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Namozine Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
e to a comfortable-looking brick house, with a yard in front, situated on one of the principal streets, and here he and the officers accompanying him dismounted and took seats on the piazza. A number of the citizens soon gathered on the sidewalk and gazed with eager curiosity upon the commander of the Yankee armies. Soon an officer came with a dispatch from Sheridan, who had been reenforced and ordered to strike out along the Danville railroad, saying he was already nine miles beyond Namozine Creek and pressing the enemy's trains. The general was anxious to move westward at once with the leading infantry columns, but Mr. Lincoln had telegraphed that he was on his way, and the general, though he had replied that he could not wait for his arrival, decided to prolong his stay until the President came up. Mr. Lincoln, accompanied by his little son Tad, dismounted in the street and came in through the front gate with long and rapid strides, his face beaming with delight. He seized Gen
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
o, broke it open, and pulled out a little ball of tin-foil. Rolled up in this was a sheet of tissue paper on which was written the famous dispatch so widely published at the time, in which Sheridan Captain John R. Tucker, C. S. N. From a photograph. described the situation at Jetersville, and added: I wish you were here yourself. The general said he would go at once to Sheridan, and dismounted from his black pony Jeff Davis, which he had been riding, and called for his big bay horse Cincinnati. He stood in the road and wrote a dispatch. using the pony's back for a desk, and then, mounting the fresh horse, told Campbell to lead the way. It was found we would have to skirt the enemy's lines, and it was thought prudent to take some cavalry with us, but there was none near at hand, and the general said he would risk it with our mounted escort of fourteen men. Calling upon me and two or three other officers to accompany him, he started off. It was now after dark, but there was enou
Dinwiddie Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
rdered to move out in the direction of Dinwiddie Court House, and to be ready to strike the enemy'she Boydton plank-road, and Sheridan at Dinwiddie Court House. The weather had become cloudy, and turoy every mile of them from the railroad to Dinwiddie. I tell you I'm ready to strike out tomorroo the Five Forks road, which runs north from Dinwiddie, I saw a portion of our cavalry moving eastwere soon after compelled to fall back toward Dinwiddie. I turned the corner of the Brooks cross-ro I found Sheridan a little north of Dinwiddie Court House, and gave him an account of matters onhis command on the high ground just north of Dinwiddie, and would hold that position at all hazardsridan's staff, brought still later news from Dinwiddie, saying that the cavalry had had more fighti division of cavalry was ordered to march to Dinwiddie and report to Sheridan. All haste was urgedw: Our position in the vicinity of Dinwiddie Court House [March 31st] brought us to the rear of[1 more...]
Amelia Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
dispatch came from Sheridan, saying he had captured six guns and some wagons, and had intercepted Lee's advance toward Burkeville, that Lee was in person at Amelia Court House, etc. This news was given to the passing troops, and lusty cheers went up from every throat. They had marched about fifteen miles already that day, and nowthat direction. The next day, the 6th, proved a decided field-day in the pursuit. It was found in the morning that Lee had retreated during the night from Amelia Court House, and from the direction he had taken, and the information received that he had ordered rations to meet him at Farmville, it was seen that he had abandoned al, a corps commander in General Lee's army, was killed at Petersburg, April 2d, 1865, and this, or some other important reason, caused General Lee, while at Amelia Court House, to consolidate his army into two corps or wings, one commanded by Lieutenant-General Longstreet and the other by Lieutenant-General Ewell. The main body
Paineville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
heard it read. The general, who never manifested the slightest sign of emotion either in victories or defeats, merely said: I am sorry I did not get this before we left the President. However, I suppose he has heard the news by this time, and then added: Let the news be circulated among the troops as rapidly as possible. Grant and Meade both went into camp at Sutherland's Station that evening, the 3d. The Army of Capture of guns and the destruction of a Confederate wagon-train at Paineville, April 5, by Davies's cavalry Brigade of Crook's division. From a sketch made at the time. The wagon-train was escorted by Gary's cavalry with five guns. General Humphreys, in The Virginia campaign, says it is believed that the papers of General. Robert E. Lee's headquarters, containing many valuable reports, copies of but few of which are now to be found, were destroyed by the burning of these wagons. the Potomac caught a few hours' sleep, and at 3 o'clock the next morning was agai
Rienzi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
