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he Secretary, John M. Cooley was called for, who addressed the meeting in an able and eloquent speech of about twenty minutes. He condemned the policy of the Administration; spoke of the many constitutional violations and usurpations of the President; did not look upon our Government as a consolidated one, but as a Government of limited powers, deriving its powers from the people. He thought the Union or the Constitution did not impair our State rights, his views being the same as those of Madison, Jay and Hamilton. His speech was well received throughout, and he took his seat amid great applause. Dr. J. T. Hays was then called for, who made a brilliant speech of fifteen minutes--portrayed the policy of the Black Republican party, the past as well as the present; could see no difference between John Brown and Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's spee
A. Osborn (search for this): article 3
fficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of the General Government, and, as such, the Supreme Court had as much right and power to set aside the functions of the President, as the President had a right or power to set aside the functions of the Supreme Court. Looked upon the Consti
omising opposition to the war, and claim that the true issues before the people of Maryland are, not "Union or Disunion, but, on the one hand, peace, with returning prosperity, and the restoration of the Constitution and laws; and on the other civil war, endless and oppressive taxation, and the total loss of constitutional liberty." Great peace meeting at Ithaca. On Saturday last one of the largest meetings was held at Ithaca, New York, that has ever assembled in that town. The Town Hall was, crowded to excess, and so large was the number of persons pressing for admission that, on motion of Mr. Chauncy Grant, they adjourned to the Park. Here they were addressed by Messrs. McDow and Halsey, who advocated peace in the strongest terms. The meeting was composed of the most respectable citizens and farmers from the neighborhood, all of whom were evidently of a very different class from those Northerners who now congregate at Washington. The muddle of the New York press.
J. A. Preston (search for this): article 3
Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of the General Government, and, as such, the Supreme Court had as much right and power to set aside t
J. K. Sappington (search for this): article 3
arge one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of the General Government, and, as such, the Supreme Court had as much right and power to set aside the functions of the President, as the President had a right or power to set aside
George Stephenson (search for this): article 3
he past as well as the present; could see no difference between John Brown and Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of the General Governm
W. A. Patterson (search for this): article 3
es--portrayed the policy of the Black Republican party, the past as well as the present; could see no difference between John Brown and Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ord
Thomas Jeffry (search for this): article 3
The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of the General Government, and, as such, the Supreme Court had as much right and power to set aside the functions of the President, as the President had a right or power to set aside the functions of the Supreme Court. Looked upon the Constitution as the
Samuel Sutton (search for this): article 3
publican party, the past as well as the present; could see no difference between John Brown and Lincoln, except that one represented and led on a small force, the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of th
James Chesney (search for this): article 3
the other a very large one; wished for a speedy termination of our national difficulties. The Doctor's speech met with a warm reception and much applause. On motion the meeting proceeded to ballot for delegates, when the following gentlemen were declared to be elected: Delegates.--W. A. Patterson, Major W. B. Stephenson, Samuel Sutton, George Stephenson, R. H. Smith, Dr. J. T. Hays, Daniel Martin, John M. Cooley, Dr. J. A. Preston, B. F. Heath. Alternates.--W. B. Michael, James Chesney, Dr. J. K. Sappington, John P. Dallam, Bennett Tilbert, R. Henly, A. Osborn, Thomas Jeffry, James Stephenson. W. Ewing, Jr., was then called for, and responded in a speech of twenty minutes. Spoke of the different branches of the General Government; regarded the Supreme Court as a co-ordinate and not a subordinate branch of the General Government, and, as such, the Supreme Court had as much right and power to set aside the functions of the President, as the President had a right or
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