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G. B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 47
Doc. 45.-occupation of Bowling Green, Ky. Gen. Buell's despatch. Louisville, February 15, 1862. To Major General-McClellan: Mitchell's division, by a forced march, reached the river at Bowling Green to-day, making a bridge to cross. The enemy burned the bridge at one o'clock in the morning, and were evacuating the place when he arrived. D. C. Buell, Brigadier-General Commanding. Gen. Buell's General order. The following is a general order, issued by Gen. Buell to the troops of General Mitchell's division, after their advance upon Bowling Green: General order no. 70. headquarters Third division, Camp John Q. Adams, Bowling Green, February 19, 1862. soldiers of the Third division: You have executed a march of forty miles in twenty-eight hours and a half. The fallen timber and other obstructions, opposed by the enemy to your movements, have been swept from your path. The fire of your artillery, and the bursting of your shells, announced your arrival. S
e approbation of our commanding officer, and of our Government and our country. I trust you feel precisely as does your Commanding General, that nothing is done, while anything remains to be done. By order of Brig.-Gen. O. M. Mitchell, Commanding. Cincinnati Gazette narrative. Bowling Green, Ky., February 15. Our victory is completed! We are now in possession of Bowling Green. Last night, at about nine o'clock, Col. Turchin's brigade, consisting of the Eighteenth Ohio, Col. Stanley, the Thirty-seventh Indiana, Major Hall Commanding, the Twenty fourth Illinois, Col. Mihialotzs, the Nineteenth Illinois, Col. Turchin, together with sections of Loomis's, Edgarton's and Simonson's batteries, and three companies of Col. Kennett's cavalry, were formed in order, and marched rapidly to a ferry, a mile and a half below the town. A single boat was there, a kind of flat-boat, upon which about fifty infantry or a score of cavalry could pass at once. The river is about a hundre
W. C. Hecker (search for this): chapter 47
colding — for we were very tired and foot-sore — the brigade was in ranks. We expected to march to town, but were put on the back track some three miles. We left the main road, and soon came to the river, where we built fires and rested as well as possible. Here the repairs of an old wherry were completed, and we crossed the river, protected by artillery. There was a slight snow falling, and very uncomfortably cold it was. We had a tedious time crossing. The Nineteenth and Twenty-fourth, Hecker's Illinois, crossed first. We pushed on slowly to within a mile or two of the town, where we halted, waiting for the rest. But the boys, getting almost frozen, declared that they had rather be shot than frozen, and we then pushed on, seeing no enemy, but rather fearing a ruse, and that they would return upon us in large force. But no enemy appeared, and we were soon surrounding the fires, some of which had been burning for several days. All the public buildings, and several warehouses fi
John F. Dumont (search for this): chapter 47
remainder of the division should cross, could not be finished in time, and orders were issued for all the other regiments to cross at the same place with Col. Turchin's brigade. Owing to the failure of this order to reach the headquarters of Gen. Dumont, under whose command the rest of the. division had been placed, the troops did not commence marching to the ferry until six o'clock this morning. In the mean time, however, it had been ascertained that the enemy had entirely abandoned the town, and when Gen. Dumont's troops reached the ferry, it was thought unnecessary to have them cross over until the pontoon bridge should be completed. When our forces reached the town, it presented a scene of desolation seldom witnessed. Almost all the inhabitants had gone away — the secessionists from the fear of the Union army, the Union people because they were frightened by Captain Loomis's shells. Those who remained, whether rebel or loyal, did the best, for neither class were molested,
Warner Underwood (search for this): chapter 47
eks ago, by the withdrawal of artillery from some of the outworks. Of course, all the buildings which contained these stores were also burned, together with a mill or two, and a few private residences — amongst which was the mansion of Hon. Warner Underwood, former member of Congress from the Bowling Green district, and brother of Judge Underwood, ex-United States Senator. The house of the Judge is upon the northern side of the river, and would, doubtless, have shared the same fate had not Judge Underwood, ex-United States Senator. The house of the Judge is upon the northern side of the river, and would, doubtless, have shared the same fate had not the vandals been suddenly and unexpectedly driven from their prey. It is hardly necessary to say that both the Judge and his brother have been unflinching Union men all their lives, and that neither the seductions of treason, nor the threats of traitors could shake their steadfast loyalty. Their devotion has cost them much, and what they have suffered has strikingly illustrated the proclamation to the people of Kentucky, which that arch — scoundrel, Simon Bolivar Buckner, issued last Septembe
