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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 485 total hits in 239 results.

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West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ers.] "The Union as it was!" That means to bring back the States in precisely the same condition they were in when the rebellion was inaugurated. How are you going to get Missouri back so? The people of that State have, unsolicited and uninterfered with by any power, inaugurated a system of measures for the emancipation of slaves. How are you going to get it back as it was? These people want to have the Union as it was! And what are you going to do with that little State nestled in Western Virginia, formed by loyal men, which has adopted a series of measures to rid itself of slavery? How are you to get it back as it was, I should like to know? [Cheers.] I know they mourn over it, and regret their inability to bring back the Union as it was. Now if there are any men in your goodly city of New York who have any tears to shed over such a result, I am half inclined to think they must be crocodile tears, --but if they are not and you have got those who have tears to shed for "the Uni
Newport (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 1
of money on board. The capture was complete, not a vessel, escaping. The crews were all made prisoners and brought on board the Alliance, where they were detained from Friday night till Sunday. On Monday morning the schooners; with the exception of the Alexander, were taken out to sea. The Alexander was run ashore and abandoned. The other vessels were cut adrift off the Capes. One of them — the John J. Houseman — was afterwards boarded by the schooner Envoy, and brought into Newport, Rhode Island. The fishermen, after a few days' detention, were set free, and they report that when last seen the raiders on the Alliance were beating off the Capes, it then blowing hard from east northeast. The negro cook of the House man was killed by the raiders. It appears that he attempted to escape, jumping overboard and swimming for his life; but unfortunately for the poor fellow, they fired upon him, and his courage failing his, he returned. They then shot him and threw him overboard,
Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
g between Gen. Gillmore and Admiral Dahlgren: An impression having gained considerable ground in the North to the effect that Gen. Gillmore and Admiral Dahlgren are, and have been, at variance in regard to the matter of prosecuting military operations before Charleston, it may be well to state on the best authority that no foundation exists for such a belief. Both parties well understood before embarking on the expedition the work each was expected to perform. That the capture of Morris Island and the reduction of Fort Sumter ended the programme laid out for Gen. Gillmore, is freely admitted by all concerned. A correspondence passed some time ago between the two commanders relative to the exact condition of Sumter, Gen. Gillmore maintaining that the fort was practically and effectually silenced, while Admiral Dahlgren entertained a suspicion that the structure contained guns in working order on the channel side. Although this difference of opinion existed, the parties e
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ht. They are stalling their Russian ally with sugar plumbs. On Wednesday they took the officers from the Russian frigates in the harbor at New York and carried them to the City Hall, to receive the freedom of the city. The Times thus describes the scene: As soon as the guests and committees were transferred to the carriages the procession moved. The line of march was through 23d street to Fifth avenue, down Fifth avenue to 14th street, through 14th street to Broadway, and down Broadway to City Hall. Throughout the whole distance the windows of buildings on either side of the street, the porches, balconies, and sidewalks, were thronged by citizens and ladies, anxious by their presence to do honor to the distinguished guests who represent among us the sympathies of a friendly Government in Europe. Residences and business establishments were decorated with flags and banners, among which there was a frequent display of the Russian cross. As the procession moved past ha
izens for visiting the United States might prevent the Confederate Government, in the exercise of its undoubted powers, from sending agents to the United States on missions of public policy and importance in carrying on the war.--Hence the Constitution has wisely reposed exclusive jurisdiction in this matter in the Confederate Government, and the party here having acted under the authority and by the permission and approval of the Confederate States Government, which is the Government of Virginia as to her foreign relations and intercourse, is not amenable to any other jurisdiction in the premises. The Mayor, not agreeing with Mr. Howard in his opinion as to the law governing the rights of the party involved, ordered her to receive twenty stripes, and declared his intention to whip her out of the Commonwealth, as decided by the Hustings Court; but deferred the execution of the sentence till Monday, so as to enable the parties to apply to Judge Meredith for a writ of prohibition.
