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George Bancroft (search for this): chapter 2
under the editorship of Cambridge men. After the first editor, William Tudor, there came a long line of Cambridge successors — Willard Phillips, Edward Tyrrel Channing, Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, John Gorham Palfrey, Francis Bowen, and, after some interval, James Russell Lowell and Charles Eliot Norton. The list of chief contributors to the first forty volumes of the Review, as appears from the Index published in 1878, would include, in addition to those already given, C. C. Felton, George Bancroft, H. W. Longfellow, and the elder Norton —— all Harvard instructors. Its connection with Cambridge was therefore well defined and unquestionable. Judge Story, then head of the Harvard Law School, who had for many years a higher foreign reputation than any other American author, thus wrote in 1819 to Sir William Scott: So great is the call for talents of all sorts in the active use of professional and other business in America, that few of our ablest men have leisure to devote exclus<
Knickerbocker (search for this): chapter 2
t, they differed enormously — Alcott and Parker, for instance, representing almost the opposite extremes of the ideal and practical; but so far as literature was concerned their aim was one. All wished to create such a literature, to hold it to a high standard and to make it representative of the new world in which it was born. Literature had in its plans a position which had been assigned to it in no previous outburst of the American mind. To these men and women, most of the New York Knickerbocker school probably appeared as triflers, and the North American contributors as merely academic. They reached doubtless but a limited audience, as do most reformers; they committed fantastic follies, but so do the saints everywhere. As a result they distinctly influenced the national literature; much, for instance, of the power now attributed to Emerson being really the unconscious result of the total movement. Fame is very chary of personal rights; it is difficult to erect a new altar.
Edward Tyrrel Channing (search for this): chapter 2
cay and neglect which resulted from the distractions of the Revolutionary War, and as forming an epoch in the intellectual history of the United States. This epoch may, however, be better indicated by the foundation of the North American Review, which immediately followed. This periodical, during far the larger part of its early career, was under the editorship of Cambridge men. After the first editor, William Tudor, there came a long line of Cambridge successors — Willard Phillips, Edward Tyrrel Channing, Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, John Gorham Palfrey, Francis Bowen, and, after some interval, James Russell Lowell and Charles Eliot Norton. The list of chief contributors to the first forty volumes of the Review, as appears from the Index published in 1878, would include, in addition to those already given, C. C. Felton, George Bancroft, H. W. Longfellow, and the elder Norton —— all Harvard instructors. Its connection with Cambridge was therefore well defined and unquestionable. <
Calvin E. Stowe (search for this): chapter 2
91): It was the project of a young enthusiast [Mr. Underwood himself], who desired to enlist the leading authors of New England in the crusade against slavery, and it had been the subject of conferences at intervals with Lowell, Longfellow, and Mrs. Stowe for more than three years. The following letters, both addressed to me,--I was then living in Worcester, Massachusetts,--will explain what occurred during these intervening years:-- Boston, November 21, 1853. Dear Sir, Messrs. J. P. Jewly determined upon. Probably, however, it will be commenced. The letters I wrote for the enlistment of contributors have been mostly answered favorably. We have already a very respectable list engaged. We are waiting to hear definitely from Mrs. Stowe, whom we hope will be induced to commence in the Feb. no. a new story. We are thankful for the interest you manifest by sending new names. I shall write to Mr. Hurlbut at once, and to the others in a day or two. Those who have already promi
Joseph Story (search for this): chapter 2
ning, Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, John Gorham Palfrey, Francis Bowen, and, after some interval, James Russell Lowell and Charles Eliot Norton. The list of chief contributors to the first forty volumes of the Review, as appears from the Index published in 1878, would include, in addition to those already given, C. C. Felton, George Bancroft, H. W. Longfellow, and the elder Norton —— all Harvard instructors. Its connection with Cambridge was therefore well defined and unquestionable. Judge Story, then head of the Harvard Law School, who had for many years a higher foreign reputation than any other American author, thus wrote in 1819 to Sir William Scott: So great is the call for talents of all sorts in the active use of professional and other business in America, that few of our ablest men have leisure to devote exclusively to literature or the fine arts, or to composition on abstract science. This obvious reason . . . will explain why we have few professional authors and those
