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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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news worth attention. Troops continue to arrive daily. A number of wounded Yankee prisoners arrived last evening. "Crew." The Fifth Virginia Regiment. Camp near Manassas, July 31. I take the liberty of asking a small space in your valuable paper to do honor to a regiment which has been entirely neglected in the accounts of the battle of July 21st. No notice has been taken of the Fifth Virginia Regiment or its gallant and brave commanders, Colonels Harper and Harman, and Major Baylor, or its heroic captains and men, who participated in that memorable conflict. The regiment was in the hottest of the fight for many hours. Captain A. W. Harman; of the Staunton Rifles, (Company G,) was the first man who took possession of Sherman's celebrated Battery, (six pieces,) and kept it. I should have noticed this before, but have been unable in consequence of sickness since the fight. Knowing that it is your principle to accord merit where merit is due, I hope you will oblige t
begged my friend for God's sake to give it to him; for that he himself had called upon a soldier from New York for water when his column was in retreat, and though it was at the risk of his life, he ran to the trench and brought it. How Col. Corcoran was captured. The war correspondent of the Charleston Mercury relates the following: Of individual experience there were scarcely room to speak. One lad, Oakley, from Alabama, taken prisoner, was tied; but when the enemy was fightihim, and started to his friends on the way. On an officer's prospecting, he went up towards him, and, when near enough, he ordered him to surrender; the officer did so, and young Oakley bore him in triumph in to headquarters. He proved to be Col. Corcoran. Capt. Kemper, the Artilleryman. A letter from the battle-field, published in the Charleston Mercury, mentions the fact that Capt. Kemper was taken prisoner during the fight. It happened in this way: Early in the day, when th
The war.facts and Incidents of the late Battled &c., &c. A correspondent, who was attached to Latham's Battery in the battle of July 21st, desires to correct a statement which has been published, to the effect that the battle was commenced at Srtillery were within miles of the bridge, nor in any manner connected with Gen. Evans' command. With two six-pounders of Latham's Battery, I was within one hundred yards of the bridge, with a full-complement of men for both guns, under command of Geness, courage, and ability in battle, he has few equals. "The two guns at the Stone Bridge were the left half of Captain Latham's Battery, commanded by Lieuts. Davidson and Leftwich. The Captain of the Washington Artillery is too gallant a man ten on both sides of the paper, which is a sufficient reason for its omission. His compliments to Gen. Evans, and to Captain Latham and his, men, are fully justified by their action on that memorable day. One other paragraph we copy. "Having as
Humphreys (search for this): article 1
itself. For coolness and courage, sake of management of the guns, and rapidity and certainly of fire, it could not be excelled. Every man in the 1st and 17th did his whole duty. From position they, with the artillery, bore the brunt of the whole fight. Where every one fought to well, it were invidious to particularize. Col. Moore, of the 1st, was wounded in the arm, and the command devolved on Lt. Col. Fry, who was assisted by Major Skinner.--Col. Corse, Lt. Col. Munford, and Adjutant Humphreys of the 17th, and Major Brent, were off the field in command in different parts of it. All these officers were in the thickest of the fight and displayed the almost coolness and courage. But nothing could exceed the cool determination and fearless daring of the officers and men of the line in the 17th Regiment. The writer could not obtain a list of the killed and wounded. The Captains seemed to be marked by the enemy. Captain Delaney, of the Fairfax Rifles was shot in the shoulde
ces and the overwhelming defeat of the United States Army." Well it does. Captain Adam McWille, of the Camden Rifles, reported killed in the late battle, was a son of Hon. Wm. McWille, ex-Governor of Mississippi, and long a resident of South Carolina. The Charleston Courier mentions a report that Lieut. Col. R. S. Ripley, of South Carolina, has resigned his commission, Cause not stated. A correspondent of the Richmond Enquirer expresses deep regret at the resignation of Gen. Tochman, of the Polish brigade, and hopes it will not be accepted by the President. A letter from Dechera, Tennessee; under date of 26th ult., states that the people in that section of the country are very much excited, and that hundreds are leaving for the war. One family is represented by six sons and three nephews, who are in the Confederate army. Two North Carolina soldiers--one named J. J. Stevens and the other named Woods — died in Petersburg a day or two since. Alexander Par
A. W. Harman (search for this): article 1
