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Nathaniel Appleton (search for this): chapter 7
perintendent and later president (1679). In 1717 came to the church Rev. Nathaniel Appleton, interesting as one who fell on stirring times. At his installatione second granted by Harvard, the first being that given to Increase Mather. Dr. Appleton's pastorate lasted sixty years. Under him General Washington often worshippe 1775, the Second Provincial Congress met, adjourning to Concord on the 16th. Appleton's portrait, by Copley, hangs in Memorial Hall. In 1756 the Fourth Church of tlege, and in it, too, was given the address of welcome to Lafayette, 1824. In Appleton's time Christ Church was built. Then, of course, he lost his Church-of-Englanften worshipped with his men at the Congregational meeting house (then under Dr. Appleton), when Mrs. Washington came, Dec. 31, 1775, had Christ Church re-opened for o Jonathan Mitchell, Nathaniel Gookin, William Brattle, Thomas Hilliard, and Mr. Appleton; and of the Harvard presidents, Dunster, Chauncy (on whose tomb is a Latin
t-affecting, soul-ravishing preacher. Next to Shepard came Mitchel, almost equally celebrated for piety and eloquence. Cotton Mather and Richard Baxter praise him highly, and President Increase Mather said to his students, Say, each of you, Mitchel shall be the example whom I will imitate. During this pastorate, Dunster was convicted of Anabaptist views and was compelled to resign in 1654. In 1671 Uriah Oakes came over from England to be pastor. After the enforced resignation of President Hoar of Harvard, Oakes was appointed superintendent and later president (1679). In 1717 came to the church Rev. Nathaniel Appleton, interesting as one who fell on stirring times. At his installation Cotton and Increase Mather took part. His degree of D. D., was the second granted by Harvard, the first being that given to Increase Mather. Dr. Appleton's pastorate lasted sixty years. Under him General Washington often worshipped. In his church met the delegates from the towns of the s
William Marcy (search for this): chapter 7
Dunster, Chauncy (on whose tomb is a Latin inscription), Oakes, Leverett, Wadsworth, Holyoke, Willard and Webber. Here are also Governor Belcher, Judge Remington, Mrs. Brattle; and under Christ Church is the old Vassall tomb, containing ten coffins-those of the family and also one of the black servants of the family, and one probably of Lieutenant Brown, the English officer who was shot by a sentry. In the yard stands a monument erected to the memory of Mr. Hicks, Moses Richardson and William Marcy, who fell April 19,at Lexington. An interesting bit of the graveyard's history is that here, in July, 1775, the tombs were reft of their metal coats-of-arms, from which bullets were made. It is natural to turn from Christ Church to a brief mention of the dwellings of its first parishioners. The old Watertown Road once ran up what are now Mason and Brattle streets. On Brattle street were the stately residences occupied by men to whose staunch loyalty to England was due the name of
Waterhouse (search for this): chapter 7
een too rudely broken to be soon mended. Beside this particular group of houses, there are others whose history is also interesting. Of these one is the old Waterhouse mansion, on Waterhouse street. It was owned and occupied before the Revolution by William Vassall. Here are preserved relics of the famous Dr. Waterhouse, who Dr. Waterhouse, who was one of the first to introduce vaccination into America. In token of this fact, the family preserve a clock, surmounted by a golden cow. Another relic is an old clock presented in 1790 to Dr. Waterhouse by Peter Oliver, chief Justice of the province. It is wound at Christmas and on the fourth of July. Another interesting hDr. Waterhouse by Peter Oliver, chief Justice of the province. It is wound at Christmas and on the fourth of July. Another interesting house is the old Hicks House, at the corner of Dunster and Winthrop streets. It is chiefly interesting as the home of the patriot, John Hicks, who aided in the Boston tea-party, December 16, 1773. He was killed in the Concord fight, and his is one of the six names on the monument in the old burying-ground. The glass door is stil
Grizzel Apthorp (search for this): chapter 7
