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Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
g his troops preparatory to the coming struggle at Sharpsburg. In the action at South Mountain, known in Southern history as the battle of Boonsborough, the 23rd Regiment bore a prominent part, and it was in this fight that General Garland, the brigade commander, was killed. It is well to recur to the report of this battle, as furnished by General D. H. Hill to the Century Magazine of May, 1886, for facts and observations, we quote: In the retirement of Lee's army from Frederick to Hagerstown and Boonsborough, my division constituted the rear-guard. It consisted of five brigades (Wise's brigade being left behind), and after the arrival at Boonsborough, was intrusted with guarding the wagon-trains and packs of artillery belonging to the whole army. It was to save Lee's trains and artillery that the battle was fought, and not to prevent the advance of McClellan, as was believed in the North from an exaggerated idea about the number of Confederates engaged. General Hill says
Taylorsville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
ee among the captured and missing. Among the wounded and captured of the 23rd was Captain H. G. Turner, of Co. H, since the war a distinguished member of Congress from Georgia. He is a native of Granville, and brother of Adjutant Vines E. Turner. It is well authenticated that only one officer and not exceeding twenty men of the regiment escaped death, wounding or capture. It was about the 7th of May, 1864, that the brigade, after a season of recreation in the vicinity of Hanover and Taylorsville, received orders to rejoin the army at the Wilderness, near Spotsylvania Court House. General Grant was now in command on the other side. The regiment had a part in the battle of the Wilderness. Brigadier-General Johnston joined his command on the Rappahannock just before the battle of Mine Run, and participated in that fight, although the brigade was not actively engaged, as it was a mere skirmish. The brigade reached the army, from Hanover, just before the battle of the Wildernes
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
The 23rd North Carolina Infantry. [from the Raleigh, N. C., news and observer, April 11, 1897.] Organized in 1861, as the 13th regiment of Volunteers. Historical Sketch of by H. C. Wall. Upon the secession of North Carolina, May 20, 1861, the convention passed an ordinance authorizing the raising and equipping of ten regiments of infantry, to be designated State Troops, the said regiments to be numbered from one to ten, inclusive, in the order of their organization, the enlistment in the same to be made for and during the war. Subsequently the raising of other regiments, as volunteers for the term of twelve months, was authorized, these to be, in like manner, numbered from one up, in the order of their organization. This distinction between State Troops and volunteers was kept up until the re-organization under the general Conscript Act, which went into effect on the 17th of May, 1862, when the order of numbering the regiment was changed by adding the volunteer regiment, as
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
and while around Fredericksburg, General Rodes commanded the division. At Chancellorsville the regiment was on the extreme left, and was conspicuous in turning the enemy's right and accomplishing Hooker's defeat. Its loss was heavy at Chancellorsville. Its Major, C. C. Blacknall, was wounded here, and fell into the hands of the in time to return to the army before Gettysburg. The loss in the 23d at Chancellorsville was officially reported by General Rodes, as 173 killed, wounded and missitles already referred to, which friends have furnished us, particularly of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg; but it is probably well to have left that to the more geneettysburg. It was somewhat now like it was when the fight first opened at Chancellorsville, barring the fact that the regiment did not number so many men. It entered the fight at Chancellorsville in first-rate trim, numbering somewhere between 300 and 400 men, rank and file. It lost good officers there in the death of Captains K
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
s army thus enabling Jackson to march to the Virginia side and capture Harper's Ferry, while Lee was conducting his troops preparatory to the coming struggle at Sharpsburg. In the action at South Mountain, known in Southern history as the battle of Boonsborough, the 23rd Regiment bore a prominent part, and it was in this fight th was the consequence. No explanation was ever known for the mistake, ruse or whatever it was. The loss of the regiment in the two battles of South Mountain and Sharpsburg was about 45 privates and non-commissioned officers wounded and 15 or 20 killed; and of commissioned officers from 3 to 6 wounded; none killed. Assistant Surgeuch as to elicit from General Garland words of highest praise for his regiment and himself, a few minutes before the general received his mortal wound. After Sharpsburg, and when the army had recrossed the Potomac, Colonel Christie was ordered by General D. H. Hill to take command of Brigadier-General Anderson's Brigade, the la
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
