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Henry Dunster (search for this): chapter 17
Andrew Boardman, Esquires. This wall was removed some forty years since, and a wooden fence built, which in turn was taken away, and in 1893 the present substantial iron fence erected on Massachusetts Avenue, Garden Street, and the northerly boundary. This God's Acre, as it is often called, contains the dust of many of the most eminent persons in Massachusetts: the early ministers of the town, Shepard, Mitchel, Oakes, Appleton, Hilliard, and others; early presidents of Harvard College, Dunster, Chauncy, Willard; the first settlers and proprietors, Simon Stone, Deacon Gregory Stone, Roger Harlakenden, John Bridge, Stephen Daye, Elijah Corlett; and, later, the Lees, the Danas, Allstons, and Wares. It is much to be regretted that so many graves remain unmarked, and equally so that the names of tenants of many costly tombs are unknown by the very imperfect registration, or want of registration, in the town records. Some tombs of once prominent families, who have become extinct, wer
Roger Harlakenden (search for this): chapter 17
which in turn was taken away, and in 1893 the present substantial iron fence erected on Massachusetts Avenue, Garden Street, and the northerly boundary. This God's Acre, as it is often called, contains the dust of many of the most eminent persons in Massachusetts: the early ministers of the town, Shepard, Mitchel, Oakes, Appleton, Hilliard, and others; early presidents of Harvard College, Dunster, Chauncy, Willard; the first settlers and proprietors, Simon Stone, Deacon Gregory Stone, Roger Harlakenden, John Bridge, Stephen Daye, Elijah Corlett; and, later, the Lees, the Danas, Allstons, and Wares. It is much to be regretted that so many graves remain unmarked, and equally so that the names of tenants of many costly tombs are unknown by the very imperfect registration, or want of registration, in the town records. Some tombs of once prominent families, who have become extinct, were built on a level with the sod, and as no name or mark whatever is to be seen, are walked over unknown
Urian Oakes (search for this): chapter 17
m of £ 25 to the Committee of the Town, Samuel Danforth, William Brattle, and Andrew Boardman, Esquires. This wall was removed some forty years since, and a wooden fence built, which in turn was taken away, and in 1893 the present substantial iron fence erected on Massachusetts Avenue, Garden Street, and the northerly boundary. This God's Acre, as it is often called, contains the dust of many of the most eminent persons in Massachusetts: the early ministers of the town, Shepard, Mitchel, Oakes, Appleton, Hilliard, and others; early presidents of Harvard College, Dunster, Chauncy, Willard; the first settlers and proprietors, Simon Stone, Deacon Gregory Stone, Roger Harlakenden, John Bridge, Stephen Daye, Elijah Corlett; and, later, the Lees, the Danas, Allstons, and Wares. It is much to be regretted that so many graves remain unmarked, and equally so that the names of tenants of many costly tombs are unknown by the very imperfect registration, or want of registration, in the town
Joseph Story (search for this): chapter 17
ounded by its woody, irregular shores and grand avenues for pleasure-driving. The first committee for the cemetery was composed of influential men, the late Judge Story being chairman. It met August 3, 1831, and received a very encouraging report. August 8th, another committee was selected to procure a survey, and a plan for laying out lots. This survey was by Alexander Wadsworth, civil engineer. The consecration of the cemetery occurred on Saturday, September 24, 1831, the late Judge Story delivering the address, in Consecration Dell, as it has since been called. An audience of two thousand persons, seated in a temporary amphitheatre among the trated ground, not far distant from the gateway, stands a chapel made of granite, of Gothic design. Within are marble statues, in a sitting position, of the late Judge Story, and of John Winthrop, the first governor of Massachusetts. Two others standing, of John Adams, the second president of the United States, and James Otis, the p
John A. Albro (search for this): chapter 17
nearly a half century, mostly by the inhabitants of those sections of the town, until the year 1854, when the present cemetery on Coolidge Avenue was laid out under the direction of a committee appointed by the city government. The services of consecration were held on the premises November 1, 1854, and this beautiful spot was sacredly set apart for its new purpose. Remarks on the occasion were made by Hon. Abraham Edwards, then mayor, and the consecration address was given by Rev. John A. Albro, D. D., who aptly said in reference to the place: Its locality,—its natural features,—its seclusion from the great thoroughfares of life, make it a spot preeminently adapted to the end for which it has been chosen. Within these grounds, and not far from where we are now standing, the first Christian proprietor of this soil, Simon Stone, a companion in faith and tribulation of our Shepard, and one of the noble band of Puritans, who first established the Church of God in this Town, built
