forward to its capture, and after the capture, it may be to turn back to the assistance of Hill, possibly to cross over the river and meet Meade on the line of the Susquehannah, a condition that appeared so alarming to Senator Cameron, or even to hasten to the capture of Philadelphia, trusting to his ability, with the two corps of Longstreet and Hill, to hold Meade's army in check in the mountain passes—an expectation that does not appear so unreasonable, since he, with b
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 1.5
here ahead of him. It had evidently been General Lee's plan to operate west of the South Mountaias Hooker's purpose to have crossed over as General Lee supposed he was doing. Was not informef the 29th. Of this change of arrangement, General Lee had no intimation until the two armies came Thus, it was not what Meade did, but what General Lee thought he was doing that caused him to falere were no reports from either of them to General Lee at the time of the movements of the enemy. w, even if attended with great risk, because if Lee gets his army across the Susquehannah and putsst an attack by Ewell. It is presumed that General Lee knew something of these conditions, for he e been, however, with great reluctance that General Lee would adopt a line of action predicated upo been driven back into Virginia. Because General Lee preferred to operate with his army in Penns artillery), equipped, was only 55,000, and General Lee's numbers could not have been much less. Ro[6 more...]
E. M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 1.5
e of this city depends entirely upon the results of the operations of the Army of the Potomac. Federal apprehension. Simon Cameron to Mr. Lincoln from Harrisburg June 29th (409): Let me impress upon you the absolute necessity of action by Meade to-morrow, even if attended with great risk, because if Lee gets his army across the Susquehannah and puts our army on the defensive on that line, you will readily comprehend the disastrous results that must follow to the country. Secretary E. M. Stanton to General Dana in command at Philadelphia, dated War Department, June 29th (408): It is very important that machinery for manufacturing arms should not fall into the hands of the enemy, and that it should be preserved for the use of the government. In case of imminent danger to the works of Alfred Jenks & Son, of Philadelphia, who is manufacturing arms for the government, you are authorized and directed to impress steam tugs, barges or any description of vessels to remove the gun-
Emmetsburg to Gettysburg, and the other four moving on lines east of that route and kept within easy supporting distance, the 12th and 2d Corps directed upon Gettysburg, the 5th upon Hanover, and the 6th to Manchester, to be a general reserve to the whole, it is almost positively certain that he would not have crossed his army over the mountain. The Union correspondence may throw some light to guide the speculations of those inclined to construct a theory based upon probabilities. General Couch, commanding in that department, with headquarters at Harrisburg, wrote to the Secretary of War June 29th (page 407): I hold from Altoona along the Juniata and Susquehannah to Conowingo bridge above Havre-de-Grace (a distance of more than 200 miles). My whole force organized is, perhaps, 16,000 men. 5000 regulars can whip them all to pieces in an open field. I am afraid they will ford the river in its present state. Again, on the same day, to General Meade: I have only 15,000 men, such
Hugh S. Legare (search for this): chapter 1.5
ne and a burden to carry in after life, Mr. Petigru had no harder fate than many others, among whom I may name Judge David L. Wardlaw, Dr. J. H. Thornwell and Hugh S. Legare, each of whom merits the designation, clarum et venerabile nomen. Mr. Pettigru was well versed in literature. He was familiar with the poets and with all theerature and at the same time excelled in their chosen profession, notably: the silver tongued orator, William C. Preston, and the accomplished man of letters, Hugh S. Legare. The latter was fortunate enough to enjoy almost every advantage afforded by education and travel, and he did not fail to embrace and improve his opportunitias a mooted question in that day, and it has never been settled yet, whether it is best, or even good, for a lawyer to be known as dabbling much in literature. Mr. Legare was afraid that it hurt himself. Judge Story has presented some strong arguments on the other side. He maintains that literature benefits and improves the ver
A. C. Gordon (search for this): chapter 1.5
in regard to the conditions he had to encounter. He must have known something of the quality of the militia, for Early's cavalry had come upon a full regiment of this militia at Gettysburg, which had dispersed so quickly that Jenkins could not get in sight of it. York had been abandoned by the military, and the municipal officers met Early several miles from the city to treat for its surrender. Again, at Wrightsville, 1,200 militia had retreated across the bridge and set fire to it, before Gordon could get his brigade in position to attack. General Early writes (p. 467): I regretted very much the failure to secure the bridge, as, finding the defenseless condition of the country generally, and the little obstacle likely to be afforded by the militia to our progress, I had determined, if I could get possession of the Columbia bridge, to cross my division over the Susquehannah. Ewells possibilities. General Ewell reached Carlisle on the 27th, and writes (p. 443): From Carlisle
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