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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 26, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Russia (Russia) (search for this): article 1
the 18th and Cincinnati papers of the 19th have been received. They furnish the following summary of news. Several new points in Kentucky have been occupied by rebel guerrillas Richmond 23 miles from Lexington is now occupied by three thousand rebels. Eighty Confederates, supposed to be on their way to join Morgan, a ere captured at Mammoth Cave. Bodies of cavalry, supposed to be the advance of a large force, have appeared at London and Somerset Bull Nelson was at Nashville on the 18th. Trains are running through from Nashville on the Chattanooga road. A large body of rebels, collected in Jackson Mo., threaten, an attack on Kansas City. The Kansas militia has been ordered out en masse. At the ovation given to Col. Corcoran at Washington. Col. Wilcox declared that the rebellion was stronger now than ever. Cassius M. Clay has been assigned to an important command west of the Mississippi. The Emperor of Russia expects to visit the United States.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
the 18th and Cincinnati papers of the 19th have been received. They furnish the following summary of news. Several new points in Kentucky have been occupied by rebel guerrillas Richmond 23 miles from Lexington is now occupied by three thousand rebels. Eighty Confederates, supposed to be on their way to join Morgan, a ere captured at Mammoth Cave. Bodies of cavalry, supposed to be the advance of a large force, have appeared at London and Somerset Bull Nelson was at Nashville on the 18th. Trains are running through from Nashville on the Chattanooga road. A large body of rebels, collected in Jackson Mo., threaten, an attack on Kansas City. The Kansas militia has been ordered out en masse. At the ovation given to Col. Corcoran at Washington. Col. Wilcox declared that the rebellion was stronger now than ever. Cassius M. Clay has been assigned to an important command west of the Mississippi. The Emperor of Russia expects to visit the United States.
Milton (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
the 18th and Cincinnati papers of the 19th have been received. They furnish the following summary of news. Several new points in Kentucky have been occupied by rebel guerrillas Richmond 23 miles from Lexington is now occupied by three thousand rebels. Eighty Confederates, supposed to be on their way to join Morgan, a ere captured at Mammoth Cave. Bodies of cavalry, supposed to be the advance of a large force, have appeared at London and Somerset Bull Nelson was at Nashville on the 18th. Trains are running through from Nashville on the Chattanooga road. A large body of rebels, collected in Jackson Mo., threaten, an attack on Kansas City. The Kansas militia has been ordered out en masse. At the ovation given to Col. Corcoran at Washington. Col. Wilcox declared that the rebellion was stronger now than ever. Cassius M. Clay has been assigned to an important command west of the Mississippi. The Emperor of Russia expects to visit the United States.
Mammoth Cave, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 1
the North. Mobile, Aug. 25. --A special dispatch to the Advertiser and Register, dated Tupelo, yesterday, says: Louisville papers of the 18th and Cincinnati papers of the 19th have been received. They furnish the following summary of news. Several new points in Kentucky have been occupied by rebel guerrillas Richmond 23 miles from Lexington is now occupied by three thousand rebels. Eighty Confederates, supposed to be on their way to join Morgan, a ere captured at Mammoth Cave. Bodies of cavalry, supposed to be the advance of a large force, have appeared at London and Somerset Bull Nelson was at Nashville on the 18th. Trains are running through from Nashville on the Chattanooga road. A large body of rebels, collected in Jackson Mo., threaten, an attack on Kansas City. The Kansas militia has been ordered out en masse. At the ovation given to Col. Corcoran at Washington. Col. Wilcox declared that the rebellion was stronger now than ever. C
ve policy. From all indications this policy is to be persisted in. Under the stimulus of overwhelming terror our Congress passed a Conscription law, and it saved the country. They then dispersed to parts unknown, and left the country to take care of itself. The immediate danger is over. They have re-assembled, and the first effort of the session is directed to the undoing of all that the Conscription has done. The President tells us, in substance, that we do not want any more men; Gen. Foote introduces a bill to upset the Conscription law, and the members are spending the precious time that should be spent in preparing to meet the emergency which is most assuredly approaching, in idle talk. We only hope they may not find out, in the next sixty days; that they have "no more business before them," and "skedaddle," as they did last spring, leaving the capital of the Confederacy in danger a second time from an irruption of the Northern barbarians. History is repeating itself af
