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Browsing named entities in a specific section of James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). Search the whole document.

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Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
d their prowess. The first commander of the Benton was Lieutenant S. Ledyard Phelps. He fought the gunboat in both of the above engagements. The Benton was hit twenty-five times while supporting Sherman's unsuccessful assault on Vicksburg from the north, and she was Admiral Porter's flagship when he ran by the batteries at the beginning of the maneuver by which Grant approached and invested Vicksburg from the southward, thus accomplishing the fall of the key to the Mississippi. The Louisville, one of the original Eads ironclads U S. Gunboat Benton, tug Fern The Ellet rams. After the General Price became a Federal gunboat, the pilot-house was protected and moved forward and other alterations were made. The Ellet rams continued their useful work. Charles Rivers Ellet took the first vessel past the batteries at Vicksburg after Grant had determined upon his venturesome movement upon the city from the south. Admiral Farragut, who had come up from the Red River, reque
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
t several at one time, for one or two ships would fall an easy prey to their comparatively numerous steam frigates. But inequality of numbers may be compensated by invulnerability, and thus not only does economy, but naval success, dictate the wisdom and expediency of fighting with iron against wood, without regard to first cost. The suggestion here quoted was made two months before the above-mentioned paragraph in Secretary Welles' report The heyday of the monitor On the Appomattox River, in 1864, lie five of the then latest type of Federal ironclad-all built on the improved Ericsson plan, doing away with the objectionable overhang of the deck, dispensed with in order to give greater speed and seaworthiness. By this time the Federal navy had found abundant opportunity to try out the qualities of the monitor type. A monitor presented less than a third as much target area as any one of the old broadside ships that could possibly compete with her armament. Her movable t
Neosho, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ating monitor-turret of this ironclad and her great guns saved both herself and the transport Black Hawk from capture during the return of the Red River expedition. The Osage was a later addition to the squadron; she and her sister ironclad, the Neosho, were among the most powerful on the rivers. Porter took both with him up the Red River. On the return the Osage was making the descent with great difficulty, in tow of the Black Hawk, when on April 12th she ran aground opposite Blair's plantation. A Confederate force twelve hundred strong, under General Thomas Green, soon appeared on the west bank and, planting four field-pieces, advanced to attack the stranded ironclad. The brisk enfilading fire of the Lexington and the Neosho did not deter them. Lieutenant-Commander T. O. Selfridge waited till the heads of the Confederates appeared above the river bank. Then he let drive at them with his two big guns, pouring upon them a rain of grape, canister, and shrapnel. General Green, wh
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
trapped vessels to get free above the Falls at Alexandria, in the Red River expedition. Porter pronounced her turret all right but considerend the transport Black Hawk from capture during the return of the Red River expedition. The Osage was a later addition to the squadron; she he most powerful on the rivers. Porter took both with him up the Red River. On the return the Osage was making the descent with great diffisissippi. In May, 1863, she was with Admiral Porter on the first Red River expedition and distinguished herself in the action with Fort Beauregard. The next year she was in the second Red River expedition and shared with the other vessels the dangers of the return. She was one o city from the south. Admiral Farragut, who had come up from the Red River, requested General Alfred W. Ellet to let him have two of the ramleet to run the batteries in order to augment the blockade of the Red River. On March 25, 1863, Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Ellet, in command o
Grand Gulf (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
le vessel, whose consorts were all drifting out of action in a disabled condition. It was only by great coolness and courage that the Carondelet was extricated after being exposed to a terrific fire for some time. The Pittsburg was conspicuous in the fight with the Confederate flotilla at Fort Pillow. She was sent by Admiral Porter on the famous land cruise up the Yazoo, which nearly cost him the flotilla. She ran the batteries at Vicksburg and helped to silence the batteries at Grand Gulf, Mississippi. In May, 1863, she was with Admiral Porter on the first Red River expedition and distinguished herself in the action with Fort Beauregard. The next year she was in the second Red River expedition and shared with the other vessels the dangers of the return. She was one of the most serviceable of the first Eads ironclads. The Cincinnati, a salvaged gunboat The Cincinnati was one of the first seven Eads ironclads to be built and was the second to meet disaster. She was Foote
