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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Shiloh Church (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
moves up the Tennessee to Pittsburg Landing Sidney Johnston advances from Corinth, Miss. assails Grant's front near Shiloh Church Sherman and McClernand driven Grant borne back Buell and Lew Wallace arrive the Rebels driven losses Halleck tae and Ohio Railroad. The country hence to Corinth is rolling, and generally wooded. Two or three miles southward is Shiloh Church, and some ten miles farther is the road-crossing known as Monterey, where there were half-a-dozen houses. The regiondirect road to Corinth, with Gen. McClernand's; behind his right, and Gen. Sherman's still further to the right, with Shiloh church in his front, on a road leading also, but more circuitously, to Corinth. Get. Hurlbut's division lay in the rear of Willich's regiment, on his right, fighting gallantly for the possession of a point of timber some 500 yards east of Shiloh church. Hence the Rebel army could be seen re-forming its lines to the southward, with a battery by the church, and another
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
successive reenforcements to about 15,000 The Richmond Dispatch has a letter from one of the officers, dated Augusta. Ga., Feb. 22, who says: Our troops number about 18,000. The Nashville Patriot, of about Feb. 19, gives a list of the regiments present, with the strength of each, which foots up 13,829, and is evidently incomplete. men. Most of them were Tennesseans, with about 2,000 Mississippians, 1,200 Virginians, 1,000 Kentuckians, and a thin regiment each from Alabama, Arkansas, and Texas. The fort was commanded by two or three points farther inland, within cannon-shot; the country rolling to the bluffs of the Tennessee: some of the hills midway having an elevation of about 300 feet. Deep ravines, with steep, rocky sides, especially near the bluffs of the Cumberland, separated these hills, and, with the tall, dense, primitive forests generally prevailing, afforded admirable positions for defensive warfare. A heavy and difficult abatis in good part surrounded the fortress la
Florence, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ess, and some from desertion; some regiments leaving Bowling Green with six or seven hundred men, and reaching Corinth with but half of this number. The towns through which we passed were left full of sick men: and many were sent off to hospitals at some distance from our route. Pollard makes Johnston's army at Murfreesboroa but 17,000. Directly after the capture of Fort Henry, Commander Phelps, with the wooden gunboats Conestoga, Tyler, and Lexington, steamed up the Tennessee to Florence, Ala., at the foot of the Muscle Shoals, where he captured two steamboats, and constrained the Rebels to burn six others; he having burnt the railroad bridge near Benton on the way. The wholly unexpected appearance of the National flag in North Alabama, where slaves were comparatively few, and at least three-fourths of the people had stubbornly opposed Secession, was a welcome spectacle to thousands, and was greeted with enthusiastic demonstrations of loyalty. Com. Foote, with the gunboats
Caffey (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
nerally wooded. Two or three miles southward is Shiloh Church, and some ten miles farther is the road-crossing known as Monterey, where there were half-a-dozen houses. The region is thinly and recently settled; still mainly covered by the primitiveon the 4th so deepened the mire of the narrow, wretched roads, that his army was by that time but fairly concentrated at Monterey, thence moving with the utmost caution until within three land a half miles of our pickets, where, unable to advance farere practicable. This is pretty fair, but not strictly accordant with the dispatch which he, after sending back from Monterey a request to Gen. Grant for permission to send a mounted party to the battle-field under a flag of truce to bury his dea Rebel army at Corinth; and, though Gen. Pope arrived from Missouri on the 22d, with a reenforcement of 25,000 men, even Monterey was not occupied by us till the 1st of May, when Gen. Halleck's army had been increased by accessions from various quart
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
overwhelming strength from all our forces in that part of Kentucky, resolved to anticipate it; A Rebel letter to the Louisville (Nashville) Courier, says: The enemy in front occupied Somerset with several regiments, and Columbia with an equa, including, besides three Free States, Tennessee, and all of Kentucky east of the Cumberland, with his headquarters at Louisville; where he still remained when his advance consisting of some 16,000 men, led by Gen. O. M. Mitchel, moved, Feb. 11, been appropriated to private use. The bridges and roads northward were speedily repaired, and railroad connection with Louisville reopened. The wealthier classes had in great part left, or remained sullenly disloyal; but among the mechanics and labrendezvous of the expedition was at a little place called Danville, where the railroad from Memphis to Clarkesville and Louisville crosses the river. The gunboats Tyler and Lexington had already made a reconnoissance up the Tennessee, meeting their