ls for final decision. A free negress named Martha Hobson, for having visited Massachusetts and returned to Virginia, in violation of the law, was ordered by the Mayor to give bond in $500 to leave the Commonwealth within ten days, never to return.--From this decision appeal was taken to the Hustings Court, where the Mayor's decision was substantially sustained the Court merely reducing the amount of the bond to $100. The prisoner, when she want to Massachusetts, was given a passport by General Winder, and, returning on a flag of truce boat, was received by Commissioner Ould. Since the decision of the Hustings Court prisoner's husband has made efforts to get a passport for her, she consenting to return to the North, where her children are at school, but has been refused by the authorities.--To obey the orders of the Court, therefore, she must run the blockade — a feat not easily accomplished. John Howard, Esq., the prisoner's counsel, took the ground that neither the Mayor n
ited Massachusetts and returned to Virginia, in violation of the law, was ordered by the Mayor to give bond in $500 to leave the Commonwealth within ten days, never to return.--From this decision appeal was taken to the Hustings Court, where the Mayor's decision was substantially sustained the Court merely reducing the amount of the bond to $100. The prisoner, when she want to Massachusetts, was given a passport by General Winder, and, returning on a flag of truce boat, was received by Commissioner Ould. Since the decision of the Hustings Court prisoner's husband has made efforts to get a passport for her, she consenting to return to the North, where her children are at school, but has been refused by the authorities.--To obey the orders of the Court, therefore, she must run the blockade — a feat not easily accomplished. John Howard, Esq., the prisoner's counsel, took the ground that neither the Mayor nor the Hustings Court had, or could have, any jurisdiction over the matte
John Howard (search for this): article 1
a passport for her, she consenting to return to the North, where her children are at school, but has been refused by the authorities.--To obey the orders of the Court, therefore, she must run the blockade — a feat not easily accomplished. John Howard, Esq., the prisoner's counsel, took the ground that neither the Mayor nor the Hustings Court had, or could have, any jurisdiction over the matter; that by the Constitution of the Confederate States the exclusive regulation of the foreign relatd by the permission and approval of the Confederate States Government, which is the Government of Virginia as to her foreign relations and intercourse, is not amenable to any other jurisdiction in the premises. The Mayor, not agreeing with Mr. Howard in his opinion as to the law governing the rights of the party involved, ordered her to receive twenty stripes, and declared his intention to whip her out of the Commonwealth, as decided by the Hustings Court; but deferred the execution of the
Martha Hobson (search for this): article 1
Important Legal case. --A very important case came before the Mayor yesterday, which will probably get to the Court of Appeals for final decision. A free negress named Martha Hobson, for having visited Massachusetts and returned to Virginia, in violation of the law, was ordered by the Mayor to give bond in $500 to leave the Commonwealth within ten days, never to return.--From this decision appeal was taken to the Hustings Court, where the Mayor's decision was substantially sustained the Court merely reducing the amount of the bond to $100. The prisoner, when she want to Massachusetts, was given a passport by General Winder, and, returning on a flag of truce boat, was received by Commissioner Ould. Since the decision of the Hustings Court prisoner's husband has made efforts to get a passport for her, she consenting to return to the North, where her children are at school, but has been refused by the authorities.--To obey the orders of the Court, therefore, she must run the
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
Important Legal case. --A very important case came before the Mayor yesterday, which will probably get to the Court of Appeals for final decision. A free negress named Martha Hobson, for having visited Massachusetts and returned to Virginia, in violation of the law, was ordered by the Mayor to give bond in $500 to leave the Commonwealth within ten days, never to return.--From this decision appeal was taken to the Hustings Court, where the Mayor's decision was substantially sustained the Court merely reducing the amount of the bond to $100. The prisoner, when she want to Massachusetts, was given a passport by General Winder, and, returning on a flag of truce boat, was received by Commissioner Ould. Since the decision of the Hustings Court prisoner's husband has made efforts to get a passport for her, she consenting to return to the North, where her children are at school, but has been refused by the authorities.--To obey the orders of the Court, therefore, she must run the
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