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Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
As stated before, after the fall of Vicksburg I urged strongly upon the government the propriety of a movement against Mobile. General Rosecrans had been at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, with a large and well-equipped army from early in the year 1863,t from Bragg were free to return. It was at this time that I recommended to the general-in-chief the movement against Mobile. I knew the peril the Army of the Cumberland was in, being depleted continually, not only by ordinary casualties, but alts constantly extending line over which to draw supplies, while the enemy in front was as constantly being strengthened. Mobile was important to the enemy, and in the absence of a threatening force was guarded by little else than artillery. If thretance. The emergency was now too immediate to allow us to give this assistance by making an attack in rear of Bragg upon Mobile. It was therefore necessary to reinforce directly, and troops were sent from every available point. Rosecrans had ve
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ng an attack in rear of Bragg upon Mobile. It was therefore necessary to reinforce directly, and troops were sent from every available point. Rosecrans had very skilfully manoeuvred Bragg south of the Tennessee River, and through and beyond Chattanooga. If he had stopped and intrenched, and made himself strong there, all would have been right and the mistake of not moving earlier partially compensated. But he pushed on, with his forces very much scattered, until Bragg's troops from Mississippi began to join him. Then Bragg took the initiative. Rosecrans had to fall back in turn, and was able to get his army together at Chickamauga, some miles south-east of Chattanooga, before the main battle was brought on. The battle was fought on the 19th and 20th of September, and Rosecrans was badly defeated, with a heavy loss in artillery and some sixteen thousand men killed, wounded and captured. The corps under Major-General George H. Thomas stood its ground, while Rosecrans, with
Indianapolis (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
e I would meet an officer of the War Department with my instructions. I left Cairo within an hour or two after the receipt of this dispatch, going by rail via Indianapolis. Just as the train I was on was starting out of the depot at Indianapolis a messenger came running up to stop it, saying the Secretary of War was coming into Indianapolis a messenger came running up to stop it, saying the Secretary of War was coming into the station and wanted to see me. I had never met Mr. [Edwin M.] Stanton up to that time, though we had held frequent conversations over the wires the year before, when I was in Tennessee. Occasionally at night he would order the wires between the War Department and my headquarters to be connected, and we would hold a conversohn] Brough of Ohio, whom I had never met, though he and my father had been old acquaintances. Mr. Stanton dismissed the special train that had brought him to Indianapolis, and accompanied me to Louisville. Up to this time no hint had been given me of what was wanted after I left Vicksburg, except the suggestion in one of Hal
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
rently heard enough. At all events they commenced a general hand-shaking, which, although trying where there is so much of it, was a great relief to me in this emergency. From Nashville I telegraphed to Burnside, who was then at Knoxville, that important points in his department ought to be fortified, so that they could be held with the least number of men; to Admiral Porter at Cairo, that Sherman's advance had passed Eastport, Mississippi, that rations were probably on their way from St. Louis by boat for supplying his army, and requesting him to send a gunboat to convoy them; and to Thomas, suggesting that large parties should be put at work on the wagon-road then in use back to Bridgeport. On the morning of the 21st we took the train for the front, reaching Stevenson, Alabama, after dark. Rosecrans was there on his way north. He came into my car and we held a brief interview, in which he described very clearly the situation at Chattanooga, and made some excellent suggest
Stevenson (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
t to be fortified, so that they could be held with the least number of men; to Admiral Porter at Cairo, that Sherman's advance had passed Eastport, Mississippi, that rations were probably on their way from St. Louis by boat for supplying his army, and requesting him to send a gunboat to convoy them; and to Thomas, suggesting that large parties should be put at work on the wagon-road then in use back to Bridgeport. On the morning of the 21st we took the train for the front, reaching Stevenson, Alabama, after dark. Rosecrans was there on his way north. He came into my car and we held a brief interview, in which he described very clearly the situation at Chattanooga, and made some excellent suggestions as to what should be done. My only wonder was that he had not carried them out. We then proceeded to Bridgeport, where we stopped for the night. From here we took horses and made our way by Jasper and over Waldron's Ridge to Chattanooga. There had been much rain, and the roads were
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
issippi-Andrew Johnson's Address-arrival at Chattanooga The reply (to my telegram of October 16,ved a dispatch from Mr. C. A. Dana, then in Chattanooga, informing him that unless prevented Rosecr the latter's troops where they were or lay Chattanooga open to capture. General Halleck strongly the Tennessee River, and through and beyond Chattanooga. If he had stopped and intrenched, and mader at Chickamauga, some miles south-east of Chattanooga, before the main battle was brought on. Thepossession of Missionary Ridge, overlooking Chattanooga. He also occupied Lookout Mountain, west oh south and north of the Tennessee, between Chattanooga and Bridgeport. The distance between these he described very clearly the situation at Chattanooga, and made some excellent suggestions as to r way by Jasper and over Waldron's Ridge to Chattanooga. There had been much rain, and the roads wer on. The next day [October 23] we reached Chattanooga a little before dark. I went directly to G[5 more...]
