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Cherokee, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ily and forage for his work-animals; a crop of cotton, for the purchase of supplies; a small crop of sugar-cane; and an ample supply of all sorts of vegetables. To these ends he gave a good deal of hard labor in the field and garden, but he did not neglect the simple but delightful recreation of the flower-garden. His house was shaded by a grove of the fragrant pride of China, and the spacious yard contained towering live-oaks, pecans, and other beautiful native forest-trees. A hedge of Cherokee rose with its snowy bloom protected the inclosure; and an ample orchard of figs and peaches furnished its fruits for the table. When General Johnston went there, he was told leeks were the only vegetable that would thrive, but he soon proved that hardly any vegetable known to American gardens would fail under ordinary care. It is true that he was careful, patient, industrious, and skillful in plant-nurture; but all this is necessary to the best success anywhere. The frequent allusions
Samuel M. Williams (search for this): chapter 11
ic nature found a stay in his family. His two infant boys, one born on the plantation, were a great comfort to him, delighting as he did in the company of little children; and his wife not only bore privations, and managed her household with contentment and good-humor, but whiled away the weary hours by her resources in music and painting. If friends were few they were steadfast. Colonel Love came to see him whenever he could, and wrote often; and General Hamilton occasionally. Colonel Samuel M. Williams wrote him, when his fortunes were lowest, to draw on his bank at Galveston according to his necessities. Hancock, Preston, Burnley, and some others, retained their interest, and manifested it as occasion offered. The letters appended present a fair record of his plantation life and current of thought, and illustrate the facts and characteristics already mentioned. The first extract is from a letter written by General Johnston in the spring of 1847 to the author, who had recently
ession of the most vigorous thoughts connected with military operations, and I am convinced that he then possessed all the high powers of mind which he has lately displayed; that his capacity is no sudden endowment; that the great strategetic problems solved by him have often undergone the severest scrutiny of close investigation. These things are true of all minds which are accounted great on any subject. The vast conceptions of Hannibal, Caesar, Napoleon, Newton, Cicero, Homer, Angelo, Wren, Davy, etc., following the analogies of Nature, were embodiments which were developed by the active and toilsome labors of the mind. Hence the confidence, energy, and readiness, when the emergency arises. They are no sudden inspirations. We tread with rapidity and confidence the path we have often traveled over, all others with tardy doubtfulness. We hear nothing of the progress of the war. There is too much to be done with too little means. An acknowledged principle of war is that, w
George Hancock (search for this): chapter 11
is bank at Galveston according to his necessities. Hancock, Preston, Burnley, and some others, retained their etters are given from a large correspondence with Mr. Hancock and the writer: China Grove, February 28, 1847. Dear Hancock: You have long since, I fear, condemned me for neglect, and appearances are so much against me s, it ought never to be forgotten. Writing to Mr. Hancock, October 21, 1847, General Johnston says: Won wrote as follows on the 22d of March, 1848, to Mr. Hancock: We like our residence here, although entirs as we want; this latter remark applies to Sid and Hancock, too. All these things, with butter and milk, and air guidance in what direction his wishes inclined. Hancock and Burnley, who were intimate personal friends of Brazoria County, Texas, December 2, 1848. Dear Hancock: Your letter of the 10th November has been received. . G. Hancock. To General A. S. Johnston. Mr. Hancock further says, in a letter of April 22, 1849:
Warren D. C. Hall (search for this): chapter 11
to the writer. his plantation, China Grove. Texas coast scenery. game. his family. occupation. manual labor. Warren D. C. Hall. the writer's boyish reminiscences of China Grove. General Johnston's relations with children. Irish John. shoothe axe, are familiar to my hands, and that not for recreation, but for bread. He had but one near neighbor, Colonel Warren D. C. Hall, who, with his wife, rendered General Johnston's family every friendly office that kind hearts could suggest. Colonel Hall was one of Austin's colonists, and prominent in the earlier conflicts of the revolutionary struggle. He was elderly, and had not been fortunate; so that his large estate was laboring under embarrassments, from which I believe it was subwhen he fired. A twenty-pound gobbler dropped, one flew off, and the third escaped, evidently wounded. An hour later Colonel Hall came over, and mentioned that a wounded wild-turkey had run into his blacksmithshop at full speed and dropped dead. I