ent of transferring his troops by the way of the Potomac and Chesapeake Bay to Yorktown, anticipating an easy victory over the small army of Magruder, and then on to and his resolve to reinforce Magruder and take command of the entire force at Yorktown. With the other commands the regiment reached Yorktown on the 8th of April, ‘Yorktown on the 8th of April, ‘62, a stop having been made on the south side of the Rappahannock of several weeks duration, to await the full development of McClellan's plans. At Yorktown, the tryYorktown, the trying duty of service in the trenches began. On the 17th, after nine days behind the breastworks, the boys had their first experience with cannon balls and bombshells. were not informed of it. He was killed at Gettysburg. The term of service at Yorktown was not at all irksome, nor was it unmarked by occasional diversion from the ttter destruction and death over all the land. On the night of the 3d of May Yorktown was evacuated. Twelve miles out in the suburbs of the ancient town of William
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
athe the prayer that here may America's second revolution, as did the first, have an ending. But, alas! even then, as if in derision of prophecy and hope, there hung upon the horizon a cloud—not yet comparatively bigger than a man's hand, but which was destined to increase in proportions and intensity, and ere long to burst and scatter destruction and death over all the land. On the night of the 3d of May Yorktown was evacuated. Twelve miles out in the suburbs of the ancient town of Williamsburg the battle of the 5th of May occurred, rendered necessary by the too eager pursuit of the enemy. From a point on the road several miles beyond the town towards Richmond, Early's Brigade—now composed of the 5th and 23d North Carolina, the 24th Virginia and the 2d Florida Battalion—was ordered back to aid Longstreet in resisting the furious attack. At the moment of our reaching the field the bloody drama was going on in full view of the town. Much was said at the time and afterwards of <
Monocacy River (United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
onclusion: There were 45,000 infantry and 10,000 cavalry in the open fields against 8,500 infantry and 3,000 mounted gun-men. The thing began at daylight and kept on until dark, when flanked and worn out, Early retreated, to escape being surrounded. This is the story (given only in part here) of the thin grey line of North Carolina and the cavalry charge, a feat of arms before which that of Sir Colin Campbell fades into insignificance. The brigade had a severe fight at the Monocacy river, near Frederick City, in entering Maryland. Captain W. C. Wall, commanding Company F, was severely wounded in this fight. While General Gordon's Division crossed the river and attacked the line of battle in the flank, Johnston's Brigade was ordered to capture a blockhouse on the other side of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. A considerable number of the enemy were in the railroad cut and perfectly protected. The brigade charged across the railroad on the bridge, under a raking fire fr
Brandy Station (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
was then almost without a field officer, refused longer to serve under Iverson, and Lieutenant-Colonel R. D. Johnston was made Brigadier-General. Iverson was removed and Lieutenant-Colonel Robert D. Johnston, of Lincoln county, N. C., was placed in command of the brigade, the division being commanded by Rodes. Gettysburg had proved to be the lion in the path of General Lee's march into the enemy's country, and he soon fell back into Virginia. In operations at Vidiersville, and near Brandy Station in the fall of 1863, the regiment sustained loss, but not heavy. In barracks, at Hanover, during the winter of 1863 and 1864, the regiment may be said to have had a really good time, as did the entire brigade. So at the opening of the campaign in 1864, the regiment and entire brigade appeared well recruited for duty, well equipped and in good fighting trim generally. Governor Vance, in a speech to the army, said the boys looked like they had corn to sell. This remark of Governor Vanc
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1.16
mand at that battle, although it exhibited the nerve and endurance of a host. Its Adjutant, Junius French, was killed there, and among the killed also was Wm. H. Johnston, Captain of Co. K, while the roster places the killed of privates and non-commissioned officers at about fifty-five, and eighty-nine wounded, and fifty-three among the captured and missing. Among the wounded and captured of the 23rd was Captain H. G. Turner, of Co. H, since the war a distinguished member of Congress from Georgia. He is a native of Granville, and brother of Adjutant Vines E. Turner. It is well authenticated that only one officer and not exceeding twenty men of the regiment escaped death, wounding or capture. It was about the 7th of May, 1864, that the brigade, after a season of recreation in the vicinity of Hanover and Taylorsville, received orders to rejoin the army at the Wilderness, near Spotsylvania Court House. General Grant was now in command on the other side. The regiment had a part
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