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Gregory Stone (search for this): chapter 17
wooden fence built, which in turn was taken away, and in 1893 the present substantial iron fence erected on Massachusetts Avenue, Garden Street, and the northerly boundary. This God's Acre, as it is often called, contains the dust of many of the most eminent persons in Massachusetts: the early ministers of the town, Shepard, Mitchel, Oakes, Appleton, Hilliard, and others; early presidents of Harvard College, Dunster, Chauncy, Willard; the first settlers and proprietors, Simon Stone, Deacon Gregory Stone, Roger Harlakenden, John Bridge, Stephen Daye, Elijah Corlett; and, later, the Lees, the Danas, Allstons, and Wares. It is much to be regretted that so many graves remain unmarked, and equally so that the names of tenants of many costly tombs are unknown by the very imperfect registration, or want of registration, in the town records. Some tombs of once prominent families, who have become extinct, were built on a level with the sod, and as no name or mark whatever is to be seen, are
Thomas Shepard (search for this): chapter 17
therly boundary. This God's Acre, as it is often called, contains the dust of many of the most eminent persons in Massachusetts: the early ministers of the town, Shepard, Mitchel, Oakes, Appleton, Hilliard, and others; early presidents of Harvard College, Dunster, Chauncy, Willard; the first settlers and proprietors, Simon Stone, of Cambridge should add an honor to its semicenten-nial this year by erecting a simple monument or tablet near that of Jonathan Mitchel, in commemoration of Rev. Thomas Shepard, who died August 25, 1649. He made it possible for Cambridge to be honorably known everywhere as the University City. An eye-witness and historian of his n these grounds, and not far from where we are now standing, the first Christian proprietor of this soil, Simon Stone, a companion in faith and tribulation of our Shepard, and one of the noble band of Puritans, who first established the Church of God in this Town, built his dwelling, and planted trees which yet bear their fruit. T
Andrew Boardman (search for this): chapter 17
The College Records read: Whereas there is a good stone wall erected round the Burying Place in Cambridge, and whereas there has been a regard to the College in building so good and handsome a wall in the front, and the College has used, and expects to make use of the Burying Place, as Providence gives occasion for it, therefore, Voted, that as soon as the said wall shall be completed, the Treasurer pay the sum of £ 25 to the Committee of the Town, Samuel Danforth, William Brattle, and Andrew Boardman, Esquires. This wall was removed some forty years since, and a wooden fence built, which in turn was taken away, and in 1893 the present substantial iron fence erected on Massachusetts Avenue, Garden Street, and the northerly boundary. This God's Acre, as it is often called, contains the dust of many of the most eminent persons in Massachusetts: the early ministers of the town, Shepard, Mitchel, Oakes, Appleton, Hilliard, and others; early presidents of Harvard College, Dunster, Cha
Anson Burlingame (search for this): chapter 17
low, who died in 1882. On Central Avenue, near the gateway, is the bronze statue, sitting, of Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch. On High Cedar Hill stands a beautiful marble temple; beneath which rest the remains of Hon. Samuel Appleton. Others eminent in public life rest here in this sacred soil:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phillips Brooks. President Josiah Quincy.James Russell Lowell. John G. Palfrey.Rev. A. Holmes, D. D. President Sparks.Oliver Wendell Holmes. Robert C. Winthrop. On Gentian Path is a beautiful granite obelisk, erected by Thomas Dowse, on which is inscribed— To the memory of Benjamin Franklin, the printer, the philosopher, the statesman, the patriot, who by his wisdom blessed his country, and his age, and bequeathed to the world an illustrious example of industry, integrity
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 17
level surface, running through the grounds, called Indian Ridge, is the sarcophagus of Gaspar Spurzheim, the celebrated phrenologist; he died in 1832. Farther on is that of the poet Longfellow, who died in 1882. On Central Avenue, near the gateway, is the bronze statue, sitting, of Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch. On High Cedar Hill stands a beautiful marble temple; beneath which rest the remains of Hon. Samuel Appleton. Others eminent in public life rest here in this sacred soil:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phillips Brooks. President Josiah Quincy.James Russell Lowell. John G. Palfrey.Rev. A. Holmes, D. D. President Sparks.Oliver Wendell Holmes. Robert C. Winthrop. On Gentian Path is a beautiful granite obelisk, erected by Thomas Dowse, on which is inscribed— To the memory of Benjamin Fr
Jabez Wyman (search for this): chapter 17
