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H. A. Benham (search for this): article 1
ed to send any letters they may desire, subject to the inspection of a Federal officer. Signed this 11th day of April, 1862. Chas. H. Olmstead, Col. First Vol. Reg't of Georgia, Fort Pulaski. Q. A. Gilmore, Brigadier-General Volunteers, commanding United States forces, Tybee Island, Ga. The document was sent to the district commander, and accompanied by the following communication from the General of the attacking brigade: Fort Pulaski, Ga., April 11, 1862. General H. A. Benham, Commanding Northern District Department of the South, Tybee Island, Ga.: Sir --I have the honor to transmit herewith the terms of capitulation for the surrender to the United States of Fort Pulaski, Ga., signed by me this 11th day of April, 1862. I trust these terms will receive your approval, they being substantially those authorized by you as commander of the district. The fort hoisted the white flag at a quarter before two o'clock this afternoon, after a resistance
Lew Wallace (search for this): article 1
f who particularly distinguished than I possibly can. a duty, however, to a gallant and Brig.-Gen. W. T. Sherman, to mention, that he not only was in command during the entire of the action, but displayed great judge skill, and management of his men, severely wounded in the hand on day, his place was never vacant. He wounded, and had three horses under him. this mention of a gallant officer management is intended to the other commanders--Major-Generals John A. and Lew Wallace, and Brigade-Generals S. Hurlbut, B. M. Prentiss, E. L. Wallace — all of whom main their places with credit to themselves Gen. Prentiss was taken Prisoner the first day's action, and Gen. W. H. place was severely and probably wounded. His Assistant Adjutants General Wm. McMichael, is missing, and probably taken prisoner. * * * * * The country will have to mourn the loss of brave men who fell at the battle of or Shiloh, more properly. loss in killed and wounded will
han I possibly can. a duty, however, to a gallant and Brig.-Gen. W. T. Sherman, to mention, that he not only was in command during the entire of the action, but displayed great judge skill, and management of his men, severely wounded in the hand on day, his place was never vacant. He wounded, and had three horses under him. this mention of a gallant officer management is intended to the other commanders--Major-Generals John A. and Lew Wallace, and Brigade-Generals S. Hurlbut, B. M. Prentiss, E. L. Wallace — all of whom main their places with credit to themselves Gen. Prentiss was taken Prisoner the first day's action, and Gen. W. H. place was severely and probably wounded. His Assistant Adjutants General Wm. McMichael, is missing, and probably taken prisoner. * * * * * The country will have to mourn the loss of brave men who fell at the battle of or Shiloh, more properly. loss in killed and wounded will in a day or two; at present I can
s: We have received authentic intelligence from Pocotaligo, fully confirming the statement brought us on Tuesday by our special "Reliable Gentleman," and mentioned in our issue of Wednesday. The facts are these: Early on Tuesday morning Capt. Leake, of the fine Virginia battery, went to Port Royal Ferry with two field pieces, and fired into a small house on the farther side of the river, which was known to be occupied by the enemy's pickets. Eight rushed out and fled.--Several shots were fired after them, and some of Capt. Leake's men say they saw the Yankees pick up and carry off one of their number, whether killed or wounded is not known; nor is it known whether any were killed in the house. From York river. We copy the following from the Gloucester Point letter of April 22d, in the Lynchburg Virginian: I have just returned from a tour of observation down the river, a report having reached us about midnight, that fifty vessels were anchored in the mouth of th
Shirkusen (search for this): article 1
ith four 20-pounder and a battery of rifled guns.-- a deep and impassable ravine for cavalry, and very difficult for this point, no troops were except the necessary artillerists, infantry force for their support moment the advance of column a part of the division Nelson, arrived, and the two General both being present, an advance immediately made upon the point of the enemy were soon driven back.-- much is due to the presence of Tyler and Lexington, and their Captains Gwyn and Shirkusen, the night the division under Gens. and McCook arrived. New Wallace, at Crumple Landing, was ordered at an early hour morning to hold his division in readily moved in any direction to which it was ordered. At about eleven o'clock was delivered to move it up to Pittsburg owing to its being led by a circuit did not arrive in time to take part action. the night all was quiet, and feeling moral advantage would be gained being the attacking party, an advance as soon
