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J. D. Fontaine (search for this): chapter 67
lso his reference to the energy displayed by First Lieutenant James Breathed, of the Stuart horse artillery. I am most of all indebted to First Lieut. D. A. Timberlake, Corporal Turner Doswell, and private J. A. Timberlake, Fourth Virginia cavalry, Second Lieut. James B. Christian, and private R. E. Fray, Third Virginia cavalry, who were ever in advance, and without whose thorough knowledge of the country and valuable assistance rendered, I could have effected nothing. Assistant -Surgeon J. D. Fontaine, Fourth Virginia cavalry, (the enemy giving him little to do in his profession,) was bold and indefatigable in reconnoissance, and was particularly active in his efforts to complete the brigade. Captain Heros Von Borcke, a Prussian cavalry officer, who lately ran the blockade, assigned me by the Honorable Sceretary of War, joined in the charge of the first squadron in gallant style, and subsequently by his energy, skill, and activity, won the praise and admiration of all. To my s
John Selden (search for this): chapter 67
s as their names were being registered. While the Yankees were being disposed of, an intelligent negro prisoner, named Selden, who belongs to Mr. Braxton Garlick, standing up in the wagon in which he had been brought to the city, entertained a larome on the approach of the enemy, who, until dislodged on Friday, have been in quiet possession of his premises. We give Selden's account: His business was that of a weaver, but the Yankees on their arrival, destroyed his loom and put him to work inrn out, and paid cash for it. The Yankees had not injured anything of Mr. Garlick's except the loom, but they had treated Selden, individually, very badly. They took all his eggs and wrung all his chickens' necks and eat them before his eyes, and wot home. They were afraid to go with the Yankees. Being interrogated as to the circumstance of his capture by our men, Selden said: About an hour by sun Friday evening, Mr. Clots, Moses and myself were at work in the mill. The Yankees were
J. H. Hammond (search for this): chapter 67
was the consternation produced by our march. An Assistant-Surgeon was also taken: he was en route, and not in charge of the sick. Upon arriving opposite Garlick's, I ordered a squadron from the Ninth Virginia cavalry to destroy whatever could be found at the landing on the Pamunkey. Two transports, loaded with stores, and a large number of wagons were here burnt, and the squadron rejoined the column with a number of prisoners, horses and mules. A squadron of the First Virginia cavalry (Hammond's) assisted in this destruction. A few picked men, including my aids, Burke, Farley and Mosley, were pushed forward rapidly to Tunstall's, to cut the wires, and secure the depot. Five companies of cavalry, escorting large wagon-trains, were in sight, and seemed at first disposed to dispute our progress, but the sight of our column, led by Lee, of the Ninth, boldly advancing to the combat, was enough. Content with a distant view, they fled, leaving their train in our hands. The party t
by his energy, skill, and activity, won the praise and admiration of all. To my staff present my thanks are especially due for the diligent performance of the duties assigned them. They were as follows: First Lieut. John Esten Cook, Ordnance Officer, (my principal staff-officer for the occasion,) First Lieut. C. Dabney, A. D.C., Rev. Mr. Landstreet, Capts. Farley, Towles, Fitzhugh, and Mosby rendered conspicuous and gallant service during the whole expedition. My escort, under Corporal Hagan, are entitled individually to my thanks for their zeal and devotion to duty, particularly privates Carson, of the Jeff Davis Legion, and Pierson, of the Fourth Virginia cavalry. Herewith are submitted the reports of subordinate commanders, marked A, B, and C, and a map, D, showing my route, and papers, E, containing recommendations for promotion, and F, containing congratulatory orders published to the command upon its return. I have the honor to be, General, your obedient servant,
uld turn out, and paid cash for it. The Yankees had not injured anything of Mr. Garlick's except the loom, but they had treated Selden, individually, very badly. They took all his eggs and wrung all his chickens' necks and eat them before his eyes, and would not give him a cent. All of his master's negroes were at home. They were afraid to go with the Yankees. Being interrogated as to the circumstance of his capture by our men, Selden said: About an hour by sun Friday evening, Mr. Clots, Moses and myself were at work in the mill. The Yankees were just eating supper. Some of them were in their tents, and some were sitting about under the trees. Suddenly I heard such a mighty hurrah out of doors that I thought heaven and earth had come together. Running to the door, I saw the Yankees running in every direction, and our men pursuing and catching them. One Yankee jumped into the Pamunkey and tried to swim across, but our men fired at him and he sunk directly. This was t
Thomas D. Clapp (search for this): chapter 67
