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ns to Portsmouth, and then left at leisure. The enemy in Arkansas. The Memphis Avalanche, of the 10th inst., has the following editorial news relative to the movements of the enemy in Arkansas: A gentleman just from Newtown, Arkansas, states that the Federals had about 4,000 troops at Pocahontas, and about 5,000 more under General Curtis, were daily expected. The Federals were overrunning Arkansas, and it was reported that large bodies were moving on Little Rock and Jacksonport — They had not reached the latter place 1st Saturday. The Federals approaching, Little Rock are said to be accompanied by Lane, of Kansas, whom they design to make Governor of Arkansas, in place of Governor Rector. The Federals at Pocahontas had taken possession of the Gazette and Herold office, and from it were issuing a paper devoted to local matters and the affair of the Federal troops. The editor of the Pocahontas. Herold and Gazette Capt. Martin, is raising a guerrillas brigade.
ns to Portsmouth, and then left at leisure. The enemy in Arkansas. The Memphis Avalanche, of the 10th inst., has the following editorial news relative to the movements of the enemy in Arkansas: A gentleman just from Newtown, Arkansas, states that the Federals had about 4,000 troops at Pocahontas, and about 5,000 more under General Curtis, were daily expected. The Federals were overrunning Arkansas, and it was reported that large bodies were moving on Little Rock and Jacksonport — They had not reached the latter place 1st Saturday. The Federals approaching, Little Rock are said to be accompanied by Lane, of Kansas, whom they design to make Governor of Arkansas, in place of Governor Rector. The Federals at Pocahontas had taken possession of the Gazette and Herold office, and from it were issuing a paper devoted to local matters and the affair of the Federal troops. The editor of the Pocahontas. Herold and Gazette Capt. Martin, is raising a guerrillas brigade.
ened, and nut in a condition to delay the Federal flotillas a long time, if indeed they do not impede them altogether. No doubt Butler and Fariagut, who have scarcely regained their composure amid the exciting scenes incident to the capture of the Crescent City, are nursing the hope that no obstruction will be presented to their immediate movement up the river to Memphis, and thence to Fort Pillow, which they hope to see fall or evacuated, as the result of a combined attack of their own and Foote's gunboat fleet. We do not question the propriety of this movement on the part of our authorities. Indeed, it can be regarded in no other light than as being eminently wise. Should it only contest the enemy's control of the Mississippi river for sixty days and prevent a union of the Federal columns now at New Orleans and New Madrid that length of time, it will do much good. By the time Butler and his forces have been in the "land of cotton," particularly within the vicinity of New Or
Beauregard (search for this): article 26
w of whom were captured in spite of their fleetness.--Some of them say that 40,000 men were massed together in an entrenched camp behind Seven Miles Creek, about a mile and a half back at Farmington. These troops had ample time to come to the assistance of Gen. Pope possibly flalleck thought we would follow a across the creek, where he would have great the advantage; or, it may be, he was not ready for the decisive battle, and therefore remained quietly in his camp. Be this as it may, Gen. Beauregard offered him battle upon a faithful open field, and he declined to accept it. And he was not ready, then he acted wisely; if he was, and still declined the offer, then he must distrust his ability to cope with us upon equal terms. The loss was slight on both sides, on account of the character of the engagement. Fifty will probably cover the number of our killed and wounded, and two hundred that of on enemy. We captured a telegraph office suit considerable amount of baggage and case
ded in large numbers at Smithfield. The nearness of Smithfield to James river offers facilities for the landing of the enemy which we could not prevent. It is stated that they have also appeared at Chuckatuck, Nassemond county, in large force. Burnsided reported to be making his way slowly towards Murfreesboro', N. C., and other positions in the vicinity of the Seaboard railroad. If these reports be correct, the indications point very plainly to an attempted junction of the forces under Burnside and McClellan, and then a grand movement towards Richmond on the south side of James river. The Express also makes the following allusion to a rumor which prevailed to some extent in Richmond on Saturday last: We understand that a most terrific rumor prevailed in Richmond on Saturday, relative to Petersburg. Some re(lie)able person appeared in the streets of the former city, almost out of breath and scarcely able to articulate for the time; yet managed to gain forth to his hear
