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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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Thomas D. Harrison (search for this): chapter 1.28
land regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richard T. Knox and Daniel A. Fenton; Privates N. Lee Goldsborough, Lamar Holliday, J. McKenny White, Sommerville Sollers, D. Ridgely Howard, Thomas D. Harrison, and Daniel L. Thomas. The active pall-bearers were six members of James R. Herbert Camp, in uniform, of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old soldiers were present to testify their love and respect for the beloved old Major. At the grave the service of the Episcopal Church was conducted by Rev. Dr. Dame, a typical soldier; three volleys were fired over the grave; a bugler sounded taps, and all that was mortal of the grand old soldi
Louise Page (search for this): chapter 1.28
ed in gathering materials for a third volume, which it is probable will ultimately appear. With this end in view he spent much of last summer with his brother, Charles E. Goldsborough at Hunterstown, Pa., near Gettysburg and the battlefield. No one but Major Goldsborough has ever attempted to chronicle completely and historically the deeds and incidents connected with the Maryland Confederates. The Maryland Line, C. S. A., was created by Act of the Confederate Congress, and consisted of infantry, cavalry and artillery, under Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, whom General R. E. Lee declared, with diffuse compliments, most worthy to command Marylanders. A grandson of Colonel Baker Johnson of the Rebellion of 1776-‘83; he had under him some fifty cousins, and not one conscript or substitute! These are my jewels. The widow of Major Goldsborough was Miss Louise Page, of Virginia, connected with the distinguished Lee and Page families, her father being a cousin of General R. E. Lee
McHenry Howard (search for this): chapter 1.28
ant antagonist. Mrs. Goldsborough was escorted from Philadelphia by Mr. Fred. L. Pitts, an associate with Major Goldsborough on the Philadelphia Record, and a member of Captain William H. Murray's company in the First Maryland regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richard T. Knox and Daniel A. Fenton; Privates N. Lee Goldsborough, Lamar Holliday, J. McKenny White, Sommerville Sollers, D. Ridgely Howard, Thomas D. Harrison, and Daniel L. Thomas. The active pall-bearers were six members of James R. Herbert Camp, in uniform, of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old soldiers were present to testify their love and respect for the beloved
Baker Johnson (search for this): chapter 1.28
d in gathering materials for a third volume, which it is probable will ultimately appear. With this end in view he spent much of last summer with his brother, Charles E. Goldsborough at Hunterstown, Pa., near Gettysburg and the battlefield. No one but Major Goldsborough has ever attempted to chronicle completely and historically the deeds and incidents connected with the Maryland Confederates. The Maryland Line, C. S. A., was created by Act of the Confederate Congress, and consisted of infantry, cavalry and artillery, under Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, whom General R. E. Lee declared, with diffuse compliments, most worthy to command Marylanders. A grandson of Colonel Baker Johnson of the Rebellion of 1776-‘83; he had under him some fifty cousins, and not one conscript or substitute! These are my jewels. The widow of Major Goldsborough was Miss Louise Page, of Virginia, connected with the distinguished Lee and Page families, her father being a cousin of General R. E. Lee
Frederick L. Pitts (search for this): chapter 1.28
rs and Rev. William M. Dame, D. D., chaplain. The hearse and carriages came next, with the active pall-bearers beside the hearse, then followed delegations from the Society of the Confederate States Army and Navy in Maryland under Captain George W. Booth, the James R. Herbert Camp, U. C. V., survivors of the Baltimore City Guard battalion and the Union Veterans' Association, who were proud to honor their war-time valiant antagonist. Mrs. Goldsborough was escorted from Philadelphia by Mr. Fred. L. Pitts, an associate with Major Goldsborough on the Philadelphia Record, and a member of Captain William H. Murray's company in the First Maryland regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richar
Frank A. Bond (search for this): chapter 1.28