ful charge against a superior force of the enemy. In announcing the signal success to the army, the General Commanding takes great pleasure in expressing his admiration of the courage and skill so conspicuously exhibited throughout by the General and the officers and the men under his command. In addition to the officers honorably mentioned in the report of the expedition, the conduct of the following privates has received the special commendation of their respective commanders: Private Thomas D. Clapp, Co. D, First Virginia cavalry, and J. S. Mosby, serving in the same regiment; privates Ashton, Brent, R. Herring, F. Herring, and F. Coleman, Co. E, Ninth Virginia cavalry. By command of General Lee, R. H. Chilton, A. A. G. Richmond Dispatch account. It being determined upon to penetrate the enemy's lines, and make a full and thorough reconnoissance of their position and strength, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart ordered the First, (Col. Fitz-Hugh Lee,) Ninth, (Col. F. H. Fitz-Hugh Lee
Frederick Harrison (search for this): chapter 67
ng after the occurrence, regiments of infantry were thrown along both sides of the railroad to act as a guard, while several companies of cavalry were despatched on scouting expeditions through the woods and surrounding country. Every effort was made by our men, who were enraged beyond measure, to capture the daring and desperate rebels. They have succeeded in capturing six of the rebels, among whom are Capt. Garlick, whose father lives at the landing where the rebels crossed the river; Dr. Harrison, a rampant secesh, who lives near this place, and whose property has been constantly guarded by Union soldiers since this place fell into our hands. It is said that he has been in constant communication with the rebels since their departure from Yorktown, and it is positively asserted that Gen. Stuart, who is supposed to have led this marauding band, and the rebel Lee, who formerly lived here, have, on more than one occasion, been guests at his house. There is no disguising the fact tha
nce as I did on this clear moonlight night, in a hostile country, with the enemy hovering around me, when the Fifty-second Pennsylvania stood there to defend me and others, unarmed and helpless like myself, from danger and death. The following are the casualties, so far as I have been able to learn, resulting from this wonderful raid of guerrillas: killed.--Three laborers, whose names I could not learn, supposed to be from Philadelphia, killed on the railroad train; D. Potter, a Quartermaster Sergeant, shot through the head at Garlick's Landing. wounded.--A private of the Nineteenth Massachusetts, name unknown; Anton Haneman, laborer; Lieut. John Brelsford, company I, Eighty-first Pennsylvania; William Bradley, company E, One Hundredth New-York; Robert Gilmore, drummer, Eighty-seventh New-York; a lieutenant, whose name I could not learn; Albert Barker, Twelfth New-York; Jesse P. Woodbury, belonging to one of the gunboats. Several others are reported, but these are all I have
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 67
ts were kept far to the right to ascertain the enemy's whereabouts, and advancedguard flankers and rear-guard to secure our column against surprise. I purposely directed my first day's march toward Louisa, so as to favor the idea of reenforcing Jackson, and camped just opposite Hanover Court-House, near Southanna Bridge, (Richmond, Fredericksburgh, and Potomac Railroad,) twenty-two miles from Richmond. Our noiseless bivouac was broken early next morning, and without flag or bugle sound, we rels in this war occurred on Friday evening last, a short distance from this place. It was another of those desperate efforts they have from time to time put forth to recover lost opportunity and atone for past defeats. The surprisal of Banks by Jackson, though of a more formidable and successful character, was not more complete, sudden, and unexpected than the one experienced in this department. A part, some say a whole regiment, of the First Virginia cavalry, under the command of Gen. Stew
William McLean (search for this): chapter 67
ees and sixteen negroes. We give the names of the officers, together with their rank and the place of their capture. They were all taken on Friday, the thirteenth instant; Capt. James Magrath, company G, of the Forty-second New-York, and Lieut. John Price, of the Forty-second New-York, were captured at Tunstall's station, on the York River Railroad; Lieut. H. B. Masters, of the Fifty-fifth New-York, at the White House; and Lieut. Charles B. Davis, Sixth United States regular cavalry, Lieut. Wm. McLean, company H, Fifth United States regular cavalry, and Assistant-Surgeon Adam Trau, Fifth United States regular cavalry, at Old Church, Hanover. There were about twenty regulars among the privates, the balance being members of the Forty-second New-York volunteers. The whole party, negroes and all, had been drenched to the chin by the heavy rain that had just fallen, and, shivering with cold, their teeth chattered in chorus as their names were being registered. While the Yankees were
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