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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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G. W. Smith (search for this): chapter 1.23
64 is correct. Otherwise his description from the Federal standpoint is in accord with my recollection. As this was a bloody and remarkable battle, and no account of it has been written for several years, you will, I hope, allow me to give the Confederate version of the battle. Even the Federal official reports have been strangely reticent concering the operations of the 18th of June, 1864, and of the two days preceding that day. General Grant, in his report, says that he ordered General G. W. Smith to advance, and for three days finding no progress had been made, he went himself to the front. This is all he says; General B. F. Butler, who had been bottled up, as Grant said, across the Appomattox, a stone's throw from a part of this battlefield, and who crossed it to see Grant, retaliated the bottling up assertion by alleging that Grant was drunk on this occasion. Some time ago a new element to me, was introduced into our Confederate version, and I wrote to General Hagood the
R. H. Nelson (search for this): chapter 1.23
the Charles City dirt road were the 11th, 21st, 27th and 25th regiments. Between the dirt road and railroad was a fort, and to the east of the railroad was another fort. These forts were held by the 7th battalion, under Major James H. Rion. Colonel Nelson was absent, and did not return until the 19th. He was killed five days afterwards, on nearly the same field. From Rion's forts to Colquitt's salient there was a short gap. The forts were somewhat nearer to the Federal lines than the salientet pits; he directed they should be kept at a good distance from our main line, so that the main line might not be annoyed by shooting from close quarters. This was wise. When we first entered the canal our regiments were mixed up, but soon Colonel Nelson came in, and our battalion was aligned from the road eastwardly, and the other regiments extended to Colquitt's salient in the same direction; to the west of the road was Clingman's North Carolina Brigade. They did not keep the Federals off
Dave Walton (search for this): chapter 1.23
ed to the dirt road, and bring up the pioneers. The Federals were sending their shells down the railroad as down a sluice. But the pony carried me safely, and I soon had the pioneers at the front. When I reported with them, Lieutenant Hill was temporarily absent, and General Hagood turned the pioneers over to me to build the bridge. A veteran soldier can do almost anything, and soon I raised a cloud of dust which drew afresh the shelling of the Federals. About this time some of Captain Dave Walton's company came in from the front, and said one of Wise's abandoned cannon and limber chest were at the foot of the hill in front, about sixty yards away. The General gave me leave to stop raising the dust, and to take the pioneers and recover the gun. We brought it back into the road, alongside of the left fort, wheeled it round, and got it ready for the next charge of the Federals. The General said when we put it in position, that we had no artillerists to manage it. I told him som
Barton Haxall Wise (search for this): chapter 1.23
he banks of the Appomattox, to the Colquitt salient, the Confederate lines were there held by General Wise's Virginia brigade and the Virginia reserves. The Federals came across the James river and advanced on Petersburg by the Charles City roads. They swept across Wise's lines, leaving no Confederate position occupied except that of the Virginia battery at the Appomattox. From that point to Coe and up the Main street we marched, my blackness illuming and leading the way. It was just after Wise's brigade had given way. They were running back, some hatless, some shoeless, and nearly all withhe picket line in the gray of the morning, there could be seen Federal pickets approaching two of Wise's abandoned forts in our front, as if to take possession of them. The forts were as near to us a About this time some of Captain Dave Walton's company came in from the front, and said one of Wise's abandoned cannon and limber chest were at the foot of the hill in front, about sixty yards away
tt's salient there was a short gap. The forts were somewhat nearer to the Federal lines than the salient, but when on the 19th the forts were abandoned and new lines established south of Hare's Race Course, in the old canal, then the gap was closed and Colquitt's salient became nearer the Federal lines. Beyond Colquitt's salient to the east the lines ran to the salient, variously called Pegram's (who occupied it on the 18th of June), Elliott's (who there fought the mine fight in August) and Gracie's (who held it after the mine fight). None of these, however, were engaged on the 18th of June. The attack of the Federals commenced on the 16th. From the Virginia battery, on the banks of the Appomattox, to the Colquitt salient, the Confederate lines were there held by General Wise's Virginia brigade and the Virginia reserves. The Federals came across the James river and advanced on Petersburg by the Charles City roads. They swept across Wise's lines, leaving no Confederate position o
ient on the lines held by Colquitt's brigade. Hagood's, Colquitt's and Clingman's brigades compriseival of reinforcements of Hagood's brigade. Hagood's brigade had been on the north side of the Jaey went down on their knees on the pavements. Hagood's brigade had saved them twice recently befor kept up all that day. Early in the day General Hagood came to us, and made his headquarters on tat there might be access along our lines. General Hagood's staff was scattered, and I can recall no as Mr. Alley testifies. About the time General Hagood came to us and was endeavoring to establis battalion back to the canal and report to General Hagood. This I did, looking back at Major Rion tBoth sides retreated. I had reported to General Hagood in the road, and he directed me to take hi the second company of the Light Infantry. General Hagood gave me a verbal order on the commanding o My remembrance is that Captain Martin, of General Hagood's staff, was wounded in the same vicinity [7 more...]
