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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography (ed. H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A.).

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C. or Callipolis, or Selinus, or Eubœa, or many other places; of these the Zanclæi of MylœMilazzo. founded Himera,About 649 B. C. the people of Naxos, Callipolis,It is supposed that Callipolis anciently occupied the site of Mascalis. the Megaræans of Sicily,Those who inhabited Hybia Minor. We know that Selinus was in existence 640 B. C., and destroyed 268 B. C. Selinus,Now ruins called di Pollece on the river Madiuni in the Terra de' Pulci. and the LeontiniThe Leontini arrived in Sicily 728 B. C., and founded Leontini, now Lentini. Eubœa.Eubmœa was destroyed by the tyrant Gelon, who reigned from 491 to 478 B. C. Eubali, Castellazzio, and a place near the little town of Licodia, not far from the source of the Drillo, have been supposed to be the site of the ancient Eubœa. Siebenkees thinks that the words between daggers at the end of § 7 should follow Eubœa. Many too of the cities of the aboriginal inhabitantsLit. barbarians. have been destroyed, as Camici, the king
especially in Lipari itself.—These islands are seven in number, the chief of which is Lipari, a colony of the Cnidians.Founded about B. C. 580. It is nearest to Sicily after Thermessa.Thermessa, at present called Vulcano, is doubtless the same mentioned in Pliny's Nat. Hist. lib. iii. § 14, tom. i. p. 164, as Therasia, by the error of the copyist. Paulus Orosius, lib. iv. cap. 20, says that it rose from the bed of the sea, B. C. 571. It is however certain that it was in existence B. C. 427, confer. l'hucyd. lib. iii. § 88, and was for a considerable time called Hiera. It was originally named Meligunis. It was possessed of a fleet, and for a considerable time repelled the incursions of the Tyrrheni.See Pausan. Phoc. or lib. x. cap. 16, p. 835. The islands now called Liparæan were subject to it, some call them the islands of Æolus. The citizens were so successful as to make frequent offerings of the spoils taken in war to the temple of Apollo at Delphi.See Pausan. Phoc. or <
. It seems probable that MorgantiumIt is probable that Morgantium was situated on the right bank of the Giaretta, below its confluence with the Dattaino, but at some little distance from the sea; at least such is the opinion of Cluverius, in opposition to the views of Sicilian topographers. Sic. Ant. book ii. cap. 7, pp. 325 and 335. was founded by the Morgetes. Formerly it was a city, but now it is not. When the CarthaginiansThe first settlement of the Carthaginians in Sicily was about 560 B. C. endeavoured to gain possession of the island they continually harassed both the Greeks and the barbarians, but the Syracusans withstood them; at a later period the Romans expelled the Carthaginians and took Syracuse after a long siege.212 years B. C. And [Sextus] Pompeius, having destroyed Syracuse in the same way as he had done by the other cities,42 years B. C. Augustus Cæsar in our own times sent thither a colony, and to a great extent restored it to its former importance, for
erence to the Timao,The ancient Timavus. See book v. chap. i. § 8, page 319. it has already been particularized. Phenomena, similar to these, and such as take place throughout Sicily,The French translation, en divers endroits de I' Italic. Some manuscripts read )Itali/an. We have followed Kramer and Groskurd. are witnessed in the Lipari Islands, and especially in Lipari itself.—These islands are seven in number, the chief of which is Lipari, a colony of the Cnidians.Founded about B. C. 580. It is nearest to Sicily after Thermessa.Thermessa, at present called Vulcano, is doubtless the same mentioned in Pliny's Nat. Hist. lib. iii. § 14, tom. i. p. 164, as Therasia, by the error of the copyist. Paulus Orosius, lib. iv. cap. 20, says that it rose from the bed of the sea, B. C. 571. It is however certain that it was in existence B. C. 427, confer. l'hucyd. lib. iii. § 88, and was for a considerable time called Hiera. It was originally named Meligunis. It was possessed of a fle
it about 409 years B. C. or Gela,Some colonists from Rhodes made a settlement here 45 years after the foundation of Syracuse. It was overthrown about 279 years B. C. or Callipolis, or Selinus, or Eubœa, or many other places; of these the Zanclæi of MylœMilazzo. founded Himera,About 649 B. C. the people of Naxos, Callipolis,It is supposed that Callipolis anciently occupied the site of Mascalis. the Megaræans of Sicily,Those who inhabited Hybia Minor. We know that Selinus was in existence 640 B. C., and destroyed 268 B. C. Selinus,Now ruins called di Pollece on the river Madiuni in the Terra de' Pulci. and the LeontiniThe Leontini arrived in Sicily 728 B. C., and founded Leontini, now Lentini. Eubœa.Eubmœa was destroyed by the tyrant Gelon, who reigned from 491 to 478 B. C. Eubali, Castellazzio, and a place near the little town of Licodia, not far from the source of the Drillo, have been supposed to be the site of the ancient Eubœa. Siebenkees thinks that the words between d
