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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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February 28th, 1847 AD (search for this): chapter 11
acteristic. whom no skill could save, everything continues to thrive with us; the dairy, the piggery, the poultry-yard-and a well-filled poultry-yard, with no market at hand to tempt the cupidity of owners, is no contemptible thing in the opinion of a person in robust health. We have bushels of figs, and wish you were here to enjoy them. We have also a fine patch of sweet-potatoes. A few letters are given from a large correspondence with Mr. Hancock and the writer: China Grove, February 28, 1847. Dear Hancock: You have long since, I fear, condemned me for neglect, and appearances are so much against me that I would not blame you; but I had a reasonable excuse in the unremitted labor I had to encounter in repairing my farm and preparing for a crop. I may say with truth that I have scarcely taken time to rest since we came here. The plantation has quite a renovated appearance, and I hope by next winter to have it in complete reparation, with a comfortable house to live in,
December 11th, 1848 AD (search for this): chapter 11
is to be highly valued, those who fish for it usually catch minnows. Avoid in your speaking what Macaulay calls carmagnoles (puns, jests, rant, interjections), but few conditions of society admit their use. Your own good sense, my dear son, has already suggested to you better counsel than I can give you; but it is the privilege of age to make youth suffer in that way, and you perceive I use my privilege. Your affectionate father, A. Sidney Johnston. Brazoria County, Texas, December 11, 1848. my dear will: Your last letter, giving renewed assurance of the satisfactory progress and improvement in your studies, was received with all the gratification the most solicitous parent must naturally experience for a son whose conduct has always commanded his highest respect as well as unbounded affection. You express the determination to make great efforts, and if necessary great sacrifices, for the attainment of the first honor. While I would inculcate all the diligence com
June 10th, 1849 AD (search for this): chapter 11
nston regretted deeply that distance, poverty, and the requirements of their education, separated his elder children from him. In expressing this feeling to his daughter, in 1848, he says: It is a great disappointment to me; but we have learned to repine at nothing, believing that there is a Power that orders all things for the best-that even those things that are seemingly to our finite mental vision a chastisement are ultimately for some good beyond our ken. In a letter dated June 10, 1849, replying to some good-humored reproaches from Mr. Edward Hobbs for not writing to him, General Johnston says: The life of seclusion and obscurity in which I have lived accounts for your not having heard from me. On my return from Mexico after the campaign of Monterey, I found that all the proceeds of the Louisville property would scarcely suffice for the education of Will and his sister, and that it was necessary to go to work at once with small means for the support of my family
April, 1847 AD (search for this): chapter 11
that galled his neck like an iron yoke. Mrs. Johnston says, in one letter: He is almost in despair, and often says he feels like a drowning man with his hands tied; but he tries to keep up his spirits. And again, writing in October, 1849, she says: Our home is now a beautiful place, and I have become so attached to it that I shall grieve a great deal when we must leave it. Your father looks care-worn and sad. You would be astonished at the great change in him since you last saw him (April, 1847). From a fleshy, stout man he has grown quite thin, and, considering his frame, slender. It would not have been strange if disappointment had tinged with bitterness a nature so aspiring; but, if it was so, it took the form of an almost silent self-reproach, which accepted with stoical firmness both the consequences of his own mistakes and the hard decrees of a seemingly inexorable destiny. It is proof of the strength of his principles and the sweetness of his temper, as well as of th
, which does not meddle much with private pursuits, and taxes with great moderation-always excepting the municipal tyrannies of our land. The patriotism of our people is founded in the advantages derived from their institutions; hence its ardor; hence it is a constant quantity, never short of the exigency. General Johnston regretted deeply that distance, poverty, and the requirements of their education, separated his elder children from him. In expressing this feeling to his daughter, in 1848, he says: It is a great disappointment to me; but we have learned to repine at nothing, believing that there is a Power that orders all things for the best-that even those things that are seemingly to our finite mental vision a chastisement are ultimately for some good beyond our ken. In a letter dated June 10, 1849, replying to some good-humored reproaches from Mr. Edward Hobbs for not writing to him, General Johnston says: The life of seclusion and obscurity in which I have