Newman Noggs (search for this): chapter 11
f thought, and illustrate the facts and characteristics already mentioned. The first extract is from a letter written by General Johnston in the spring of 1847 to the author, who had recently left him: Sid is a fine boy, grows well, and talks a great deal about brother Willie. Like all healthy children, he is considered a prodigy, physically and mentally. His mother will give you the facts sustaining this opinion, and can do it better than I can. With the exception of the loss of Newman Noggs, A horse, whose name was considered characteristic. whom no skill could save, everything continues to thrive with us; the dairy, the piggery, the poultry-yard-and a well-filled poultry-yard, with no market at hand to tempt the cupidity of owners, is no contemptible thing in the opinion of a person in robust health. We have bushels of figs, and wish you were here to enjoy them. We have also a fine patch of sweet-potatoes. A few letters are given from a large correspondence with M
Charles Lyell (search for this): chapter 11
at he was accustomed to run rapidly over Euclid and other mathematical works with which he was familiar, reviving at a glance their trains of reasoning. General Johnston read slowly, and not many books; but he thought much on what he read. His habit was to revolve what he read in every possible relation to practical life. He was familiar with Shakespeare; he enjoyed Dickens, and drew largely upon Gil Blas for illustration. He was fond of physical science, and Mrs. Somerville and Sir Charles Lyell were favorites with him. But, at the time of which I speak, his chief literary delight was a translation of Herodotus. He was the first to impress upon me the veracity of the Old Historian, and to point out the care with which he discriminated between what he saw, what he heard, and what he surmised or inferred. While I was with him, a report came that his friend, Colonel Jason Rogers, commanding at Monterey, was cooped up in the Black Fort, with a small garrison — the Louisville
John W. Caldwell (search for this): chapter 11
ousand dollars more. You would be surprised, I think, at what I have achieved in three months with my limited means. If a good opportunity to sell occurs, I will not let it pass .... The successful cultivation of the cane here is no longer a problem. Everywhere it has been tried in this neighborhood it has succeeded excellently well. The yield has been great; and the quality Mr. Kenner, I understand, says equal, if not superior, to Louisiana sugar made by the most improved means. Mr. Caldwell, fifteen miles from here, on the same kind of soil as mine (peach-land The wild-peach, a kind of laurel, grows on the low ridges and drier spots of the alluvion.), made 104 hogsheads (or thousands of pounds) of sugar, besides molasses, with sixteen hands, which is selling from eight to ten cents per pound. Sweeney has been quite as successful, and others that I have heard from. Your kind invitation and offers to us will be long gratefully remembered. It is at the dead point that
Chapter 10: plantation-life. Reception at Galveston. reasons for retiring from the army. generosity to the writer. his plantation, China Grove. Texas coast scenery. game. his family. occupation. manual labor. Warren D. C. Hall. the writer's boyish reminiscences of China Grove. General Johnston's relations with children. Irish John. shooting. close observation of the habits of animals. the crested Wood-Duck. the wounded eagle. General Johnston's ideas of the conduct of life; of education. his Love of justice and breadth of view. books. opinions on the War; of Colonel Rogers; of General Taylor. his view of how the Mexican War should be conducted. letter to Preston, giving his estimate of General Taylor. reserve. gradual isolation in his solitude. almost forgotten. exceptions. illustrations of his character and plantation-life from his letters. letters giving his views of education. preference for an American training. notions on rhetoric, mathemat
eighing the matter of the book as he went along, and reflecting on it afterward. But, during this period, I recollect that he was accustomed to run rapidly over Euclid and other mathematical works with which he was familiar, reviving at a glance their trains of reasoning. General Johnston read slowly, and not many books; but he thought much on what he read. His habit was to revolve what he read in every possible relation to practical life. He was familiar with Shakespeare; he enjoyed Dickens, and drew largely upon Gil Blas for illustration. He was fond of physical science, and Mrs. Somerville and Sir Charles Lyell were favorites with him. But, at the time of which I speak, his chief literary delight was a translation of Herodotus. He was the first to impress upon me the veracity of the Old Historian, and to point out the care with which he discriminated between what he saw, what he heard, and what he surmised or inferred. While I was with him, a report came that his frien
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