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
had a crew of 92 men. Her first engagement was with Battery Dantzler in the James River, Nov. 29, 1864. In December, 1864, and January, 1865, the Mahopac was in the first line of the ironclads that bombarded Fort Fisher. Her men declared that she silenced every gun on the sea-face of that fort. The Mahopac on active service The monitor Mahopac. You will hoist your flag on the Virginia, or any other vessel of your squadron, which will, for the present, embrace the Virginia, Patrick Henry, Jamestown, Teaser, Raleigh, and Beaufort. The Virginia is a novelty in naval construction, is untried, and her powers unknown, and the department will not give specific orders as to her attack upon the enemy. Her powers as a ram are regarded as very formidable, and it is hoped that you may be able to test them. Like the bayonet charge of infantry, this mode of attack, while the most destructive, will commend itself to you in the present scarcity of ammunition. It is one, also, t
Onondaga, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
h turret masked a considerable angle of fire of the other. The Saugus, together with the Tecumseh and Canonicus and the Onondaga, served in the six-hour action with Battery Dantzler and the Confederate vessels in the James River, June 21, 1864. Agathe beginning of the last year of the war. The latest type of iron sea-elephant in 1864: the double-turreted monitor Onondaga After having steadily planned and built monitors of increasing efficiency during the war, the Navy Department finally turned its attention to the production of a double-turreted ocean cruiser of this type. The Onondaga was one of the first to be completed. In the picture she is seen lying in the James River. There, near Howlett's, she had steamed into her firstvessels engaging Battery Dantzler, the ram Virginia, and the other Confederate vessels that were guarding Richmond. The Onondaga continued to participate in the closing operations of the navy on the James. Of this class of double-turreted monitors
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
was with Battery Dantzler in the James River, Nov. 29, 1864. In December, 1864, and January, 1865, the Mahopac was in the first line of the ironclads that bombarded Fort Fisher. Her men declared that she silenced every gun on the sea-face of that fort. The Mahopac on active service The monitor Mahopac. You will hoist your flag on the Virginia, or any other vessel of your squadron, which will, for the present, embrace the Virginia, Patrick Henry, Jamestown, Teaser, Raleigh, and Beaufort. The Virginia is a novelty in naval construction, is untried, and her powers unknown, and the department will not give specific orders as to her attack upon the enemy. Her powers as a ram are regarded as very formidable, and it is hoped that you may be able to test them. Like the bayonet charge of infantry, this mode of attack, while the most destructive, will commend itself to you in the present scarcity of ammunition. It is one, also, that may be rendered destructive at night agai
Island Number Ten (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
in the engagement she was struck thirty-one times. Two of her guns and one of her paddle-wheels were disabled, and her smokestacks, after-cabin, and boats were riddled with shot. She was soon in commission again and joined the flotilla above Island No.10. In the sudden attack by which the Confederate gunboats surprised the Federal squadron above Fort Pillow, the Cincinnati again met disaster and was towed to shallow water, where she sank. Again she was repaired in time to take part in the bowere slow, she proved to be the most powerful fighting vessel in the Federal Mississippi squadron. She held that distinction till late in 1864, when the river monitors began to appear. The Benton was Foote's flagship in the operations around Island No.10; and when the gallant old officer retired, it was on her deck that he bade good-bye to his officers and men. The Benton then became the flagship of Captain Charles Henry Davis, who in her directed the famous battle off Memphis where the Ellet
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
n epoch in naval warfare Under the date of July 4, 1861, the Secretary of the Navy of the United States, the Honorable Gideon Welles, in his report, explained very clearly the exact position of th the age of eleven. In 1839, with several notable inventions already to his credit, he came to America and laid before the Navy Department his new arrangement of the steam machinery in warships. Itordnance had increased in power, penetration, and efficiency. All that was lacking in the United States up to the year 1861 was a demand, or an excuse, for experiment along the lines of progress ir of the first necessity. Such a vessel at this time could traverse the entire coast of the United States, prevent all blockade, and encounter, with a fair prospect of success, their entire navy. Iate navy. All of these gentlemen were officers who had seen long service in the navy of the United States. In a letter from Mallory, addressed to Flag-Officer Forrest, Porter and Williamson are men
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