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hip them if they attack us, and the North will then learn it can't at once overrun us as it fancied. The leaders will pause. There will be a reaction up there. We will work all the harder and all the better for our victory, drilling our men and consolidating our resources. The Northern cities will become discontented. Foreign nations will ask when the cotton ports are to be open. The North will have no reply. We shall be better able to fight in November than we shall be to fight in June. Every week's delay will add to the complications and weakness of the North, and the end of the year will find them further from their aim than ever — divisions in their councils, even disturbances in their populations, while we, inspired by the approach of success, will exhibit increasing energy and unanimity." A part of the programme has been already accomplished, but it does not follow that the remainder of the prophecy will be fulfilled with as much nicety — so far as the result of the ac
May, 8 AD (search for this): article 7
An Englishman's views of the American war,Mr. Russell's letter to the London Times. Mr. Russell's last letter, published in the London Times August 20th,bears date at Washington, August 5th. The subjoined extracts embrace the principal portions of it: Secession policy. "Let us only hold on till October, and we are safe." That, or something like it, was said to me over and over again in the South by men why play no inconsiderable part in the mystery drama of the Confederates. And when I asked one of these gentlemen, more than two months ago, what chance there was of the North giving the South all that time, I was answered almost in these words: "We are bound to go to the assistance of Virginia. The whole of the Northern frontier abounds in good position, which can be fed by the rail from the South. The Abolitionists will come and give us battle. We are certain to whip them if they attack us, and the North will then learn it can't at once overrun us as it fancied. The
give us battle. We are certain to whip them if they attack us, and the North will then learn it can't at once overrun us as it fancied. The leaders will pause. There will be a reaction up there. We will work all the harder and all the better for our victory, drilling our men and consolidating our resources. The Northern cities will become discontented. Foreign nations will ask when the cotton ports are to be open. The North will have no reply. We shall be better able to fight in November than we shall be to fight in June. Every week's delay will add to the complications and weakness of the North, and the end of the year will find them further from their aim than ever — divisions in their councils, even disturbances in their populations, while we, inspired by the approach of success, will exhibit increasing energy and unanimity." A part of the programme has been already accomplished, but it does not follow that the remainder of the prophecy will be fulfilled with as much nic
An Englishman's views of the American war,Mr. Russell's letter to the London Times. Mr. Russell's last letter, published in the London Times August 20th,bears date at Washington, August 5th. The subjoined extracts embrace the principal portions of it: Secession policy. "Let us only hold on till October, and we are safe." That, or something like it, was said to me over and over again in the South by men why play no inconsiderable part in the mystery drama of the Confederates. And when I asked one of these gentlemen, more than two months ago, what chance there was of the North giving the South all that time, I was answered almost in these words: "We are bound to go to the assistance of Virginia. The whole of the Northern frontier abounds in good position, which can be fed by the rail from the South. The Abolitionists will come and give us battle. We are certain to whip them if they attack us, and the North will then learn it can't at once overrun us as it fancied. The
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