e known, as it always should have been, as the day of the battle of Lexington, Concord, and Cambridge. More men were killed and wounded within the then limits of Cambridge than in all the other towns. With the names on the monument Dr. McKenzie also suggested adding the prophetic vision of Samuel Adams, Oh! what a glorious morning is this! The full inscription is: Erected by the city, A. D. 1870 to the memory of John Hicks,—William Marcy,—Moses Richardson, buried here. Jason Russell,—Jabez Wyman,—Jason Winship, buried in Menotomy. men of Cambridge, who fell in defence of the liberty of the people, April 19th, 1775. Oh! what a glorious morning is this! In searching in 1870, to find the place of burial preparatory to erecting this monument, excavations were made along the northerly line of the grounds, and several skulls were found with bullet holes, showing where some of our killed at Bunker Hill were buried; but the grave of Colonel Thomas Gardner, a prominent citizen of C
Rufus Choate (search for this): chapter 17
, running through the grounds, called Indian Ridge, is the sarcophagus of Gaspar Spurzheim, the celebrated phrenologist; he died in 1832. Farther on is that of the poet Longfellow, who died in 1882. On Central Avenue, near the gateway, is the bronze statue, sitting, of Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch. On High Cedar Hill stands a beautiful marble temple; beneath which rest the remains of Hon. Samuel Appleton. Others eminent in public life rest here in this sacred soil:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phillips Brooks. President Josiah Quincy.James Russell Lowell. John G. Palfrey.Rev. A. Holmes, D. D. President Sparks.Oliver Wendell Holmes. Robert C. Winthrop. On Gentian Path is a beautiful granite obelisk, erected by Thomas Dowse, on which is inscribed— To the memory of Benjamin Franklin, the pr
Henry Vassall (search for this): chapter 17
een broken out and lost, and only a blank aperture remains. This was caused largely by the scarcity of lead in the Revolution, when the lead in which the tablets were embedded was removed for bullet-making, at the same time that the old church building near by was desecrated. The Judge Trowbridge tomb, near the gateway, has been substantially indicated within a few years. Inclosed therein is the commingled dust of very eminent families for several generations. Near this is the prominent Vassall monument, with the figures of a vase and the sun, the armorial bearings of the family. Near by is the ancient mutilated milestone, first placed near the Old Court House, in the present Harvard Square, in 1734, on which is cut 8 miles to Boston, the above date, and the initials A. I., of him who cut and first placed it. This directed travelers the way to Boston through Roxbury, over the only bridge that then crossed Charles River, to Little Cambridge, now Brighton. The above initials are
Joseph Warren (search for this): chapter 17
ho fell in defence of the liberty of the people, April 19th, 1775. Oh! what a glorious morning is this! In searching in 1870, to find the place of burial preparatory to erecting this monument, excavations were made along the northerly line of the grounds, and several skulls were found with bullet holes, showing where some of our killed at Bunker Hill were buried; but the grave of Colonel Thomas Gardner, a prominent citizen of Cambridge, a member of the Congress at Watertown with General Joseph Warren, is unknown. He was mortally wounded at Bunker Hill. The first official order of General Washington here, July 4, 1775, was for full military honors at his funeral that day. Near this locality is the grave of John Hughes, a young man who died and was buried among strangers. The inscription on the headstone reads: Beneath this tomb rests the remains of Mr. John Hughes, of Norwich in Connecticut. He died in his country's cause, July ye 25th, A. D. 1775, in ye 21st year of his
Emory Washburn (search for this): chapter 17
Farther on is that of the poet Longfellow, who died in 1882. On Central Avenue, near the gateway, is the bronze statue, sitting, of Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch. On High Cedar Hill stands a beautiful marble temple; beneath which rest the remains of Hon. Samuel Appleton. Others eminent in public life rest here in this sacred soil:— Charles Sumner.Rufus Choate. Louis Agassiz.Rev. Wm. Ellery Channing. President C. C. Felton.Edwin Booth. Gov. Edward Everett.Charlotte Cushman. Gov. Emory Washburn.Joseph E. Worcester. Anson Burlingame.Bishop Phillips Brooks. President Josiah Quincy.James Russell Lowell. John G. Palfrey.Rev. A. Holmes, D. D. President Sparks.Oliver Wendell Holmes. Robert C. Winthrop. On Gentian Path is a beautiful granite obelisk, erected by Thomas Dowse, on which is inscribed— To the memory of Benjamin Franklin, the printer, the philosopher, the statesman, the patriot, who by his wisdom blessed his country, and his age, and bequeathed to the world an i
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