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John T. Pickett (search for this): chapter 1.28
n whose sides bristled the bayonets of ten thousand foemen, and artillery innumerable. Some one's hands are stained with the blood of these gallant men. As in Pickett's charge, made a few hours later, Steuart's brigade advancing, received, front and flank, a withering fire from infantry and artillery, at enormous odds and entrenched, but the command from brave Steuart was, Fix bayonets; forward, double-quick! And, like Pickett's men, they charged into defeat and death. The analogy is plainer, because the respective charges of Pickett's division and Steuart's brigade, in directions about opposite, moving toward each other, would, if successful, have cuPickett's division and Steuart's brigade, in directions about opposite, moving toward each other, would, if successful, have cut Meade's army in twain. His superior numbers and his earthworks saved him. Were Stonewall Jackson alive, Gettysburg would have been Meade's Waterloo. Colonel Herbert and Major Goldsborough were among five or six hundred Confederate officers, prisoners of war, who were placed within range of the Confederate batteries at Charles
Andrew C. Trippe (search for this): chapter 1.28
ugh was escorted from Philadelphia by Mr. Fred. L. Pitts, an associate with Major Goldsborough on the Philadelphia Record, and a member of Captain William H. Murray's company in the First Maryland regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richard T. Knox and Daniel A. Fenton; Privates N. Lee Goldsborough, Lamar Holliday, J. McKenny White, Sommerville Sollers, D. Ridgely Howard, Thomas D. Harrison, and Daniel L. Thomas. The active pall-bearers were six members of James R. Herbert Camp, in uniform, of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old soldiers were present to testify their love and respect for the beloved old Major. At the grave the s
D. Ridgely Howard (search for this): chapter 1.28
y in the First Maryland regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richard T. Knox and Daniel A. Fenton; Privates N. Lee Goldsborough, Lamar Holliday, J. McKenny White, Sommerville Sollers, D. Ridgely Howard, Thomas D. Harrison, and Daniel L. Thomas. The active pall-bearers were six members of James R. Herbert Camp, in uniform, of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old soldiers were present to testify their love and respect for the beloved old Major. At the grave the service of the Episcopal Church was conducted by Rev. Dr. Dame, a typical soldier; three volleys were fired over the grave; a bugler sounded taps, and all that was mortal of
George W. Booth (search for this): chapter 1.28
fternoon last the startling information was telegraphed to Baltimore of the unexpected death in Philadelphia of Major William Worthington Goldsborough, to Captain George W. Booth, acting President of the Society of the Confederate States Army and Navy in Maryland, to the writer and to Sergeant Richard T. Knox, a famous soldier, whonext, with the active pall-bearers beside the hearse, then followed delegations from the Society of the Confederate States Army and Navy in Maryland under Captain George W. Booth, the James R. Herbert Camp, U. C. V., survivors of the Baltimore City Guard battalion and the Union Veterans' Association, who were proud to honor their wdisabled.) Colonel Johnson put Captain Goldsborough in command of the 48th Virginia Regiment (the ranking officer present for duty being a captain) and made Captain G. W. Booth his brigade-adjutant. Booth was a typical young officer and had been adjutant of the First Maryland. At Second Manassas this brigade, reduced to about 800
Wilson C. Nicholas (search for this): chapter 1.28
nion Veterans' Association, who were proud to honor their war-time valiant antagonist. Mrs. Goldsborough was escorted from Philadelphia by Mr. Fred. L. Pitts, an associate with Major Goldsborough on the Philadelphia Record, and a member of Captain William H. Murray's company in the First Maryland regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richard T. Knox and Daniel A. Fenton; Privates N. Lee Goldsborough, Lamar Holliday, J. McKenny White, Sommerville Sollers, D. Ridgely Howard, Thomas D. Harrison, and Daniel L. Thomas. The active pall-bearers were six members of James R. Herbert Camp, in uniform, of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old
Lamar Holliday (search for this): chapter 1.28