s gallantly in the recent fight in Giles county. The letter from which we copy is dated Wolf Gap, May 13th: The fight in Giles county. The great desire of my life has at last been realized — that of being in a battle. Last Friday night Gen. Heth, with 1,500 infantry, our two guns, one 24 pound howitzer, 4 mountain howitzers, and a company of cavalry, started from Shannon Gap, at 10 o'clock at night, to attack the enemy at Giles Court-House, a small village of 300 or 400 inhabitants. hrowing shells and shot into their ranks for half an hour, when the cowardly dogs, finding our fire too hot for them, commenced retreating. We pursued them for six miles, until we reached Wolf Gap, where we now are. Wolf Gap is the place where Gen. Heth wanted to make a stand in defence of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, as it is the great pass to that road. It would have done your very soul good, as it did mine, to see the "Otey boys" throw shell into them, when the cowardly Yankees fle
he great pass to that road. It would have done your very soul good, as it did mine, to see the "Otey boys" throw shell into them, when the cowardly Yankees fled like sheep. Our men fought well and gallantly, and I don't think that we will ever surrender as long as Captain Otey leads us on to battle. The people of Giles Court-House said the enemy carried off ten wagon loads of killed and wounded early in the retreat. Our loss was very small--one man killed and four wounded. Col. Patton, of the 22d Virginia regiment, fell wounded while gallantly loading his regiment in charge. None of our battery was hurt. We captured four prisoners, fifty horses, and a lot of arms, ammunition, and stores. Onslow. Official report of the engagement at Drury's Bluff The following is Captain Farrand's official report of the action last week at Drury's Bluff: Drury's Bluff, May 15, 1862. Hon. S. R. Mellory, Secretary of the Navy: Sir: The enemy came up the river at
tails of the affair which could not fall to interest your readers if I fell at liberty to give them. Suffice it to say, we came near capturing the greater part of Pope's army. Two hours more and the thing would have been done. Three guns were fired in succession by the Confederates about 9 o'clock the night before, which seem te unable to get within range of his flying columns. Indeed, it was a running fight from the moment the Federals learned we had attacked them in force. Possibly Gen. Pope had orders to retire in the event he was attacked, since one can hardly conceive how 20,000 fresh troops in position could fail to offer a stubborn resistance toed together in an entrenched camp behind Seven Miles Creek, about a mile and a half back at Farmington. These troops had ample time to come to the assistance of Gen. Pope possibly flalleck thought we would follow a across the creek, where he would have great the advantage; or, it may be, he was not ready for the decisive battle, a
Charles Moore (search for this): article 26
ge and along the river is now a mass of smouldering fire. All the sugar, too, has either been carried to a place of security or destroyed. Our informant did not visit the arsenal and armory and other Confederate buildings, and therefore cannot speak positively on the point, but his impression is that all the Government stores, machinery, ammunition, &c., have either been removed or left in such a condition as to be valueless to the enemy. Immediately upon his arrival at the Capital, Gov. Moore issued a proclamation announcing the great disaster to our arms, and counselling the people in patriotic language as to their duty in this their hour of adversity. The Governor does not attempt to depreciate the enemy's success, but at the same time he calls upon all citizens of the State to do all in their power to render that success as fruitless and as short lived as possible. With this view, he enjoins the destruction of cotton, sugar, and other property liable to seizure and appropr
umbers at Smithfield. The nearness of Smithfield to James river offers facilities for the landing of the enemy which we could not prevent. It is stated that they have also appeared at Chuckatuck, Nassemond county, in large force. Burnsided reported to be making his way slowly towards Murfreesboro', N. C., and other positions in the vicinity of the Seaboard railroad. If these reports be correct, the indications point very plainly to an attempted junction of the forces under Burnside and McClellan, and then a grand movement towards Richmond on the south side of James river. The Express also makes the following allusion to a rumor which prevailed to some extent in Richmond on Saturday last: We understand that a most terrific rumor prevailed in Richmond on Saturday, relative to Petersburg. Some re(lie)able person appeared in the streets of the former city, almost out of breath and scarcely able to articulate for the time; yet managed to gain forth to his hearers, that 20,
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