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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies. Search the whole document.

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W. M. Polk (search for this): chapter 7
to our right than it had done the day before. Polk's Corps was transferred to the right of Hood's.ght, where it was formed on the prolongation of Polk's line. Kelly's Cavalry, composed of Allen's aen he commits the unpardonable error of placing Polk's Corps during the whole of this affair near Ne I was not only on the right, where he places Polk, but sent to him for a good division, with the sition General Johnston erroneously assigns General Polk during the 26th, 27th and 28th, I received the two remaining corps commanders, Hardee and Polk, who shortly joined us. They were instructed toenemy's left flank remaining as represented. Polk was then, for the first time, ordered to my posemy. I presume he had in remembrance Lieutenant General Polk's and my urgent recommendation that h in mind that tile animus displayed towards General Polk and myself, never became apparent till afteountain, that we lost the brave and magnanimous Polk, and with him much of the history of this remar[3 more...]
James Longstreet (search for this): chapter 7
d not be attacked, such as the one occupied by the enemy after recrossing Little Pumpkinvine creek. However, had General Johnston given me orders to attack at all hazard, I would have done so. It is true I went into battle under protest at Gettysburg, because I desired to turn Round Top Mountain; but, notwithstanding, I was true in every sense of the word to the orders of my commander till, wounded, I was borne from the field. During three yearsservice, under Generals Lee, Jackson, and Longstreet, I was never charged with being too late in any of the many battles in which I was engaged, before reporting for duty with the Army of the West. When General Johnston said as usual, I suggested that we attack the left flank of the enemy. I presume he had in remembrance Lieutenant General Polk's and my urgent recommendation that he turn upon and attack Sherman at Adairsville, just before he placed his Army upon the untenable ridge in rear of Cassville, with women and children of the tow
P. R. Cleburne (search for this): chapter 7
essary in the morning of the 27th to transfer Cleburne's Division of Hardee's Corps to our right, whccupied the interval, of half-a-mile, between Cleburne's right and Little Pumpkinvine creek. * * * * the noise of this contest revealed to Major General Cleburne the manoeuvre to turn his right, he brxtended my lines as far as possible. He sent Cleburne's Division to report to me. General Cleburne our own cavalry. As Howard's Corps advanced, Cleburne was directed to deploy quickly into line; the written field report I add, I enclose Major General Cleburne's report, and will forward others as sat the time of the engagement. Therefore General Cleburne brought his report of this affair to me, ich rested on Little Pumpkin-vine creek, with Cleburne's Division still on my extreme right and unden from General Wheeler's cavalry stationed on Cleburne's right, just across Little Pumpkin-vine cree reached me on the morning of the 28th, after Cleburne's repulse of the enemy on the afternoon and n[4 more...]
to transfer Cleburne's Division of Hardee's Corps to our right, where it was formed on the prolongation of Polk's line. Kelly's Cavalry, composed of Allen's and Hannon's Alabama brigades, together less than a thousand (1000) men; occupied the inte of half-a-mile, between Cleburne's right and Little Pumpkinvine creek. * * * * Between 5 and 6 o'clock in the afternoon, Kelly's skirmishers were driven in by a body of Federal cavalry, whose advance was supported by the Fourth Corps. * * * * As so Major General Cleburne the manoeuvre to turn his right, he brought the right brigade of his second line, Granberry's, to Kelly's support, by forming it on the right of his first line. * * * The Fourth Corps came on in deep order, and assailed the The enemy's left flank. I have a strong impression that the officer to whom General Wheeler refers was the gallant General Kelly, who was afterwards killed in battle. It might be supposed, upon reading General Johnston's recital of this his se
's Narrative, pages 328, 329, 330. We found, next morning, that the Federal line extended much further to our right than it had done the day before. Polk's Corps was transferred to the right of Hood's. * * * The Federal troops extended their entrenched lines so rapidly to their left, that it was found necessary in the morning of the 27th to transfer Cleburne's Division of Hardee's Corps to our right, where it was formed on the prolongation of Polk's line. Kelly's Cavalry, composed of Allen's and Hannon's Alabama brigades, together less than a thousand (1000) men; occupied the interval, of half-a-mile, between Cleburne's right and Little Pumpkinvine creek. * * * * Between 5 and 6 o'clock in the afternoon, Kelly's skirmishers were driven in by a body of Federal cavalry, whose advance was supported by the Fourth Corps. * * * * As soon as the noise of this contest revealed to Major General Cleburne the manoeuvre to turn his right, he brought the right brigade of his second line, G
