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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
. This reverie of a visionary he desired to apply to all the conquered countries, to Acadia and Canada on the north; and to the two Floridas on the south, which were to be divided into great baronies 27 September. 1768. Representation of the Lords of Trade to the King, 5 October, 1763. For Canada, or the province of Quebec, as it was called, the narrower boundaries, on which Shelburne had inr, he bore a letter of the nature of a proclamation, informing the inhabitants of the cession of Canada to England; another, addressed to twenty-five nations by name, to all the Red Men, and particulaatedly allowed by successive ministries in France, of all the papers relating to the conquest of Canada, or to Montcalm. The fabrication and sale of political papers and secrets was, in the last cent which American independence at an early day was predicted as the consequence of the conquest of Canada. Lord Mansfield, who believed the letters genuine, Debate in the house of Lords. was persuad
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
o the Mississippi valley was entered at Pittsburg, on the New River, and on the Holston and Clinch. It was only Florida, the new conquest, accepted in exchange for Havana, that civilized men left as a desert. When, in July, possession of it was taken, the whole number of its inhabitants, of every age and sex, men, wives, children, and servants, was three thousand, and of these the men were almost all in the pay of the Catholic King. Lt.-Col. Robertson's Report of up to the year 1796. Knoxville, the State of E. and W. Florida, 115. The possession of it had cost Spain nearly two hundred and thirty thousand dollars annually; and now Spain, as a compen- chap. IX.} 1763. Oct. sation for Havana, made over to England the territory which occasioned this fruitless expense. Most of the people, receiving from the Spanish treasury indemnity for their losses, migrated to Cuba, taking with them the bones of their saints and the ashes of their distinguished dead; leaving, at St. Augustine,
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
efiance of reiterated royal mandates, Virginian adventurers outgrew all limits of territorial parishes, and seated themselves on the New River, near the Ohio, in the forbidden valley of the Mississippi; and not even the terrors of border chap IX.} 1763. Oct. wars with the savages could stop the enthusiasm of running backwards to hunt for fresh lands, Fauquier to the Lords of Trade. in men who loved no enjoyment like that of perfect persona] freedom in the companionship of nature. From Carolina the hunters John Heywood's Civil and Political History of the State of Tennessee, from its earliest settlement 1823, page 35. Compare also, page 74. annually passed the Cumberland Gap, gave names to the streams and rocky ridges of Tennessee, and with joyous confidence chased game in the basin of the Cumberland river. On all the waters, from the Holston river to the head springs of the Kentucky and the Cumberland, there dwelt not one single human inhabitant. It was the waste forest and
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ages dispersed to their hunting grounds. Nothing could restrain the Americans from peopling the wilderness. To be a freeholder was the ruling passion of the New England man. Marriages were early and very fruitful. The sons, as they grew up, skilled in the use of the axe and the rifle, would, one after another, move from the ol, 53. so that the broken and mowburnt rice might be sold as food for negroes, and good rice made cheaper for the British market. The boon that was to mollify New England was concerted with Israel Mauduit, acting for his brother; the agent of Massachusetts, and was nothing less than the whale fishery. Jasper Mauduit, the Agentificers, and to three thousand seamen, Regulations lately made, &c., 49-51. was resigned to America. The gain would, in the first instance, be the gain of New England, but the mother country, reasoned chap. IX.} 1764. April. Grenville, feels herself benefited by the welfare of every particular colony; and the colonies must
Louisa (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
iberty and legislative independence. The crime of which Henry is guilty, wrote one of the clergy, is little, if any, inferior to that which brought Simon Lord Lovat to the block. For the vindication of the king's injured honor and authority, they urged the punishment of the young Virginian, and a list was furnished of witnesses against him. But Patrick Henry knew not fear; nor did his success conquer his aversion to the old black letter of the law books. Though he removed to the county of Louisa, in quest of business, he loved the green wood better even than before, and would hunt deer for days together, taking his only rest under the trees; and as he strolled through the forest, with his ever ready musket in his hand, his serene mind was ripening for duty, he knew not how, by silent communion with nature. The movement in Virginia was directed against 1764, Jan. the prerogative. Vague rumors prevailed of new commercial and fiscal regulations, to be made by act of parliament;