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
de, advanced along the west bank of the river, and Com. Foote, with his gunboats, moved slowly up and attacked the fort from the water. Com. Foote formed his vessels in two lines: the iron-clads Cincinnati (flag-ship), Essex, Carondelet, and St. Louis, in front, while the old wooden Conestoga, Tyler, and Lexington, formed a second line some distance astern, and out of the range of the enemy's fire, throwing shell over the iron-clads into and about the fort. Thus advancing slowly and firing field and the dead; but the losses were fairly equalized, while the Rebels had the spoil of our camps — though they could carry off but little of it — and the prisoners. Maj. Gen. Halleck, commanding the Department of the Mississippi, left St. Louis directly after receiving news of the Shiloh battles, April 19, 1862. and reached Pittsburg Landing by steamboat two or three days thereafter. Meantime, and for weeks following, no attempt was made against the Rebel army at Corinth; and, tho
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
umberland across the Tennessee Nashville recovered Columbus, Ky. New Madrid Island no.10 Fort Pillow Memphis first siege of Vicksburg Grant moves up the Tennessee to Pittsburg Landing Sidneyhe Rebels usually economized their cartridges, firing only when they could do so with effect. Pillow, still successful and slowly advancing, about noon joined hands with Buckner in the center, and tly led by him against breastworks whereof the defense had doubtless been weakened to strengthen Pillow's effort, succeeded with little loss. The 2d Iowa went into them on a run, closely followed by followed by transports conveying part of Gen. Pope's army ; finding his way first impeded at Fort Pillow, or Wright, situated on the first Chickasaw Bluffs, near the Islands Nos. 33 and 34, about 70as our only vessel that had suffered, and she had but 4 wounded. A month later, June 4. Fort Pillow was evacuated, as was Fort Randolph, twelve miles below. Some damaged guns were left in them
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
anding Sidney Johnston advances from Corinth, Miss. assails Grant's front near Shiloh Church Sherman and McClernand driven Grant borne back Buell and Lew Wallace arrive the Rebels driven losses Halleck takes Corinth Mitchel repossesses Huntsville and most of North Alabama. the river Tennessee, taking rise in the rugged valleys of south-western Virginia, between the Alleghany and the Cumberland ranges of mountains, but drawing tribute also from western North Carolina and northern Georstage, had become its line of supply. Gen. O. M. Mitchel, with a division of Buell's army, had left Nashville simultaneously with his commander, but by a more easterly route, advancing through Murfreesboroa, Shelbyville, Fayetteville, to Huntsville, Ala., which he surprised at day-light, April 9. capturing 17 locomotives and a large number of passenger and freight-cars, beside a train which he had taken, with 159 prisoners, two hours before. Thus provided, he had uncontested possession o
Snake Creek (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
of Pittsburg Landing, with a front like a Methodist camp-meeting, straggling from Lick creek on the south or left, to Snake creek on the north or right, a distance of some three or four miles. Gen. Prentiss's division was encamped across the directnd, with its right near Pittsburg Landing and its front somewhat protected by the ravines of two rivulets running into Snake creek. Though the vicinity of the enemy was notorious, not an intrenchment nor defense of any kind, not even an abatis, hthat order, listening to the sound of the mutual cannonade since morning; and his column was instantly put in motion. Snake creek, with steep banks and swampy bottom, was in his way; but his men were eager for the fray, and were soon making good tild easily envelop him with thrice his numbers. He thereupon turned abruptly to the left, moving down the west bank of Snake creek to the river road, which follows the windings of the Tennessee bottom, and crosses the creek at its mouth, close by Pi
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
of Floyd and Pillow surrender by Buckner retreat of Sidney Johnston from the Cumberland across the Tennessee Nashville recovered Columbus, Ky. New Madrid Island no.10 Fort Pillow Memphis first siege of Vicksburg Grant moves up the Tennessee to Pittsburg Landing Sidney Johnston advances from Corinth, Miss. assails Grantf the Mississippi, had here been stretched across the great river, but to no purpose; the Missouri end being loose, and buried in tile mud of tie river-bed. Island No.10 lies in a sharp bend in the Mississippi, 45 miles below Columbus, and a few miles above New Madrid on the Missouri bank. This island had been strongly fortifiof his men, without damaging his batteries. He soon left for Corinth, April 5. ceding the command /un> at No. 10 to Map showing the relative positions of Island no.10, New Madrid, Tiptonville, etc. Brig.-Gen. Makall, who assumed it in a bombastic proclamation. Meantime, Gen. Pope's engineers were quietly engaged in cutt
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