some of his characteristics, what might otherwise seem an unnecessary self-display will, I hope, be pardoned. Soon after establishing himself on the plantation, my father sent for me to visit him, and I spent about three months from New-Year's (1847) there. It is proper to say that he had always treated me with a confidence and consideration proportioned not at all to my merits, nor probably even to his conception of them, but to the ideal which he set before me as worthy of imitation. His on offered. The letters appended present a fair record of his plantation life and current of thought, and illustrate the facts and characteristics already mentioned. The first extract is from a letter written by General Johnston in the spring of 1847 to the author, who had recently left him: Sid is a fine boy, grows well, and talks a great deal about brother Willie. Like all healthy children, he is considered a prodigy, physically and mentally. His mother will give you the facts sustai
April 22nd, 1849 AD (search for this): chapter 11
place would be most agreeable to you- Governor of Oregon, commissioner to run the Mexican boundary, Treasurer of the United States, charge to Sardinia or Naples, Superintendent of the Mint in California, Surveyor-General of California or Missouri, or paymaster in the army. I will guarantee you will have the offer from General Taylor of whatever he may know it would be agreeable to you to accept. . . . G. Hancock. To General A. S. Johnston. Mr. Hancock further says, in a letter of April 22, 1849: You seem to have misapprehended me in relation to your applying for office. I agree with you fully that a gentleman ought not to ask for one, but in your case this never was asked of you. The President of his own accord expressed the determination to give you one, if you would take it, and your friends only wanted to learn from you what you preferred. However, the thing is now settled. Joe Taylor is now here, and tells me you will shortly be offered the place of paymaster in the
nt of his own accord expressed the determination to give you one, if you would take it, and your friends only wanted to learn from you what you preferred. However, the thing is now settled. Joe Taylor is now here, and tells me you will shortly be offered the place of paymaster in the army. . ... G. Hancock. Mr. A. T. Burnley was in General Taylor's confidence, and had been selected by him as one of the proprietors of the Administration organ. He wrote to General Johnston, on the 21st of May: General Taylor intended to offer you the marshalship of Texas. I told him you would not have it. He said then, if Reynolds resigned, he intended to offer you the collectorship of Galveston. I told him you would not have it. Then, said he, I shall offer him a paymaster's place in the army. Not knowing your views as to that place, I replied, I expected you would take it; because I thought it was a good office, and wanted it offered to you. I have since ascertained that it is worth
ife from his letters. letters giving his views of education. preference for an American training. notions on rhetoric, mathematics-requirements for legal success. lessons of moderation. begins to lose hope and health. his fortitude and magnanimity. General Taylor's nomination and election. movements of General Johnston's friends to advance him. his unexpected conduct. letter on office-seeking. finally appointed a paymaster in the army. General Johnston returned to Galveston in October, and was received with enthusiasm by its citizens, with whom he was always a favorite. A public dinner was tendered him, which his business, however, compelled him to decline. A question of the utmost importance to himself now came before General Johnston for decision. When he had gone to General Taylor's assistance in May, he had promised his wife, who strongly opposed his volunteering, that he would not reenlist at the expiration of his term of service without her consent. He knew tha
eminence as genius and merit may command. We will not bow down their honest pride of manhood by placing them among acknowledged classes, where they are never esteemed first, whatever may be said to the contrary. I have perfect confidence in your judgment with regard to our own institutions, and have already referred William to you for your advice. Truly, your friend, A. Sidney Johnston. It may not be amiss to state here that, when General Johnston was Secretary of War of Texas in 1839, Admiral Baudin, of the French Navy, then visiting Texas on diplomatic business, was pleased to express great esteem for General Johnston, and tendered him an appointment for his son in the Polytechnic School. General Johnston, though much gratified at this mark of respect, felt constrained to decline it. He also dissuaded his son at a later date from taking an appointment at West Point, his own experience pointing to so many evils and discouragements in the career of a professional soldier i
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