pe toward the woods with a steady swing that boded no good for Pickett's command, earth-works or no earth-works. Sheridan was mounted on his favorite black horse Rienzi that had carried him from Winchester to Cedar Creek, and which Buchanan Read made famous for all time by his poem of Sheridan's ride. The roads were muddy, the fields swampy, the undergrowth dense, and Rienzi, as he plunged and curveted, dashed the foam from his mouth and the mud from his heels. Had the Winchester pike been in a similar condition, he would not have made his famous twenty miles without breaking his own neck and Sheridan's too. Mackenzie had been ordered up the Crump roer the earth-works, sweeping everything before them, and killing or capturing every man in their immediate front whose legs had not saved him. Sheridan spurred Rienzi up to the angle, and with a bound the horse carried his rider over the earth-works, and landed in the midst of a line of prisoners who had thrown down their arms
White Oak (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
t. Warren advanced his corps to ascertain with what force the enemy held the White Oak road and to try to drive him from it; but before he had gone far he met with Brooks road, and Griffin and Crawford by the Crump road, which runs from the White Oak road south to J. Boisseau's. [See map, p. 539.] Mackenzie's small division of with his other two divisions, did not get started from their position on the White Oak road till 5 A. M., and the hope of crushing the enemy was hourly growing lessetiring to his intrenched position at Five Forks, which was just north of the White Oak road, and parallel to it, his earth-works running from a point about three-qu field, which sloped down gradually toward the dense woods, just north of the White Oak road. He soon met with a fire from the edge of this woods, a number of men fkenzie had been ordered up the Crump road with directions to turn east on the White Oak road and whip everything he met on that route. He met only a small cavalry c
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
; pick up your gun, man, and move right on to the front. Such was the electric effect of his words that the poor fellow snatched up his musket and rushed forward a dozen paces before he fell never to rise again. The line of battle of weather-beaten veterans was now moving right along down the slope toward the woods with a steady swing that boded no good for Pickett's command, earth-works or no earth-works. Sheridan was mounted on his favorite black horse Rienzi that had carried him from Winchester to Cedar Creek, and which Buchanan Read made famous for all time by his poem of Sheridan's ride. The roads were muddy, the fields swampy, the undergrowth dense, and Rienzi, as he plunged and curveted, dashed the foam from his mouth and the mud from his heels. Had the Winchester pike been in a similar condition, he would not have made his famous twenty miles without breaking his own neck and Sheridan's too. Mackenzie had been ordered up the Crump road with directions to turn east on th
Fort Sedgwick (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
the arrival of the last courier I had dispatched. General Grant was sitting with most of the staff about him before a blazing camp-fire. He Outer works of Fort Sedgwick. Fort Sedgwick, known as Fort hell, opposite the Confederate Fort Mahone. From Photographs. Bomb-Proofs inside Fort Sedgwick. wore his blue cavalry oveFort Sedgwick, known as Fort hell, opposite the Confederate Fort Mahone. From Photographs. Bomb-Proofs inside Fort Sedgwick. wore his blue cavalry overcoat, and the ever-present cigar was in his mouth. I began shouting the good news as soon as I got in sight, and in a moment all but the imperturbable general-in-chief were on their feet giving vent to wild demonstrations of joy. For some minutes there was a bewildering state of excitement, grasping of hands, tossing up of hats, Fort Sedgwick. wore his blue cavalry overcoat, and the ever-present cigar was in his mouth. I began shouting the good news as soon as I got in sight, and in a moment all but the imperturbable general-in-chief were on their feet giving vent to wild demonstrations of joy. For some minutes there was a bewildering state of excitement, grasping of hands, tossing up of hats, and slapping of each other on the back. It meant the beginning of the end — the reaching of the last ditch. It pointed to peace and home. Dignity was thrown to the winds. The general, as was expected, asked his usual question: How many prisoners have been taken? This was always his first inquiry when an engagement was reported
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16.107
intention, as soon as he could take up a good position for this purpose, to reenforee him with a corps of infantry, and cut off Lee's retreat in the direction of Danville, in case we should break through his intrenched lines in front of Petersburg, and force him from his position there. The weather had been fair for several dayundering along with his cavalry, followed by Griffin and the rest of the Army of the Potomac, while Ord was swinging along toward Burkeville to head off Lee from Danville, to which point it was naturally supposed he was pushing in order to unite with Joe Johnston's army. The 4th was another active day; the troops found that this d rested the divisions of his army, ready for an attack if made, and with the hope that under cover of night the whole Confederate army might escape in safety to Danville. The pursuing troops were halted on tile face of the hills skirting the valley, within the range of the enemy's guns, and lines were adjusted for an assault.
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