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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 26, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 467 total hits in 239 results.

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Greensboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
f delivered in any jail where they can be secured: Isaiah left on August 1st; calls himself Isaiah Fanton. Anderson left on August 3d. Willis left on the 6th of August; calls himself Willis Hunter; is light brown, spare made, and speaks quick when spoken to. George left on the 6th of August; calls himself George Taylor. Richard left on the 24th of August; calls himself Richard Twyman; is dark brown; wears goatee and moustache. Richard left on the 24th of August; calls himself Richard Henry Lee; brown color; had on a brown felt hat with curve top. Isaac left on the 24th of August; calls himself Isaac Moore; stammers in his speech. George left on the 24th of August. The above slaves having been recently purchased in Richmond, a more particular description will be given as soon as their original owners can be heard from. E. D. Wilburn. Sup't Section Piedmont Railroad. au 26--ts At Danville. Greensboro' papers will please copy.
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Runaways. --The following named slaves left the Piedmont Railroad, at Danville, and are now at large. A reward of $25 each will be paid for their delivery at Danville, if taken in the State, or $50 if taken in another State, or a liberal reward if delivered in any jail where they can be secured: Isaiah left on August 1Danville, if taken in the State, or $50 if taken in another State, or a liberal reward if delivered in any jail where they can be secured: Isaiah left on August 1st; calls himself Isaiah Fanton. Anderson left on August 3d. Willis left on the 6th of August; calls himself Willis Hunter; is light brown, spare made, and speaks quick when spoken to. George left on the 6th of August; calls himself George Taylor. Richard left on the 24th of August; calls himself Richard Twymanech. George left on the 24th of August. The above slaves having been recently purchased in Richmond, a more particular description will be given as soon as their original owners can be heard from. E. D. Wilburn. Sup't Section Piedmont Railroad. au 26--ts At Danville. Greensboro' papers will please copy.
McClellan (search for this): article 2
McClellan's Departure. Dr. Minge, who has been at Westover nearly ever since the arrival of McClellan's army there has arrived in this city. He reports that the last of the Yankee army has left, leaving behind a number of stragglers and deserters. The ground where they last camped is strewn with cast-off uniforms, broken and injured muskets, crackers, &c. The doctor saw nineteen Yankees throw their muskets in the water and swim a creek in deserting. With the exception of restriction upMcClellan's army there has arrived in this city. He reports that the last of the Yankee army has left, leaving behind a number of stragglers and deserters. The ground where they last camped is strewn with cast-off uniforms, broken and injured muskets, crackers, &c. The doctor saw nineteen Yankees throw their muskets in the water and swim a creek in deserting. With the exception of restriction upon his liberty, Dr. Minge was well treated by the general officers with whom he came in contact.--Nearly all of them, particularly Gens. Kearney and Fitzjohn Porter, behaved as gentlemen. The former remarked one day that the Confederates had one advantage over the Federal, and that was, if one of their Generals was killed they had an abundance of good ones to fill his place, which was not the case with their enemies. He also remarked when he arrived at Westover, after the seven day's fighting
his city. He reports that the last of the Yankee army has left, leaving behind a number of stragglers and deserters. The ground where they last camped is strewn with cast-off uniforms, broken and injured muskets, crackers, &c. The doctor saw nineteen Yankees throw their muskets in the water and swim a creek in deserting. With the exception of restriction upon his liberty, Dr. Minge was well treated by the general officers with whom he came in contact.--Nearly all of them, particularly Gens. Kearney and Fitzjohn Porter, behaved as gentlemen. The former remarked one day that the Confederates had one advantage over the Federal, and that was, if one of their Generals was killed they had an abundance of good ones to fill his place, which was not the case with their enemies. He also remarked when he arrived at Westover, after the seven day's fighting, that by all the rules of war there would be a battle there in six hours, and offered to send Dr. M.'s wife away from there for safety.