ecord, and a member of Captain William H. Murray's company in the First Maryland regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richard T. Knox and Daniel A. Fenton; Privates N. Lee Goldsborough, Lamar Holliday, J. McKenny White, Sommerville Sollers, D. Ridgely Howard, Thomas D. Harrison, and Daniel L. Thomas. The active pall-bearers were six members of James R. Herbert Camp, in uniform, of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old soldiers were present to testify their love and respect for the beloved old Major. At the grave the service of the Episcopal Church was conducted by Rev. Dr. Dame, a typical soldier; three volleys were fired over the
George H. Steuart (search for this): chapter 1.28
end the funeral. And word failed to reach General George H. Steuart in time, to whom, when Colonel First Marylnd who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnsontle of Gettysburg, the Second Maryland, in General George H. Steuart's brigade, Johnson's division, participated against this charge as being mere murder, but General Steuart replied that he, also, had protested. Goldsborw he watched his gallant men being mowed down. General Steuart, with tears coursing down his cheeks, said: Som for the loss of those brave men. I obeyed orders. Steuart, a typical soldier, a Marylander and a West Pointer As in Pickett's charge, made a few hours later, Steuart's brigade advancing, received, front and flank, a wous odds and entrenched, but the command from brave Steuart was, Fix bayonets; forward, double-quick! And, like the respective charges of Pickett's division and Steuart's brigade, in directions about opposite, moving tow
Albert Davis (search for this): chapter 1.28
hortly afterward elected major, under Lieutenant-Colonel James R. Herbert, who had been Captain of Company D, in the First Maryland. Under these brave veterans as field officers, with much active service, the new Maryland battalion soon became a magnificent fighting phalanx. This regiment was in the flank attack upon the Federal General Milroy's force at Winchester, in June, 1863, which resulted in their total defeat and the capture of about four thousand in all. Milroy, outlawed by President Davis, escaping with a few hundred cavalry. Major Goldsborough, reconnoitering, was one of the first officers with a detachment to enter the town. In the battle of Gettysburg, the Second Maryland, in General George H. Steuart's brigade, Johnson's division, participated with conspicuous valor and suffered dreadfully. They helped carry the enemy's advanced works on Culp's Hill on the evening of the second day—July 2, 1863—the ascent being over huge rocks and other serious obstructions; yet
J. McKenny White (search for this): chapter 1.28
er of Captain William H. Murray's company in the First Maryland regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richard T. Knox and Daniel A. Fenton; Privates N. Lee Goldsborough, Lamar Holliday, J. McKenny White, Sommerville Sollers, D. Ridgely Howard, Thomas D. Harrison, and Daniel L. Thomas. The active pall-bearers were six members of James R. Herbert Camp, in uniform, of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old soldiers were present to testify their love and respect for the beloved old Major. At the grave the service of the Episcopal Church was conducted by Rev. Dr. Dame, a typical soldier; three volleys were fired over the grave; a bugler s
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 1.28
and another of his company were the first militiamen to enter with the marines. In May, 1861, Goldsborough, in his thirtieth year, enlisted as a private in Captain E. R. Dorsey's company in the First Maryland Infantry. In June following he was elected captain of Company A to succeed Captain Bradley T. Johnson, promoted to Major, serving thus until the muster out of the regiment, August 17, 1862, participating in both the campaigns in the Valley of Virginia, i. e., in 1861 under General Joseph E. Johnston, and in 1862 under Stonewall Jackson; also in the First Manassas battle and campaign in 1861 and in the Seven Days Battles below Richmond, in June and July, 1862. Near Front Royal, Va., during the battle on May 23d, 1862, he had the singular privilege of capturing his brother Charles and sending him to the rear with the other prisoners. The fight was between First Maryland Confederate and First Maryland Federal, and the latter was badly defeated, most of them were captured, altho
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