pace in your valuable paper to do honor to a regiment which has been entirely neglected in the accounts of the battle of July 21st. No notice has been taken of the Fifth Virginia Regiment or its gallant and brave commanders, Colonels Harper and Harman, and Major Baylor, or its heroic captains and men, who participated in that memorable conflict. The regiment was in the hottest of the fight for many hours. Captain A. W. Harman; of the Staunton Rifles, (Company G,) was the first man who took pCaptain A. W. Harman; of the Staunton Rifles, (Company G,) was the first man who took possession of Sherman's celebrated Battery, (six pieces,) and kept it. I should have noticed this before, but have been unable in consequence of sickness since the fight. Knowing that it is your principle to accord merit where merit is due, I hope you will oblige the Fifth by publishing the foregoing. Staunton. The Smith Blues. Capt. A G. Pendleton publishes the following in the Marion (Va) Visitor, in regard to his company in the Manassas battle: Thos. A. Oury was struck in
William Stone (search for this): article 1
e killed and wounded of this company, in the battle of Manassas: Killed--Capt. P. N. Hale, Creed B. Hale and Josiah Winn. Wounded — Wm. Waugh, Sidney Panter, Stephen K. Fielder, W. J. Cornutt, John K. Cornutt. Tray Stamper. Hugh Clark, George Sage — Waugh and Fielder supposed to be dangerously wounded. In a letter written two days after the battle, by Mr. Jno. Hale, he says that Capt. Hale, Creed B, Hale, and Josiah Winn, fell close by his side, and that Churchill Boyer, William Stone, Kenly Warwick, Kenly Cornutt and others, fought very bravely. He says that their regiment (the 4th Virginia, under Col. Preston,) succeeded in taking the enemy's battery. It was in that charge that those men fell. They saw they were about to be flanked by the enemy and to charge the enemy was the best chance; which they did with great success. He says that Col. Preston rushed up and mounted the battery and said, "well done my brave boys; the victory is ours" Col. Preston then turned
e the number of that company to about 100 strong, exclusive of those killed and wounded in the late battle. They were all choice recruits, just suited to join with that worthy little band of gallant heroes. The Grayson Dare-Devils. The following is a list of the killed and wounded of this company, in the battle of Manassas: Killed--Capt. P. N. Hale, Creed B. Hale and Josiah Winn. Wounded — Wm. Waugh, Sidney Panter, Stephen K. Fielder, W. J. Cornutt, John K. Cornutt. Tray Stamper. Hugh Clark, George Sage — Waugh and Fielder supposed to be dangerously wounded. In a letter written two days after the battle, by Mr. Jno. Hale, he says that Capt. Hale, Creed B, Hale, and Josiah Winn, fell close by his side, and that Churchill Boyer, William Stone, Kenly Warwick, Kenly Cornutt and others, fought very bravely. He says that their regiment (the 4th Virginia, under Col. Preston,) succeeded in taking the enemy's battery. It was in that charge that those men fell. They
Massenburg (search for this): article 1
, therefore, is justly due to that gallant little band, the Thomas Artillery, who, for seven hours, under the range of the enemy's battery, stood bravely by their guns, pouring shot thick and fact, and with good effect, into the enemy's ranks, firing, as I understand, seven hundred and odd shot. Their ammunition being exhausted, they were ordered to retire, which they did in good order, having sustained a loss of two killed--Lieut. Macon and private John B. Dixon; and five wounded--Serg't Massenburg, Corp'ls. Thos. McCurdy and Topp, privates Waller and Davidson; the battery a loss of an ammunition chest, of one caisson, (which was struck by one of the enemy's shells and blown up,) twenty-five horses, killed, wounded and missing. They arrived, after a forced march from Winchester under Gen. Johnston, on the battle-field about eight o'clock Sunday morning, without food for men or horses, and remained near the field of battle the whole day, and at sun down took up their march for t
he paper, which is a sufficient reason for its omission. His compliments to Gen. Evans, and to Captain Latham and his, men, are fully justified by their action on that memorable day. One other paragraph we copy. "Having ascertained that Lieut. Dempsey, of Company G, New York Second Regiment, reported in the Baltimore Sun as killed, was in one of the hundred hospitals convenient to Manassas, Stone Bridge and Centreville, I went to see him, and found he had a dangerous wound in the head, caused by a bursting bomb. He told me he had a wife living in New York city, and I insert this for her benefit, trusting it may meet her eye; and will venture a piece of advice. In time to come it would be well for Mrs. Dempsey to keep the Lieutenant at home, and leave us to manage our biggers as suits us best." A correspondent at the University of Virginia sends us the following account of an exponent of private John Armstrong, of the Berkeley Border Guard, (Capt. Nadenbush,) Col.Allen's (2
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