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Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ch, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI. Strong guards will be left at the railway bridge between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportion from the commands at Iuka, Beirnsville, and Corinth. VII. Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field. Corps commanders will determine the strength of these guards. VIII. Wharton's regiment of Texas cavalry will be ordered forward, at once, to scout on the road from Monterey to Savannah, between Mickey's and its intersection with the Pittsburg-Purdy road. It will annoy and harass any force of the enemy moving, by the latter way, to assail Cheatham's division at Purdy. IX. The Chief-Engineers of the forces will take due measures and precautions, and give all requisite orders, for the repair of the bridges, causeways, and roads, on which our troops may move, in the execution of these
Scalabis (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 20
ese circumstances, and for the further reason that the enemy, being on the alert, Buell's junction would no doubt be hastened, he was no longer in favor of making the attack, but favored inviting one by turning this offensive movement into a reconnoissance in force, to draw the enemy after us nearer to our base—Corinth—and thereby detach him further from his own, at Pittsburg Landing. Somewhat similar strategy had been resorted to by Wellington in 1810, when, advancing to attack Massena at Santarem, he unexpectedly found that able officer on his guard, ready for battle, on ground of his own choosing, and much stronger than he had anticipated. After making some demonstrations in front of his wily adversary, to draw him away from his stronghold, Wellington did not hesitate to retire without giving battle. General Beauregard's views produced a visible effect on all present. General Johnston, although shaken, after some reflection said that he admitted the weight and force of Genera
Shiloh, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
March, and to the probability of Buell's Junction, and advises to change aggressive movement into a reconnoissance in force. General Johnston decides otherwise, and orders preparations for an attack at dawn next day. description of the field of Shiloh. strength of the Federal forces. what General Sherman testified to. we form into three lines of battle. our effective strength. carelessness and oversight of the Federal commanders. they are not aroused by the many sounds in their front, anshould be made for an attack at dawn, next day. Thus ended this memorable conference; the officers who had been present at it repairing to their respective headquarters, in good spirits and hopeful for the morrow. A description of the field of Shiloh may be appropriate, to enable the reader more readily to understand an account of that battle. The sketch of the country furnished by General Jordan, Adjutant-General of the Confederate forces, in his Campaigns of General Forrest, is so correct
Bark (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
le, on the Ridge road from Corinth, to what is known as the Bark road, passing about half a mile northward of the workhouse.nt surprise, will halt in front of the Mickey house, on the Bark road. 2. Major Waddell, A. D. C. to General Beauregard, ps, with the left in front, will continue to advance by the Bark road until within sight of the enemy's outposts or advancedte vicinity of Mickey's house, at the intersection with the Bark road, before sunset. The cavalry with this wing will tak to reach, by night, the intersection of that road with the Bark road. This wing will continue the movement in the morning,se it will be halted in column or massed on the line of the Bark road, according to the nature of the ground, as a reserve. resting on or about the intersection of that road with the Bark road, having advanced guards and pickets in the direction o the First Corps, at the intersection of that road with the Bark road leading from Corinth. IV. The reserve of the force
Holly Springs (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
armies: If I join this corps to the forces of Beauregard (I confess, a hazardous experiment), then, those who are now declaiming against me will be without an argument. Soon after General Johnston's arrival, and in the course of his first conference with General Beauregard, he expressed, with evident emotion, his purpose to turn over to the latter the direct command of our united forces, and to confine his own functions to those of Department Commander, with headquarters at Memphis or Holly Springs. He alleged, as his reason for wishing to do so, that such a course would be best for the success of our cause; that he had lost, in no small degree, the confidence of the people, and somewhat, he feared, of the army itself, in consequence of recent disasters; while he felt sure that General Beauregard, who held the confidence of both, was better fitted to cope with present difficulties and dangers, and fulfil, successfully, public expectation. General Beauregard, in a spirit of disint
J. M. Hawes (search for this): chapter 20
ier-General Breckinridge, who had succeeded General Crittenden. IV. The brigades of each army corps and of the reserve will be so formed as to consist severally of about two thousand five hundred total infantry, and one light battery of six pieces, if practicable. V. Divisions shall consist of not less than two brigades and one regiment of cavalry. VI. All cavalry and artillery not hereinbefore assigned to divisions and brigades will be held in reserve: the cavalry under Brigadier-General Hawes, the artillery under an officer to be subsequently announced. VII. All general orders touching matters of organization, discipline, and conduct of the troops, published by General G. T. Beauregard to the Army of the Mississippi, will continue in force in the whole army until otherwise directed, and copies thereof will be furnished to the Third Army Corps and the reserve. VIII. Major-General Braxton Bragg, in addition to his duties as commander of the Second Army Corps, is ann
A. Lincoln (search for this): chapter 20
stated, under oath, at the trial of Colonel Worthington, that they amounted to fortythree thousand men, exclusive, be it remembered, of Lew. Wallace's division of about eight thousand men, on the northwest side of Owl Creek. He then supposed our force was sixty thousand strong, instead of its actual number—forty thousand three hundred and thirty-five men of all arms and conditions. But it may be fair to infer that he judged of their number by the effect they produced. Thus it was that Mr. Lincoln was sorely puzzled during the war at his commanding generals reporting constantly that they had fought the Rebels with inferior numbers. In the instance of the battle of Shiloh, this phenomenon might, however, possibly have happened; for in about thirty days, with our defective means of transportation, we had collected at Corinth, from Murfreesboroa, Pensacola, Mobile, New Orleans, and other distant points, an effective force of over forty thousand men of all arms, while the Federals had
David Urquhart (search for this): chapter 20
auregard, on the morning of the 3d of April, 1862, to General A. S. Johnston, who accepted the same without modification in a single particular. Thomas Jordan, Brig.-Gen. and A. A. G. The following passage is taken from a statement of Colonel D. Urquhart, of General Bragg's staff, addressed to General Jordan. It confirms, as the reader will see, all that precedes: Narragansett, R. I., August 25th, 1880. My dear General,—I am in receipt of your letter of—, and in reply have to saff, he should issue all orders without the formula of being submitted and approved by General Johnston, except, of course, such an order as that of directing the offensive. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Yours truly, David Urquhart. To General Thomas Jordan, New York. At the hour prescribed in the preparatory circular to the corps commanders, which had been sent out that morning—viz., about ten o'clock—the troops were all under arms in Corinth, apparently ready fo
e impending battle, when called to the field of combat, will move by the Griersford road. A regiment of the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V. General Bragg will detail the 51st and 52d regiments Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama and Desha's Arkansas battalion, and Bairn's battery, from his corps, which, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI. Strong guards will be left at the railway bridge between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportion from the commands at Iuka, Beirnsville, and Corinth. VII. Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field. Corps comma
passing through Griersford, on Lick Creek. The cavalry will throw well forward advanced guards and videttes towards Griersford and in the direction of Hamburg, and during the impending battle, when called to the field of combat, will move by the Griersford road. A regiment of the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V. General Bragg will detail the 51st and 52d regiments Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama and Desha's Arkansas battalion, and Bairn's battery, from his corps, which, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI. Strong guards will be left at the railway bridge between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due
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