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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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r accurate fire. From the best sources of information, I learn that our killed and wounded amounted to eight thousand, exclusive of a few prisoners; one thousand of our wounded were left behind, and a convention entered into for the burial of the dead. It has been stated by Northern journals that we lost thirty thousand in all, but this is pure fiction. Among our losses in this engagement were General Stark and Brigadier-General Branch killed; Brigadier-Generals Anderson, Wright, Lawton, Armsted, Ripley, Ransom, and Jones, wounded. I learn that during the thirty hours, or more, which intervened between the engagement and our retreat, little was left upon the battle-field in cannon or arms, but every thing worth attention was carried off. Although the enemy claim to have captured thousands of arms and dozens of cannon, I need not add that this, for the most part, was all imagination. McClellan's loss has been placed at twelve thousand killed, wounded, and missing; and I think t
retreating ranks, the whole vicinity of the bridge seemed strewn with bodies, horses, wagons, and artillery. Both attacks of the enemy upon our wings had failed, and they had been repulsed with fearful slaughter. Franklin, Sumner, Hooker, Mansfield, and other corps commanders on their right, had been fought to a stand-still. They were exhausted and powerless. Burnside, on their left, had been fearfully handled by Longstreet, and was driven in confusion upon the bridge, which he held witrms and dozens of cannon, I need not add that this, for the most part, was all imagination. McClellan's loss has been placed at twelve thousand killed, wounded, and missing; and I think the estimate below reality. Among his killed were Generals Mansfield, Richardson, Hartsuff, and others; and among a fearful list of generals wounded were Sumner, Hooker, Meagher, Duryea, Max Weber, Dana, Sedgwick, French, Ricketts, Rodman, and others. It is almost unnecessary for me to say that McClellan
D. H. Hill (search for this): chapter 44
. Under these circumstances, his divergence from the true route to the Ferry by Petersville and Crampton's Gap, to attack Hill in the strong positions of Boonesborough and Turner's Gap, was unaccountable, unless, indeed, he was misled by fabulous rused into Maryland again, and was quietly waiting in Lee's lines for the Federal advance. When Lee was made aware of D. H. Hill's retreat from the various gaps in the South Mountain, and that McClellan's army was pouring through them, he became fuposed as to command all approach to the bridges over the Antietam; Longstreet commanding the right, Lee the centre, and D. H. Hill the left; but our line appeared so weak, scattered as it was over more than four miles, that it seemed almost impossiblerly concealed from view; and when the enemy had advanced sufficiently far, several of our batteries opened upon them, and Hill's troops attacking in front and flank, unceremoniously began the work of slaughter. Their surprise, confusion, and loss w
Fitz-Hugh Lee (search for this): chapter 44
McClellan's unaccountable inaction activity of Lee and Jackson engagements at the South Mountain ment would have left Maryland unprotected, and Lee might have marched on to Washington without sern's movements. He could have had no doubt that Lee would have willingly availed himself of such a least; or, by suddenly and rapidly marching on Lee and Longstreet, have forced an engagement, and into Maryland again, and was quietly waiting in Lee's lines for the Federal advance. When Lee wLee was made aware of D. H. Hill's retreat from the various gaps in the South Mountain, and that McClell the Antietam; Longstreet commanding the right, Lee the centre, and D. H. Hill the left; but our li bided our time patiently, feeling assured that Lee had successfully deceived them as to our positiheir troops in that direction, thus forewarning Lee where to send all available reenforcements thated up towards our lines. They were met by Fitz-Hugh Lee, and sharp fighting ensued; but the latter
he foe was safely screened in their original position of the morning. This first attack had been opened on our left by Hooker's corps. Fighting on the left had now lasted several hours-our men were thoroughly exhausted, and unable to advance fe shock of short duration: beaten again and again, they were at last driven beyond the position originally occupied, when Hooker's attack began the previous afternoon. Through woods and copse, across corn-fields and ploughed fields, grassy slopesoth attacks of the enemy upon our wings had failed, and they had been repulsed with fearful slaughter. Franklin, Sumner, Hooker, Mansfield, and other corps commanders on their right, had been fought to a stand-still. They were exhausted and powerlelled were Generals Mansfield, Richardson, Hartsuff, and others; and among a fearful list of generals wounded were Sumner, Hooker, Meagher, Duryea, Max Weber, Dana, Sedgwick, French, Ricketts, Rodman, and others. It is almost unnecessary for me to