Jordan H. Martin (search for this): chapter 1.23
body would see I was a gentleman and give me decent burial. A few days after I had been among the tadpoles, as above related, I went to the rear, towards the Appomattox, to bathe and wash my clothing. I found, I thought, a safe place, and deposited my studs on a stump, taking my shirt with me into the water. While busy in my laundry the Federals made an attack, and their balls fell so thick around me that I retreated, taking my clothing, regardless of my studs. My remembrance is that Captain Martin, of General Hagood's staff, was wounded in the same vicinity that day. So when I went North for my health in 1868, and passed through Petersburg, I stopped over to see the old battlefield and find my studs. I found the stump, but the studs were gone. The old forts were reversed. Instead of facing North they faced South. Some negro women and a man were hoeing corn on the site of the left fort. I asked them if that was a Yankee or Rebel fort? He Yankee fort, was the answer. I was
Dwight Stoney (search for this): chapter 1.23
our dirt road and the 25th regiment was a deep drain, and it became necessary to bridge this drain in order that there might be access along our lines. General Hagood's staff was scattered, and I can recall none who were with him except Lieutenant Dwight Stoney, a glorious little soldier then, and now in the Charleston express office. The General made use of me, and among other things, he intimated he wanted that bridge built. I informed him our battalion pioneer corps, under Lieutenant Hill, of Company C, was back at Hares's Race Course. He directed me take Dwight Stoney's pretty marsh tacky, with a good switch, ride fast as I crossed the railroad where it converged to the dirt road, and bring up the pioneers. The Federals were sending their shells down the railroad as down a sluice. But the pony carried me safely, and I soon had the pioneers at the front. When I reported with them, Lieutenant Hill was temporarily absent, and General Hagood turned the pioneers over to me to b
Ward Hopkin (search for this): chapter 1.23
y for the next charge of the Federals. The General said when we put it in position, that we had no artillerists to manage it. I told him some of Rion's old company B, were among the pioneers and were drilled in artillery practice. All right, go ahead. This was the only gun used that day or the next, so far as I know, on our lines, and it did good service, as Mr. Alley testifies. About the time General Hagood came to us and was endeavoring to establish the line down to the river, Captain Ward Hopkin's, Captain Walters', and perhaps some other companies, were marched to the front and towards the river, across the open field. I was standing on the parapet of the fort watching them. The Federals trained their guns upon them, and I saw these brave soldiers killed. Along with them were Lieutenant Allemong and Sergeant Beckman. I knew them all well. Ward Hopkins was a classmate with me in the South Carolina College, and no more knightly spirit ever served the Confederacy. Beckman
Marcus B. Alley (search for this): chapter 1.23
gade. To the Editor of the Sunday News. In your issue of Sunday, the 18th July, Mr. Marcus B. Alley, of the Maine Artillery during the late war between the States, gives a history of the Fele have been meagre, and that a Confederate statement should supplement the Federal account of Mr. Alley. Hagood's Brigade. The Confederate lines attacked at that time were held by Hagood's Sounly gun used that day or the next, so far as I know, on our lines, and it did good service, as Mr. Alley testifies. About the time General Hagood came to us and was endeavoring to establish the limfortable all night in my wet and muddy clothing. The next morning was the 18th June. Then Mr. Alley says, Lincoln's pets, 1,950 strong, the Maine battery, charged us, and went back with 250. I think to myself, Will he never say fire? At length they came within ten or fifteen yards, as Mr. Alley says, and the Major straightened himself, Rear rank, ready! aim, fire! Then, Front rank, rea
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