rly destroyed. Dr. M. was sent for by one of the Generals to estimate and receive compensation for his property which was seized for the use of the army; but learning that the oath of allegiance was one of the conditions, promptly told the officer that he gave up all, and, more than that, would give up his life, before he would take it. Desertions were numerous, and one Yankee soldier paid as high as $40 in gold for an old suit of citizens' clothes, in which to pass his picket. On the first of the four very hot days during the stay of the army, the sick list was 365, and by the fourth day it ran up to 1,068. The country is literally dotted with Yankee graves, many of them hardly covering the bodies. From one he saw the nose of a corpse protruding, and from another a pair of legs encased in boots. Some of the gunboats are still lying off Westover, and on one of them was a son of Mrs. James Selden, who is in the U. S. Navy. The commander of the fleet sent word ashore a da
Fitzjohn Porter (search for this): article 2
ts that the last of the Yankee army has left, leaving behind a number of stragglers and deserters. The ground where they last camped is strewn with cast-off uniforms, broken and injured muskets, crackers, &c. The doctor saw nineteen Yankees throw their muskets in the water and swim a creek in deserting. With the exception of restriction upon his liberty, Dr. Minge was well treated by the general officers with whom he came in contact.--Nearly all of them, particularly Gens. Kearney and Fitzjohn Porter, behaved as gentlemen. The former remarked one day that the Confederates had one advantage over the Federal, and that was, if one of their Generals was killed they had an abundance of good ones to fill his place, which was not the case with their enemies. He also remarked when he arrived at Westover, after the seven day's fighting, that by all the rules of war there would be a battle there in six hours, and offered to send Dr. M.'s wife away from there for safety. All seemed surprise
McClellan's Departure. Dr. Minge, who has been at Westover nearly ever since the arrival of McClellan's army there has arrived in this city. He reports that the last of the Yankee army has left, leaving behind a number of stragglers and deserters. The ground where they last camped is strewn with cast-off uniforms, broken and injured muskets, crackers, &c. The doctor saw nineteen Yankees throw their muskets in the water and swim a creek in deserting. With the exception of restriction upon his liberty, Dr. Minge was well treated by the general officers with whom he came in contact.--Nearly all of them, particularly Gens. Kearney and Fitzjohn Porter, behaved as gentlemen. The former remarked one day that the Confederates had one advantage over the Federal, and that was, if one of their Generals was killed they had an abundance of good ones to fill his place, which was not the case with their enemies. He also remarked when he arrived at Westover, after the seven day's fighting
James Selden (search for this): article 2
for safety. All seemed surprised that the Confederates did not pursue the Federal army. When our artillery shelled the camp at Westover, at night, all in Mrs. Selden's house retreated into the cellar; but, upon a Yankee officer declaring that if a candle, left burning up stairs, was not put out, he would "blow, the d — d hou corpse protruding, and from another a pair of legs encased in boots. Some of the gunboats are still lying off Westover, and on one of them was a son of Mrs. James Selden, who is in the U. S. Navy. The commander of the fleet sent word ashore a day or two since that if he saw parties of more than three or four persons on land,boots. Some of the gunboats are still lying off Westover, and on one of them was a son of Mrs. James Selden, who is in the U. S. Navy. The commander of the fleet sent word ashore a day or two since that if he saw parties of more than three or four persons on land, that he would shell the mansion (Mrs. Selden's) at Westover.
Westover (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
McClellan's Departure. Dr. Minge, who has been at Westover nearly ever since the arrival of McClellan's army there has arrived in this city. He reports that the last of the Yankee army has leftfill his place, which was not the case with their enemies. He also remarked when he arrived at Westover, after the seven day's fighting, that by all the rules of war there would be a battle there in t the Confederates did not pursue the Federal army. When our artillery shelled the camp at Westover, at night, all in Mrs. Selden's house retreated into the cellar; but, upon a Yankee officer decand from another a pair of legs encased in boots. Some of the gunboats are still lying off Westover, and on one of them was a son of Mrs. James Selden, who is in the U. S. Navy. The commander of Navy. The commander of the fleet sent word ashore a day or two since that if he saw parties of more than three or four persons on land, that he would shell the mansion (Mrs. Selden's) at Westover.
Mary Thompson (search for this): article 2
Police matters. --At the Police Court, yesterday, Sarah, slave of J. T. Bowen, was sent on to answer the charge of stealing a gold ring, worth $30.--Milly, a negro woman, employed by Miss Mary Thompson, was charged wish stealing three dresses from her mistress and a get of Jewelry, She, too, was sent on for trial.
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