James Otis (search for this): chapter 17
st recorded burial is that of a child of James Boyd, of Roxbury, July 6, 1832, on Mountain Avenue; the second, that of Mrs. Hastings, July 12, 1832, on the same avenue. On elevated ground, not far distant from the gateway, stands a chapel made of granite, of Gothic design. Within are marble statues, in a sitting position, of the late Judge Story, and of John Winthrop, the first governor of Massachusetts. Two others standing, of John Adams, the second president of the United States, and James Otis, the patriot. The Sphinx, the Egyptian symbol of might and intelligence, was erected in 1872, and fronts the chapel. It is a massive monument, recalling our civil war by its inscription,— American Union preserved American Slavery destroyed by the uprising of a great people by the blood of fallen heroes The gateway to the cemetery is built of Quincy granite, the design being taken from the entrance to an Egyptian temple. It bears the following in bold raised letters:— Then shal
Phillips Brooks (search for this): chapter 17
2. On Central Avenue, near the gateway, is the bronze statue, sitting, of Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch. On High Cedar Hill stands a beautiful marble temple; beneath which rest the remains of Hon. Samuel Appleton. Others eminent in public life rest here in this sacred soil:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phillips Brooks. President Josiah Quincy.James Russell Lowell. John G. Palfrey.Rev. A. Holmes, D. D. President Sparks.Oliver Wendell Holmes. Robert C. Winthrop. On Gentian Path is a beautiful granite obelisk, erected by Thomas Dowse, on which is inscribed— To the memory of Benjamin Franklin, the printer, the philosopher, the statesman, the patriot, who by his wisdom blessed his country, and his age, and bequeathed to the world an illustrious example of industry, integrity, and self-culture.
ranite, the design being taken from the entrance to an Egyptian temple. It bears the following in bold raised letters:— Then shall the Dust return to the Earth as it was; and the Spirit shall return unto God who gave it. Near this, at the entrance of a high natural ridge, with a level surface, running through the grounds, called Indian Ridge, is the sarcophagus of Gaspar Spurzheim, the celebrated phrenologist; he died in 1832. Farther on is that of the poet Longfellow, who died in 1882. On Central Avenue, near the gateway, is the bronze statue, sitting, of Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch. On High Cedar Hill stands a beautiful marble temple; beneath which rest the remains of Hon. Samuel Appleton. Others eminent in public life rest here in this sacred soil:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phi
February 3rd, 1632 AD (search for this): chapter 17
ntury left above, Go,—read it in an hour! O. W. Holmes. As early as 1634-35, one John Pratt was granted two acres of land, described as situated By the old Burying Place without the common pales. This deed indicates the first land used for burials, which was located, as nearly as can be ascertained, on the northerly corner of the present Ash and Brattle streets, outside of the stockade which was erected in 1632. Rev. Abiel Holmes, D. D., wrote in the year 1800, that £ 60 was levied 3d February, 1632, towards making a Palisado about the New Towne. This was actually made, and the fosse which was then dug is in some places visible to this day. It enclosed above one thousand acres. This in a measure protected the little town from Indians and wild beasts. This burial-place was discontinued when the present ancient ground on the corner of Massachusetts Avenue and Garden Street was set apart for burials, and ordered paled in, early in 1635-36. One hundred years later, 1735, the town
ot contend for error instead of truth, they chose this Place, being then under the orthodox and soul-flourishing Ministry of Mr. Thomas Shepheard. In 1885 the City Council placed this ancient burial-ground in charge of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners. By their direction it was thoroughly renovated, ornamental trees and shrubs were planted, the gravestones were righted and otherwise put in a condition suitably becoming the resting-place of so many of our honored dead. About the year 1811, with the continued growth of East Cambridge and Cambridgeport, the old ground had become crowded, and more than once entirely filled; then an urgent call was made for another burial-place. Two and one fourth acres of ground were purchased on Broadway, at the corner of Norfolk Street. This was used nearly a half century, mostly by the inhabitants of those sections of the town, until the year 1854, when the present cemetery on Coolidge Avenue was laid out under the direction of a committee ap
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