Doc. 45.-occupation of Bowling Green, Ky. Gen. Buell's despatch. Louisville, February 15, 1862. To Major General-McClellan: Mitchell's division, by a forced march, reached the river at Bowling Green to-day, making a bridge to cross. The enemy burned the bridge at one o'clock in the morning, and were evacuating the place when he arrived. D. C. Buell, Brigadier-General Commanding. Gen. Buell's General order. The following is a general order, issued by Gen. Buell to the troops of General Mitchell's division, after their advance upon Bowling Green: General order no. 70. headquarters Third division, Camp John Q. Adams, Bowling Green, February 19, 1862. soldiers of the Third division: You have executed a march of forty miles in twenty-eight hours and a half. The fallen timber and other obstructions, opposed by the enemy to your movements, have been swept from your path. The fire of your artillery, and the bursting of your shells, announced your arrival. S
ains to be done. By order of Brig.-Gen. O. M. Mitchell, Commanding. Cincinnati Gazette narrative. Bowling Green, Ky., February 15. Our victory is completed! We are now in possession of Bowling Green. Last night, at about nine o'clock, Col. Turchin's brigade, consisting of the Eighteenth Ohio, Col. Stanley, the Thirty-seventh Indiana, Major Hall Commanding, the Twenty fourth Illinois, Col. Mihialotzs, the Nineteenth Illinois, Col. Turchin, together with sections of Loomis's, Edgarton's and Simonson's batteries, and three companies of Col. Kennett's cavalry, were formed in order, and marched rapidly to a ferry, a mile and a half below the town. A single boat was there, a kind of flat-boat, upon which about fifty infantry or a score of cavalry could pass at once. The river is about a hundred yards wide at this place, and the descent to the water on one side, and the ascent from it on the other, are both difficult, even when circumstances are favorable, but were particul
manding. Cincinnati Gazette narrative. Bowling Green, Ky., February 15. Our victory is completed! We are now in possession of Bowling Green. Last night, at about nine o'clock, Col. Turchin's brigade, consisting of the Eighteenth Ohio, Col. Stanley, the Thirty-seventh Indiana, Major Hall Commanding, the Twenty fourth Illinois, Col. Mihialotzs, the Nineteenth Illinois, Col. Turchin, together with sections of Loomis's, Edgarton's and Simonson's batteries, and three companies of Col. Kennett's cavalry, were formed in order, and marched rapidly to a ferry, a mile and a half below the town. A single boat was there, a kind of flat-boat, upon which about fifty infantry or a score of cavalry could pass at once. The river is about a hundred yards wide at this place, and the descent to the water on one side, and the ascent from it on the other, are both difficult, even when circumstances are favorable, but were particularly so last night, on account of the frozen and snowy ground.
. By order of Brig.-Gen. O. M. Mitchell, Commanding. Cincinnati Gazette narrative. Bowling Green, Ky., February 15. Our victory is completed! We are now in possession of Bowling Green. Last night, at about nine o'clock, Col. Turchin's brigade, consisting of the Eighteenth Ohio, Col. Stanley, the Thirty-seventh Indiana, Major Hall Commanding, the Twenty fourth Illinois, Col. Mihialotzs, the Nineteenth Illinois, Col. Turchin, together with sections of Loomis's, Edgarton's and Simonson's batteries, and three companies of Col. Kennett's cavalry, were formed in order, and marched rapidly to a ferry, a mile and a half below the town. A single boat was there, a kind of flat-boat, upon which about fifty infantry or a score of cavalry could pass at once. The river is about a hundred yards wide at this place, and the descent to the water on one side, and the ascent from it on the other, are both difficult, even when circumstances are favorable, but were particularly so last ni
he ponds along the road were filled with dead horses and cattle, as long as any cattle were to be found to fill them. We rested at noon at Cave City, which was very nearly destroyed. On the second day, we started for Bowling Green. The next morning was cold, with about an inch and a half of snow; but we were up betimes and on our way, the Nineteenth Illinois ahead as usual, with her blue flag waving triumphantly. Our road was obstructed, and was filled with signs of the rapid retreat of Hindman's forces. We pushed on vigorously, and made the miles rapidly disappear. Hearing repeatedly that the railroad bridge was destroyed, and that the confederates would now stand this side of the river, Col. Turchin ordered the cavalry and one battery ahead. The ranks opened to the right and left, and Capt. Loomis's battery dashed by in fine style, and reached Bowling Green about ten o'clock. We heard the cannon roar, and then we hurried on and reached the banks of the river opposite Bowlin
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