beats upon all with equal fury, and threatens all with the same late. Before we are safely through, it would be well to trust in God and keep our faith strong and firm in the helmsman who directs the ship. The last Loans in the battle of Shiloh. A Texas Ranger, who was wounded in the skirmish the day after the grand battle of Shifton, communicates to the New Orleans True Delta the following authentic account of the affair: Two hundred Texas Rangers, under command of Major Harrison, acting as a rear guard to our army, together with about one hundred cavalry from Colonel Adams's and Colonel Forrest a regiments, (the number from each I do not know,) discovered the enemy in force of one regiment, and one battalion of infantry and three hundred cavalry, about one or one and a half miles beyond Michie's (or Micky's) house, on Tuesday afternoon. The enemy had thrown forward their infantry battalion, deploying skirmishers and sharpshooters in a deserted encampment, about
and battle of Shifton, communicates to the New Orleans True Delta the following authentic account of the affair: Two hundred Texas Rangers, under command of Major Harrison, acting as a rear guard to our army, together with about one hundred cavalry from Colonel Adams's and Colonel Forrest a regiments, (the number from each I do not know,) discovered the enemy in force of one regiment, and one battalion of infantry and three hundred cavalry, about one or one and a half miles beyond Michie's (or Micky's) house, on Tuesday afternoon. The enemy had thrown forward their infantry battalion, deploying skirmishers and sharpshooters in a deserted encampment, about two hundred yards from our cavalry, which had been formed in line of battle in an old field. The order was given and the charge was made upon the battalion, which, after a sturdy resistance of two or three minutes, broke and fled in confusion. The enemy's cavalry had been formed in line of battle an hundred or two yards i
up until night. When having forced the entire line to nearly half-way from their camps to at a late hour in the afternoon a effort was made by the enemy to and get possession of the land seaports, &c. was guarded by the gun boats Captains Gwyn and Shir commanding, with four 20-pounder and a battery of rifled guns.-- a deep and impassable ravine for cavalry, and very difficult for this point, no troops were except the necessary artillerists, infantry force for their support mnce of column a part of the division Nelson, arrived, and the two General both being present, an advance immediately made upon the point of the enemy were soon driven back.-- much is due to the presence of Tyler and Lexington, and their Captains Gwyn and Shirkusen, the night the division under Gens. and McCook arrived. New Wallace, at Crumple Landing, was ordered at an early hour morning to hold his division in readily moved in any direction to which it was ordered. At abo
B. M. Prentiss (search for this): article 1
y, his place was never vacant. He wounded, and had three horses under him. this mention of a gallant officer management is intended to the other commanders--Major-Generals John A. and Lew Wallace, and Brigade-Generals S. Hurlbut, B. M. Prentiss, E. L. Wallace — all of whom main their places with credit to themselves Gen. Prentiss was taken Prisoner the first day's action, and Gen. W. H. place was severely and probably wounded. His Assistant Adjutants General Wm. McMichael, isGen. Prentiss was taken Prisoner the first day's action, and Gen. W. H. place was severely and probably wounded. His Assistant Adjutants General Wm. McMichael, is missing, and probably taken prisoner. * * * * * The country will have to mourn the loss of brave men who fell at the battle of or Shiloh, more properly. loss in killed and wounded will in a day or two; at present I can it approximately at 1,500 killed and wounded. of artillery was great — many pieces disabled by the enemy's shot, and some all their horses and many men. There probably not less than two hundred killed. loss of the enemy in killed and left the
on the Forked Deer river. The transports were enabled to ascend the river some distance, owing to the high stage of the water. The forces there landed will doubtless seek to invest the Fort by land, and will co-operate with the gunboats on the Mississippi. Fort Pillow, as you have heretofore been informed, is situated just above the mouth of the Harchie river, and is seventy miles above Memphis by water and thirty by land. The enemy is moving out also from the lower Tennessee, through Paris, across the country towards the Mississippi. They destroyed the depot buildings at the Henry Station, on the Memphis and Ohio road, on Saturday, together with five car loads of Government stores. Their intention is supposed to be to occupy that part of the State lying above Fort Pillow and between the lower Tennessee and Mississippi rivers, and gradually to advance on Memphis. Founding the Yankees across Port Royal Ferry. The Charleston Mercury, of the 24th, says: We have re
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