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
point) came on the morning of the 17th, directing me to proceed immediately to the Gait House, Louisville, where I would meet an officer of the War Department with my instructions. I left Cairo withitanton dismissed the special train that had brought him to Indianapolis, and accompanied me to Louisville. Up to this time no hint had been given me of what was wanted after I left Vicksburg, exceother relieved Rosecrans and assigned Thomas to his place. I accepted the latter. We reached Louisville after night and, if I remember rightly, in a cold, drizzling rain. The Secretary of War told n that occasion from which he never expected to recover. He never did. A day was spent in Louisville, the Secretary giving me the military news at the capital and talking about the disappointmentpend the evening away, both Mrs. Grant (who was with me) and myself having relatives living in Louisville. In the course of the evening Mr. Stanton received a dispatch from Mr. C. A. Dana, then in Ch
Chickamauga (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
. Rosecrans had very skilfully manoeuvred Bragg south of the Tennessee River, and through and beyond Chattanooga. If he had stopped and intrenched, and made himself strong there, all would have been right and the mistake of not moving earlier partially compensated. But he pushed on, with his forces very much scattered, until Bragg's troops from Mississippi began to join him. Then Bragg took the initiative. Rosecrans had to fall back in turn, and was able to get his army together at Chickamauga, some miles south-east of Chattanooga, before the main battle was brought on. The battle was fought on the 19th and 20th of September, and Rosecrans was badly defeated, with a heavy loss in artillery and some sixteen thousand men killed, wounded and captured. The corps under Major-General George H. Thomas stood its ground, while Rosecrans, with Crittenden and McCook, returned to Chattanooga. Thomas returned also, but later, and with his troops in good order. Bragg followed and too
Raccoon Mountains (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
nt strategic position to us, but it would have been attended with the loss of all the artillery still left with the Army of the Cumberland and the annihilation of that army itself, either by capture or demoralization. All supplies for Rosecrans had to be brought from Nashville. The railroad between this base and the army was in possession of the government up to Bridgeport, the point at which the road crosses to the south side of the Tennessee River; but Bragg, holding Lookout and Raccoon mountains west of Chattanooga, commanded the railroad, the river and the shortest and best wagon-roads, both south and north of the Tennessee, between Chattanooga and Bridgeport. The distance between these two places is but twenty-six miles by rail; but owing to the position of Bragg, all supplies for Rosecrans had to be hauled by a circuitous route north of the river and over a mountainous country, increasing the distance to over sixty miles. This country afforded but little food for his a
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 40
they were, while the other relieved Rosecrans and assigned Thomas to his place. I accepted the latter. We reached Louisvilnd captured. The corps under Major-General George H. Thomas stood its ground, while Rosecrans, with Crittenden and McCook, returned to Chattanooga. Thomas returned also, but later, and with his troops in good order. Bragg followed and took hen telegraphed to him the order from Washington assigning Thomas to the command of the Army of the Cumberland; and to ThomaThomas that he must hold Chattanooga at all hazards, informing him at the same time that I would be at the front as soon as possible. A prompt reply was received from Thomas, saying, We will hold the town till we starve. I appreciated the force of thind requesting him to send a gunboat to convoy them; and to Thomas, suggesting that large parties should be put at work on th Chattanooga a little before dark. I went directly to General Thomas's headquarters, and remaining there a few days, until
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