red to make any decided advance in their centre or left. It would appear that McClellan was as totally unaware of our position as of our strength, for he instantly opened a furious cannonade along our whole front, and on his left (commanded by Burnside) the storm of shot and shell was so fierce and incessant that numerous missiles passed harmlessly over our heads, and fell within the village or town of Sharpsburgh, causing much destruction of property. Perhaps it was the desire of McClellan tks of the enemy upon our wings had failed, and they had been repulsed with fearful slaughter. Franklin, Sumner, Hooker, Mansfield, and other corps commanders on their right, had been fought to a stand-still. They were exhausted and powerless. Burnside, on their left, had been fearfully handled by Longstreet, and was driven in confusion upon the bridge, which he held with a few cannon, and suffered every moment from our batteries on rising ground. We did not desire the bridge, or it might hav
James B. Ricketts (search for this): chapter 44
attention was carried off. Although the enemy claim to have captured thousands of arms and dozens of cannon, I need not add that this, for the most part, was all imagination. McClellan's loss has been placed at twelve thousand killed, wounded, and missing; and I think the estimate below reality. Among his killed were Generals Mansfield, Richardson, Hartsuff, and others; and among a fearful list of generals wounded were Sumner, Hooker, Meagher, Duryea, Max Weber, Dana, Sedgwick, French, Ricketts, Rodman, and others. It is almost unnecessary for me to say that McClellan claimed this battle as a great victory for the Union cause, but did not do so until fully assured of our retreat into Virginia. Why his boastful despatch to Washington was not penned before our retreat from Sharpsburgh is evidence sufficient to show that he still feared, and would not shout until he was out of the woods. In truth, the Northern press acknowledged that with an inferior force we had thrashed them
Washington (search for this): chapter 44
icketts, Rodman, and others. It is almost unnecessary for me to say that McClellan claimed this battle as a great victory for the Union cause, but did not do so until fully assured of our retreat into Virginia. Why his boastful despatch to Washington was not penned before our retreat from Sharpsburgh is evidence sufficient to show that he still feared, and would not shout until he was out of the woods. In truth, the Northern press acknowledged that with an inferior force we had thrashed thnged on either side, nothing of moment occurred; and our whole army was established on the south bank ere the Federals had positive knowledge of the movement. When McClellan heard of our backward movement on the nineteenth, he telegraphed to Washington: I do not know if the enemy is falling back to an interior position, or re-crossing the river. We may safely claim the victory as ours. He did not assert this until more than thirty hours had elapsed subsequent to the engagement at Sharpsburg
on or arms, but every thing worth attention was carried off. Although the enemy claim to have captured thousands of arms and dozens of cannon, I need not add that this, for the most part, was all imagination. McClellan's loss has been placed at twelve thousand killed, wounded, and missing; and I think the estimate below reality. Among his killed were Generals Mansfield, Richardson, Hartsuff, and others; and among a fearful list of generals wounded were Sumner, Hooker, Meagher, Duryea, Max Weber, Dana, Sedgwick, French, Ricketts, Rodman, and others. It is almost unnecessary for me to say that McClellan claimed this battle as a great victory for the Union cause, but did not do so until fully assured of our retreat into Virginia. Why his boastful despatch to Washington was not penned before our retreat from Sharpsburgh is evidence sufficient to show that he still feared, and would not shout until he was out of the woods. In truth, the Northern press acknowledged that with an i
Fitz-John Porter (search for this): chapter 44
irty hours had elapsed subsequent to the engagement at Sharpsburgh! Some few hours after the above telegram, he consoled the authorities at Washington by saying: Our victory is complete The enemy is driven (?) back into Virginia. Maryland and Pennsylvania are now safe! Again he added; The Confederates succeeded in crossing the Potomac on Friday morning with all their transports and wounded, except some three hundred of the latter! On the twentieth, however, their army began to move Fitz-John Porter taking the advance, who judged, from the extremely quiet look of all things on the Virginia shore, that we were far inland. Barnes's brigade of Pennsylvanians, supported by one of regulars, under chief command of General Sykes, moved towards the river, and forded the stream at Boteler's Mills. Heavy guns were planted on the Maryland shore to cover their crossing. Jackson had felt certain that the enemy would attempt to pursue, and he made no display of force likely to intimidate t
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