should be spent in preparing to meet the emergency which is most assuredly approaching, in idle talk. We only hope they may not find out, in the next sixty days; that they have "no more business before them," and "skedaddle," as they did last spring, leaving the capital of the Confederacy in danger a second time from an irruption of the Northern barbarians. History is repeating itself after an interval of only a single year. We are about to re-enact the scenes of the post-Manassas era. Lincoln is rapidly raising his 600,000 men, besides building a fleet of Merrimacs and Monitors. We are laughing at him as we were last year, and indulging ourselves in the delusion that the men will not be forthcoming. In six weeks the frost will be here, and upon the back of it, nothing is more probable than that we shall have the Yankees once more. To suppose, after the experience of last year, that the 600,000 Yankees will not be forthcoming, is to indulge in a dream, which it were gross flat
August 24th (search for this): article 1
s quick when spoken to. George left on the 6th of August; calls himself George Taylor. Richard left on the 24th of August; calls himself Richard Twyman; is dark brown; wears goatee and moustache. Richard left on the 24th of August; ca24th of August; calls himself Richard Henry Lee; brown color; had on a brown felt hat with curve top. Isaac left on the 24th of August; calls himself Isaac Moore; stammers in his speech. George left on the 24th of August. The above slaves having been r24th of August; calls himself Isaac Moore; stammers in his speech. George left on the 24th of August. The above slaves having been recently purchased in Richmond, a more particular description will be given as soon as their original owners can be heard from. E. D. Wilburn. Sup't Section Piedmont Railroad. au 26--ts At Danville. Greensboro' papers will please copy24th of August. The above slaves having been recently purchased in Richmond, a more particular description will be given as soon as their original owners can be heard from. E. D. Wilburn. Sup't Section Piedmont Railroad. au 26--ts At Danville. Greensboro' papers will please copy.
Richard Henry Lee (search for this): article 1
delivered in any jail where they can be secured: Isaiah left on August 1st; calls himself Isaiah Fanton. Anderson left on August 3d. Willis left on the 6th of August; calls himself Willis Hunter; is light brown, spare made, and speaks quick when spoken to. George left on the 6th of August; calls himself George Taylor. Richard left on the 24th of August; calls himself Richard Twyman; is dark brown; wears goatee and moustache. Richard left on the 24th of August; calls himself Richard Henry Lee; brown color; had on a brown felt hat with curve top. Isaac left on the 24th of August; calls himself Isaac Moore; stammers in his speech. George left on the 24th of August. The above slaves having been recently purchased in Richmond, a more particular description will be given as soon as their original owners can be heard from. E. D. Wilburn. Sup't Section Piedmont Railroad. au 26--ts At Danville. Greensboro' papers will please copy.
Runaways. --The following named slaves left the Piedmont Railroad, at Danville, and are now at large. A reward of $25 each will be paid for their delivery at Danville, if taken in the State, or $50 if taken in another State, or a liberal reward if delivered in any jail where they can be secured: Isaiah left on August 1st; calls himself Isaiah Fanton. Anderson left on August 3d. Willis left on the 6th of August; calls himself Willis Hunter; is light brown, spare made, and speaks quick when spoken to. George left on the 6th of August; calls himself George Taylor. Richard left on the 24th of August; calls himself Richard Twyman; is dark brown; wears goatee and moustache. Richard left on the 24th of August; calls himself Richard Henry Lee; brown color; had on a brown felt hat with curve top. Isaac left on the 24th of August; calls himself Isaac Moore; stammers in his speech. George left on the 24th of August. The above slaves having been
Runaways. --The following named slaves left the Piedmont Railroad, at Danville, and are now at large. A reward of $25 each will be paid for their delivery at Danville, if taken in the State, or $50 if taken in another State, or a liberal reward if delivered in any jail where they can be secured: Isaiah left on August 1st; calls himself Isaiah Fanton. Anderson left on August 3d. Willis left on the 6th of August; calls himself Willis Hunter; is light brown, spare made, and speaks quick when spoken to. George left on the 6th of August; calls himself George Taylor. Richard left on the 24th of August; calls himself Richard Twyman; is dark brown; wears goatee and moustache. Richard left on the 24th of August; calls himself Richard Henry Lee; brown color; had on a brown felt hat with curve top. Isaac left on the 24th of August; calls himself Isaac Moore; stammers in his speech. George left on the 24th of August. The above slaves having been
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