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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 9, 1863., [Electronic resource].

Found 485 total hits in 239 results.

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Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ed States, or any component State thereof, and the Confederate States, or any component State thereof, was, under the Confederate Constitution and the laws of Congress, exclusively committed to the Executive Department of the Confederate Government; and therefore that the woman in question having, by permission of the Confederate authorities, visited the United States and returned to the Confederate States, of which Virginia forms a part, she is amenable to no other authority. The State of Virginia could not, by the most solemn act of Assembly, legally, or in consistence with the Confederate Constitution, authorize any of its citizens — not even the Governor — to visit the United States without the permission of the Confederate Government; nor could it take away any permission so granted, nor inflict penalties for accepting it, for the simple reason that she has expressly and exclusively delegated that sphere of jurisdiction to the Confederate Government, and declared its constit
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
matter; that by the Constitution of the Confederate States the exclusive regulation of the foreign had recognized war as existing between the United States, as a foreign nation, and the Confederate Confederate States which, by the law of nations, placed all the inhabitants of the one country in a state of warregulation of this intercourse between the United States, or any component State thereof, and the CConfederate States, or any component State thereof, was, under the Confederate Constitution and the lf the Confederate authorities, visited the United States and returned to the Confederate States, ofrry on trade or other intercourse with the United States, notwithstanding the pendency of war betwenalties upon its citizens for visiting the United States might prevent the Confederate Government, doubted powers, from sending agents to the United States on missions of public policy and importancnd by the permission and approval of the Confederate States Government, which is the Government of V[2 more...]
October 7th (search for this): article 1
From the southwest. Missionary Ridge, via Chickamauga, October 7. --Slight rain fell here during last night and this forenoon. The enemy threw another pontoon across the river last night, and have been at work on a new one to day. The Tennessee is still rising. The enemy is creating platforms for siege guns on the star fort, and are engaged in strengthening all their other works. We have been shelling them slowly all day.
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 1
From the southwest. Missionary Ridge, via Chickamauga, October 7. --Slight rain fell here during last night and this forenoon. The enemy threw another pontoon across the river last night, and have been at work on a new one to day. The Tennessee is still rising. The enemy is creating platforms for siege guns on the star fort, and are engaged in strengthening all their other works. We have been shelling them slowly all day.
Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
From the southwest. Missionary Ridge, via Chickamauga, October 7. --Slight rain fell here during last night and this forenoon. The enemy threw another pontoon across the river last night, and have been at work on a new one to day. The Tennessee is still rising. The enemy is creating platforms for siege guns on the star fort, and are engaged in strengthening all their other works. We have been shelling them slowly all day.
Our Chief Dangers. --It is a mortifying fact that the principal obstacles which still obstruct the success of our cause are to be found among ourselves, in the insatiate greed of gain which has seized upon all classes and the fault-finding spirit which is so freely indulged towards a Government which has accomplished more with the means at its command than has ever been accomplished in the same time by any other Government under the sun. The enemy, frantic to discover some weak point in our harness, may well interpret the high prices of articles essential to life as evidences of an inability to produce our own supplies, which will prove a most powerful ally of his arms; whereas, in point of fact, the land is teeming with plenty, and the high prices are the results of causes which have nothing to do with the capacity of production. So, too, the grumblings and growling at the Government may be seized upon as evidence of fatal dissensions among ourselves, thereby encouraging the L
service. The above statement does not embrace recruits or conscripts furnished by the State of Virginia, of which we have no returns. S. Cooper. Adjutant and Inspector General. To Col. S. B. French A. D. C., &c. Gen. Dimmock's report. Headq'rs Va. Ord. Dep't, Richmond, Oct. 6, 1863. Wm. H. Richardson, Adj't Gen'l: General — I have the honor to report, in answer to a call from the Legislature, through the Governor of the Commonwealth, as follows: Arms issued Between October 1st, 1859, and October 1st, 1863.--Cannon, pieces, 399; Muskets, 103,840; Rifles, 6,428; Carbines, 795; Musketoons, 446; Pistols, 4,438; Sabres, 7,863. Remaining on Hand in the Virginia Armory on the 1st October, 1863.--Brass 6-pdr cannon (mounted,) 5; brass 12-pdr howitzer, (not mounted,) 1; brass (mounted) mountain howitzer, 3; iron 12-pdr cannon, (mounted,) 8; iron 6-pdr cannon, (mounted,) 26; iron 4-pdr cannon, (mounted,) 13; iron 6-pdr cannon, (without limbers,) 5; iron 4-pdr rifl
S. Cooper (search for this): article 1
f the House of Delegates: In response to the resolution adopted by the House of Delegates, I have the honor to transmit the accompanying reports from Adjutant-General Cooper, of the Confederate Government, and Gen. Dimmock, of the Ordnance Department of Virginia. I have only to add that over 30,000 conscripts have passed through the camp of instruction, in charge of Col. Shields. Respectfully, John Letcher. Gen. Cooper's report. Statement of the number of troops furnished the Confederate States by the State of Virginia, as taken from the first rolls on file in the Adjutant and Inspector General's office: 64regiments of infantrtive in all arms of the service. The above statement does not embrace recruits or conscripts furnished by the State of Virginia, of which we have no returns. S. Cooper. Adjutant and Inspector General. To Col. S. B. French A. D. C., &c. Gen. Dimmock's report. Headq'rs Va. Ord. Dep't, Richmond, Oct. 6, 1863. Wm. H
John Letcher (search for this): article 1
cord of Virginia. Executive Department, Richmond, Va., Oct. 7, 1863. Gentlemen of the House of Delegates: In response to the resolution adopted by the House of Delegates, I have the honor to transmit the accompanying reports from Adjutant-General Cooper, of the Confederate Government, and Gen. Dimmock, of the Ordnance Department of Virginia. I have only to add that over 30,000 conscripts have passed through the camp of instruction, in charge of Col. Shields. Respectfully, John Letcher. Gen. Cooper's report. Statement of the number of troops furnished the Confederate States by the State of Virginia, as taken from the first rolls on file in the Adjutant and Inspector General's office: 64regiments of infantry52,490 20regiments of cavalry14,175 2regiments of artillery1,779 28battalions cavalry, infantry, and artillery11,717 9battalions artillery, Army Northern Virginia4,500 214unattached companies — artillery, infantry, and cavalry18,248 Total num
ying documents: The army Record of Virginia. Executive Department, Richmond, Va., Oct. 7, 1863. Gentlemen of the House of Delegates: In response to the resolution adopted by the House of Delegates, I have the honor to transmit the accompanying reports from Adjutant-General Cooper, of the Confederate Government, and Gen. Dimmock, of the Ordnance Department of Virginia. I have only to add that over 30,000 conscripts have passed through the camp of instruction, in charge of Col. Shields. Respectfully, John Letcher. Gen. Cooper's report. Statement of the number of troops furnished the Confederate States by the State of Virginia, as taken from the first rolls on file in the Adjutant and Inspector General's office: 64regiments of infantry52,490 20regiments of cavalry14,175 2regiments of artillery1,779 28battalions cavalry, infantry, and artillery11,717 9battalions artillery, Army Northern Virginia4,500 214unattached companies — artillery, infantry
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