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 9
the men were almost all in the pay of the Catholic King. Lt.-Col. Robertson's Report of up to the year 1796. Knoxville, the State of E. and W. Florida, 115. The possession of it had cost Spain nearly two hundred and thirty thousand dollars annually; and now Spain, as a compen- chap. IX.} 1763. Oct. sation for Havana, made over to England the territory which occasioned this fruitless expense. Most of the people, receiving from the Spanish treasury indemnity for their losses, migrated to Cuba, taking with them the bones of their saints and the ashes of their distinguished dead; leaving, at St. Augustine, their houses of stone, in that climate imperishable, without occupants, and not so much as a grave tenanted. The western province of Florida extended west and north to the Mississippi, in the latitude of thirty-one degrees. On the twentieth of October the French surrendered the post of Mobile, with its brick fort, Gayarre. which was fast crumbling to ruins. A month later t
Massachusetts Bay (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
the colonies was endangered. Further: Grenville had been made to believe that the Americans were able to contribute to the revenue, and he had little reason to think them so stubborn as to refuse the payment of a tax. There was not the least disposition in the agents of the colonies to oppose it; J. Mauduit, 11 February, 1764. and the agent of Massachusetts made a merit of his submission. Jasper Mauduit's letter to the Speaker of the louse of Representatives of the province of Massachusetts Bay. London, 11 Feb. 1764. The Secretary of Maryland had for years watched the ripening of the chap. IX.} 1764. Mar. measure, and could not conceal his joy at its adoption. Calvert to Sharpe, in many leters. Thomas Pownall, the fribble, Samuel Adams's opinion of Thomas Pownall. who had been Governor of Massachusetts, and is remembered as one who grew more and more liberal as he grew old, openly contended for an American revenue to be raised by customs on trade, a stamp-duty, a mod
Cavendish (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
r domestic government. Nor did he contribute to confer paramount authority on the military officers in America. Pownall's Administration of the Colonies. Second Edition, 69, and compare the edition of 1776, i. 101. Grenville's speeches in Cavendish, for April, 1770. On the contrary, he desired to keep the army subordinate to the law. He did not, indeed, insist that his colleagues should yield to his opinions, but, in parliament and elsewhere, he refrained from favoring the system which wo conscience easily condemned opinions which thwarted his ambition. Besides; as a thorough whig, he regarded the parliament of England as chap. IX.} 1764. Mar. in all cases supreme; he knew no other law, no other rule. George Grenville, in Cavendish i. 496. The later reports of the military commanders Letters of Amherst and his subordinates. in America, accused the colonies of reluctance to furnish the men and money which the commanderin-chief had required. Calvert to Lieutenant-
West Indies (search for this): chapter 9
object of their care. All officers, both civil, and military, and naval, in America and the West Indies, were to give their cooperation. We depend, said a memorial from the chap. IX.} 1763. Oct.tenants, Campbell, 7. and would owe their landlord a large annual rental. In the small West India islands, an agrarian law set bounds to the cupidity for land. Egmont, the new head of the admiral ruins. A month later the Nov. slight stockade at Tombecbe, Florida, in America, and the West Indies, CXXXIV. Gayarre, II. 108. in the west of the Choctaw country, was delivered up. In all thisrectly to any part of America, to the southward of those colonies; that is, to the foreign West India islands; 4 Geo. III. c. XXVII. Regulations, &c. 52, 53. so that the broken and mowburnt rice ty, will be collected by the fewest officers, and will be equally spread over America and the West Indies. Israel Mauduit, in Mass. Hist. Collections, IX. 270. What ought particularly to recommen
Cape Florida (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
fectual suppression of contraband trade. Halifax to the Commander-in-chief of his Majesty's Forces in to Egremont, 25 October, 1763. S. P. O. Am. and W. I. vol. LXXVII. Nor was there delay in following up the new law to employ the navy to enforce the Navigation Acts. To this end Admiral Colville, Admiral Colville to Lieutenant Governor of New-York. Bernard North America, 11 October, 1763. the naval Commander-in-chief on the coasts of North America, from the river St. Lawrence to Cape Florida and the Bahama Islands, became the head of a new corps of revenue officers. Each captain of his squadron had customhouse commissions and a set of instructions from the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty for his guidance; and other instructions were given them by the Admiral to enter the harbors or lie off the coasts of America; to qualify themselves by taking the usual custom-house oaths to do the office of customhouse officers; to seize such persons as were suspected chap. IX.} 1763
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