Jared Sparks (search for this): chapter 2
the distractions of the Revolutionary War, and as forming an epoch in the intellectual history of the United States. This epoch may, however, be better indicated by the foundation of the North American Review, which immediately followed. This periodical, during far the larger part of its early career, was under the editorship of Cambridge men. After the first editor, William Tudor, there came a long line of Cambridge successors — Willard Phillips, Edward Tyrrel Channing, Edward Everett, Jared Sparks, John Gorham Palfrey, Francis Bowen, and, after some interval, James Russell Lowell and Charles Eliot Norton. The list of chief contributors to the first forty volumes of the Review, as appears from the Index published in 1878, would include, in addition to those already given, C. C. Felton, George Bancroft, H. W. Longfellow, and the elder Norton —— all Harvard instructors. Its connection with Cambridge was therefore well defined and unquestionable. Judge Story, then head of the Harv<
Thomas W. Parsons (search for this): chapter 2
respectable list engaged. We are waiting to hear definitely from Mrs. Stowe, whom we hope will be induced to commence in the Feb. no. a new story. We are thankful for the interest you manifest by sending new names. I shall write to Mr. Hurlbut at once, and to the others in a day or two. Those who have already promised to write are Mr. Carter (formerly of the Commonwealth), who will furnish a political article for each number, Mr. Hildreth (very much interested in the undertaking), Thos. W. Parsons, author of an excellent translation of Dante, Parke Godwin of the New York Evening Post, Mr. Ripley of the Tribune, Dr. Elder of Phila, H. D. Thoreau of Concord, Theodore Parker (my most valued friend), Edmund Quincy, James R. Lowell (from whom I have a most exquisite gem). Many to whom I have written have not replied as yet. I shall have the general supervision of the Magazine,intending to get the best aid from professed litterateurs in the several departments. We do expect to p
Josiah Quincy (search for this): chapter 2
Review (1815), that of the Dial (1840), and that of the Atlantic Monthly (1857). During each of these epochs a peculiarly important part was taken by Cambridge men. 1. the north American Review The North American Review, though preceded in Boston by the short-lived Massachusetts Magazine and the Monthly Anthology, yet achieved an influence and a prominence which these did not reach, and is still issued, though in another city and in another form. Of the Anthology Club of Boston, Josiah Quincy saidknowing intimately most of the members:-- Its labors may be considered as a true revival of polite learning in this country, after that decay and neglect which resulted from the distractions of the Revolutionary War, and as forming an epoch in the intellectual history of the United States. This epoch may, however, be better indicated by the foundation of the North American Review, which immediately followed. This periodical, during far the larger part of its early career, was
W. H. Page (search for this): chapter 2
and Lowell, so that this company also was half or almost half made up of Cantabrigians. At any rate, the two original editors, Lowell and Underwood, were Cantabrigians by residence; and Lowell could now transfer to it, on a more liberal scale, the plans which he and Robert Carter had formed for the short-lived Pioneer. In the later period of the magazine, Howells at one time resided in Cambridge, as did, for a year, his successor, Aldrich. Its last two editors, Messrs. H. E. Scudder and W. H. Page, have been and still are denizens of the University city. There has thus been no editor of the magazine, except Fields, who has not at some time dwelt in Cambridge. The following list comprises many of those who were during at least some period of the Atlantic's existence, if not the whole, to be classed as Cambridge authors, together with the total of contributions credited to each in the Atlantic Index, of 1888: W. D. Howells, 399; T. S. Perry, 355; H. E. Scudder, 196; O. W. Holmes,
Boston Atlas (search for this): chapter 2
brought little profit to their authors, brought sometimes disaster. Bowen, for instance, whose self-willed and somewhat disputative temperament made him many enemies, lost the Professorship of American History in Harvard University through a series of attacks on the Hungarian revolutionists for whom Kossuth had aroused much interest in this country. Bowen's views were strongly contested by a man of uncommon ability, Robert Carter, also of Cambridge, who wrote a series of papers in the Boston Atlas (1850) in defence of Kossuth and his party; and these papers, being reprinted in a pamphlet, were said to have caused the refusal of the Board of Overseers to confirm Bowen's nomination as Professor of History. Three years later, however, he was appointed Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity, a position which he held until his death. He was a man of immense reading, keen mind, and was not without those qualities which Lord Byron thought essential to a
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