s to RhegiumReggio. is 60 stadia, but the distance to the Columna Rheginorum is much less. It was from a colony of the Messenians of the Peloponnesus that it was named Messana, having been originally called Zanole, on account of the great inequality of the coast (for anything irregular was termed ca/gklion.Thucydides says ca/gklion is a Sicilian word. It was originally founded by the people of Naxos near Catana. Afterwards the Mamertini, a tribe of Campanians, took possession of it.B. C. 289. The Romans, in the war in Sicily against the Carthaginians, used it as an arsenal.B. C. 264 to 243. Still more recently,B. C. 44. Sextus Pompeius assembled his fleet in it, to contend against Augustus Cæsar; and when he relinquished the island, he took ship from thence.B. C. 36. CharybdisNow called Garafalo. is pointed out at a short distance from the city in the Strait, an immense gulf, into which the back currents of the Strait frequently impel ships, carrying them down with a whirl an
t was from a colony of the Messenians of the Peloponnesus that it was named Messana, having been originally called Zanole, on account of the great inequality of the coast (for anything irregular was termed ca/gklion.Thucydides says ca/gklion is a Sicilian word. It was originally founded by the people of Naxos near Catana. Afterwards the Mamertini, a tribe of Campanians, took possession of it.B. C. 289. The Romans, in the war in Sicily against the Carthaginians, used it as an arsenal.B. C. 264 to 243. Still more recently,B. C. 44. Sextus Pompeius assembled his fleet in it, to contend against Augustus Cæsar; and when he relinquished the island, he took ship from thence.B. C. 36. CharybdisNow called Garafalo. is pointed out at a short distance from the city in the Strait, an immense gulf, into which the back currents of the Strait frequently impel ships, carrying them down with a whirl and the violence of the eddy. When they are swallowed down and shattered, the wrecks are cast
of the Peloponnesus that it was named Messana, having been originally called Zanole, on account of the great inequality of the coast (for anything irregular was termed ca/gklion.Thucydides says ca/gklion is a Sicilian word. It was originally founded by the people of Naxos near Catana. Afterwards the Mamertini, a tribe of Campanians, took possession of it.B. C. 289. The Romans, in the war in Sicily against the Carthaginians, used it as an arsenal.B. C. 264 to 243. Still more recently,B. C. 44. Sextus Pompeius assembled his fleet in it, to contend against Augustus Cæsar; and when he relinquished the island, he took ship from thence.B. C. 36. CharybdisNow called Garafalo. is pointed out at a short distance from the city in the Strait, an immense gulf, into which the back currents of the Strait frequently impel ships, carrying them down with a whirl and the violence of the eddy. When they are swallowed down and shattered, the wrecks are cast by the stream on the shore of Tauromen
ica, looking towards that region and the setting of the sun in winter.The south-west. Of the sides which these three headlands bound, two are somewhat concave, while the third is slightly convex, it runs from Lilybæum to Pelorias, and is the longest, being, as Posidonius has said, 1700 stadia adding further twenty. Of the others, that extending to Pachynus from Lilybæum is the longer, while the shortest faces the Strait and Italy, extending from Pelorias to Pachynus, being about 1120 or 1130 stadia. Posidonius shows that the circumference is 4400 stadia, but in the Chorography the distances are declared to exceed the above numbers, being severally reckoned in miles. Thus from Cape Pelorias to Mylæ,Milazzo. 25 miles; from Mylæ to Tyndaris,S. Maria di Tindaro. 25; thence to Agathyrnum,The MSS. of Strabo read Agathyrsum, but the town is more commonly called Agathyrnum. Livy, book xxvi. cap. 40, and Silius Italicus, book xiv. ver. 260, call it Agathyrna. Cluverius conside
ng, as Posidonius has said, 1700 stadia adding further twenty. Of the others, that extending to Pachynus from Lilybæum is the longer, while the shortest faces the Strait and Italy, extending from Pelorias to Pachynus, being about 1120 or 1130 stadia. Posidonius shows that the circumference is 4400 stadia, but in the Chorography the distances are declared to exceed the above numbers, being severally reckoned in miles. Thus from Cape Pelorias to Mylæ,Milazzo. 25 miles; from Mylæ to Tyn the transit from Pachynus to the mouth of the AlpheusA river of the Peloponnesus, now called Ruféa. is 4000 stadia. But when Artemidorus says that from Pachy- nus to TænarumCape Matapan. it is 4600, and from the Alpheus to the Pamisus is 1130 stadia,The French translation gives 1160 stadia. he appears to me to lie open to the objection of having given distances which do not accord with the 4000 stadia from Pachynus to the Alpheus. The line run from Pachynus to Lilybæum (which is muc<
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