n, who were proud to honor their war-time valiant antagonist. Mrs. Goldsborough was escorted from Philadelphia by Mr. Fred. L. Pitts, an associate with Major Goldsborough on the Philadelphia Record, and a member of Captain William H. Murray's company in the First Maryland regiment, as also was the writer. The honorary pall-bearers (appointed and who were nearly all present) were: Brigadier-General George H. Steuart. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, Captain Wilson C. Nicholas, Major Frank A. Bond; Lieutenants Clapham Murray, McHenry Howard, Frank Markoe, Andrew C. Trippe, and Winfield Peters; Sergeants Richard T. Knox and Daniel A. Fenton; Privates N. Lee Goldsborough, Lamar Holliday, J. McKenny White, Sommerville Sollers, D. Ridgely Howard, Thomas D. Harrison, and Daniel L. Thomas. The active pall-bearers were six members of James R. Herbert Camp, in uniform, of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old soldiers were present to
Reuben Walton (search for this): chapter 1.28
elped carry the enemy's advanced works on Culp's Hill on the evening of the second day—July 2, 1863—the ascent being over huge rocks and other serious obstructions; yet while breaking the alignments and delaying the advance, the large boulders served in a measure to shield the men from the bullets of the enemy. Nightfall came, yet the brave band pushed on, directed by the continuous flash from the rifles behind the breastworks. When close upon the enemy, Major Goldsborough sought Lieutenant-Colonel Walton, commanding the Twenty-third Virginia—next on the left of the Second Maryland—who in the desperate situation proposed a combined assault, to which Goldsborough cheerfully assented, and promptly getting his three left companies in line, on the right of the Virginians, both advanced as rapidly as possible, executed a right half-wheel, enabling them to take the enemy in flank and reverse, and rushed upon the works. The Yankees skeedaddled to the rear and took refuge behind a support
Robert Edward Lee (search for this): chapter 1.28
cally the deeds and incidents connected with the Maryland Confederates. The Maryland Line, C. S. A., was created by Act of the Confederate Congress, and consisted of infantry, cavalry and artillery, under Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, whom General R. E. Lee declared, with diffuse compliments, most worthy to command Marylanders. A grandson of Colonel Baker Johnson of the Rebellion of 1776-‘83; he had under him some fifty cousins, and not one conscript or substitute! These are my jewels. ntry, cavalry and artillery, under Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, whom General R. E. Lee declared, with diffuse compliments, most worthy to command Marylanders. A grandson of Colonel Baker Johnson of the Rebellion of 1776-‘83; he had under him some fifty cousins, and not one conscript or substitute! These are my jewels. The widow of Major Goldsborough was Miss Louise Page, of Virginia, connected with the distinguished Lee and Page families, her father being a cousin of General R. E. Lee
E. R. Dorsey (search for this): chapter 1.28
on he was well fitted for the duties of a soldier and an officer in field service. His company, with others, having been sent to Harper's Ferry, Va., to aid in subduing John Brown's murderous raid, in October, 1859, they closed upon the United States Marines who battered down the door of Brown's Fort and rushed in, Goldsborough and another of his company were the first militiamen to enter with the marines. In May, 1861, Goldsborough, in his thirtieth year, enlisted as a private in Captain E. R. Dorsey's company in the First Maryland Infantry. In June following he was elected captain of Company A to succeed Captain Bradley T. Johnson, promoted to Major, serving thus until the muster out of the regiment, August 17, 1862, participating in both the campaigns in the Valley of Virginia, i. e., in 1861 under General Joseph E. Johnston, and in 1862 under Stonewall Jackson; also in the First Manassas battle and campaign in 1861 and in the Seven Days Battles below Richmond, in June and July
William M. Dame (search for this): chapter 1.28
Cemetery and moved to the Confederate plot. In front was a drum-and-fife corps, followed by a volunteer battalion from the Fifth regiment infantry, M. N. G., under Captain N. Lee Goldsborough. Then came the honorary pall-bearers and Rev. William M. Dame, D. D., chaplain. The hearse and carriages came next, with the active pall-bearers beside the hearse, then followed delegations from the Society of the Confederate States Army and Navy in Maryland under Captain George W. Booth, the James R. of which Major Goldsborough was a member. Despite the inclement weather, many gallant old soldiers were present to testify their love and respect for the beloved old Major. At the grave the service of the Episcopal Church was conducted by Rev. Dr. Dame, a typical soldier; three volleys were fired over the grave; a bugler sounded taps, and all that was mortal of the grand old soldier-patriot were left to await the trump of the resurrection morn. And it is comforting to know that in life muc
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