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 7
nge induced me to send a telegram of inquiry to the Commanding General on the i6th inst. His reply but confirmed previous apprehensions. There can be but one question which you and I can entertain, that is, what will best promote the public good; and to each of you I confidently look for the sacrifice of every personal consideration in conflict with that object. The order has been executed, and I cannot suspend it without making the case worse than it was before the order was issued. Jefferson Davis. After the receipt of the above telegram, I returned to General Johnston's room, alone, and urged him, for the good of the country, to pocket the correspondence, remain in command, and fight for Atlanta, as Sherman was at the very gates of the city. To this my second appeal he made about the same reply as in the first instance. I then referred to the great embarrassment of the position in which I had been placed; asserting, moreover, I did not even know the position of the two rem
on of his forces on the right of my corps. He was directed to place his troops in a column of brigades, in the rear of my immediate right, which was the right of Hindman's Division, with Granberry's brigade in rear of the column, so as to bring it on our extreme right when deployed into line; he was also instructed to allow the Feeral Johnston's own Narrative, is unaccountably inserted by him on pages 585 and 586: On the morning of the 26th, the enemy found to be extending their left. Hindman's Division was withdrawn from my left, and placed in position on my right, the enemy continuing to extend his left. Major General Cleburne, with his division, was ordered to report to me, and was massed on Hindman's right. On the morning of the 27th, the enemy known to be extending rapidly to the left, attempting to turn my right as they extended. Cleburne was deployed to meet them, and, at half-past 5. p. m., a very stubborn attack was made on his division, extending to the right, where
Stephen D. Lee (search for this): chapter 7
under protest at Gettysburg, because I desired to turn Round Top Mountain; but, notwithstanding, I was true in every sense of the word to the orders of my commander till, wounded, I was borne from the field. During three yearsservice, under Generals Lee, Jackson, and Longstreet, I was never charged with being too late in any of the many battles in which I was engaged, before reporting for duty with the Army of the West. When General Johnston said as usual, I suggested that we attack the lee unanimous sentiment expressed on this occasion was to this effect: In the name of Heaven, what is to become of us? Here we are with the depots for recruits drained, from Mobile to Richmond, all the troops having been sent either to us or to General Lee, in Virginia; our Army fifty or sixty miles from Dalton, no general battle fought, and our Commander talking of Macon, one hundred miles beyond Atlanta, as being the place to fall back upon! This gloomy outlook brought about the comparison
W. J. Hardee (search for this): chapter 7
the morning of the 27th to transfer Cleburne's Division of Hardee's Corps to our right, where it was formed on the prolongathim at the time, in lieu of forwarding it through Lieutenant General Hardee to whose corps he was attached. Again, in refe line, and to assail that flank at dawn next day. Polk and Hardee were instructed to join in the battle successively, obliqu us greatly the advantage if a general battle ensued; that Hardee and Polk could be in readiness to come to my assistance, irs were dispatched for the two remaining corps commanders, Hardee and Polk, who shortly joined us. They were instructed to he so to be, unless the order was countermanded. Lieutenant Generals Hardee and Stewart then joined me in a telegram to the I did not hear. At the close of it, however, you and General Hardee and I went into the Adjutant General's office, and togollows: Richmond, July 18th, I864. to Generals Hood, Hardee and Stewart. Your telegram of this date received. A c
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 7
decided. The, following extract from a letter of Lieutenant General A. P. Stewart will show that I was desirous General Johnston should remain in command: St. Louis, August 7th, 1872. General J. B. Hood. my Dear General:--Your letter of the 25th ultimo was received some days since, and I avail myself of the first opportunity to answer it. You ask me to send you a statement setting forth the facts as you (I) understand them, of the circumstances attending the removal of General J. E. Johnston from the command of our Army in Georgia, in 1864, and my appointment to succeed him. It gives me pleasure to comply with your request. * * * Monday morning,(July i8th,)you will remember we met about sunrise in the road near Johnston's headquarters; and I then informed you of the object of seeking an interview, and that was that we should all three unite in an effort to prevail on General Johnston to withhold the order, and retain command of the Army until the impending battle should
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