es Chapell in N. England-1694. Mr. Batchelder, who gives these facts about the service, adds also that it is used only on especial occasions. There is another silver service and one of gold (the Foote memorial). The silver basin given by Mrs. Grizzel Apthorp is used as the chief alms basin. A silver service given in 1791 by Mrs. Bethune, (laughter of Benjamin Faneuil, is used for communion-alms. The original parchment parish-register dating back to 1759 is preserved by the church. Betweenchusetts avenue, and stands well back, with its side to the street. A path leads up to it, between old borders of fragrant box. This house was built about 1761 by the Rev. East Apthorp, first rector of Christ Church. When the Puritans feared Mr. Apthorp was aspiring to a bishopric in this country, he was forced by popular feeling to return to England. The house was next occupied by John Borland, a merchant, who lived there until the Revolution. Then General Putnam took it for the headquarte
William Palfrey (search for this): chapter 7
ame, Dec. 31, 1775, had Christ Church re-opened for a service which he attended. One is still shown the place where his hat was laid, near the threshold. General and Mrs. Washington probably occupied Robert Temple's pew, third from the front, on the left wall, now the slip opposite the sixth pillar from the door, says Mr. Batchelder. A queer little uncomfortable wooden pew is shown you, if you climb to the belfry, and is said to be the very one in which the general sat. That day Col. William Palfrey read service, and gave a form of prayer which he had written in place of the one for the king. In June, 1777, when British and Hessian troops were quartered here, after Burgoyne's capitulation, Lieut. Richard Brown of the Seventy-first English regiment was shot by a sentry. He was buried under Christ Church, probably in the Vassall tomb, and it was on this day that the church was most defaced by vandals. After this the church was a mere ruin, the people were scattered, their ve
Benjamin Faneuil (search for this): chapter 7
fine organ, made John Snetzler of London, a bell weighing over fifteen hundred pounds, a silver christening basin from the rector's mother, a folio Bible from Mrs. Faneuil, and two folio prayerbooks from Mr. Lechmere, were the chief gifts. Of these all but the organ and bell are now preserved and can be seen. The organ was brokfirst members were Tories later, and their houses, on Brattle street, were known as Tory Row or Church Row. Besides these Tory Row people, Richard Lechmere, Benjamin Faneuil (brother of Peter), James and Thomas Apthorp (brothers of East), Madame Temple and her son Robert, Brig- adier-General Isaac Royal, the Skiltons and Sweethoote memorial). The silver basin given by Mrs. Grizzel Apthorp is used as the chief alms basin. A silver service given in 1791 by Mrs. Bethune, (laughter of Benjamin Faneuil, is used for communion-alms. The original parchment parish-register dating back to 1759 is preserved by the church. Between Christ Church and the First P
on nearly the present site of Dane Hall at Harvard Square. In this same year, before the church was completed, Mr. Shepard died. We have the record of him as the holy, heavenly, sweet-affecting, soul-ravishing preacher. Next to Shepard came Mitchel, almost equally celebrated for piety and eloquence. Cotton Mather and Richard Baxter praise him highly, and President Increase Mather said to his students, Say, each of you, Mitchel shall be the example whom I will imitate. During this pastoraMitchel shall be the example whom I will imitate. During this pastorate, Dunster was convicted of Anabaptist views and was compelled to resign in 1654. In 1671 Uriah Oakes came over from England to be pastor. After the enforced resignation of President Hoar of Harvard, Oakes was appointed superintendent and later president (1679). In 1717 came to the church Rev. Nathaniel Appleton, interesting as one who fell on stirring times. At his installation Cotton and Increase Mather took part. His degree of D. D., was the second granted by Harvard, the first
Thomas Apthorp (search for this): chapter 7
e, said. All but one or two of these first members were Tories later, and their houses, on Brattle street, were known as Tory Row or Church Row. Besides these Tory Row people, Richard Lechmere, Benjamin Faneuil (brother of Peter), James and Thomas Apthorp (brothers of East), Madame Temple and her son Robert, Brig- adier-General Isaac Royal, the Skiltons and Sweethens of Woburn, and Robert Nichells of Billerica, all went to Christ Church. At 10 Linden street was the old rectory. It had hand-painted wall paper and Delft tiles, and was so grand it was called the Bishop's palace. Indeed, so did the Puritan people in the town dread lest Dr. Apthorp aspire to be bishop that they fairly drove him, by opposition, back to England in 1764. The next important period of the church's history was the Revolution time during which Christ Church was beaten upon by the waves of a wild tide of patriotism. The rector was forced to fly and had but a troubled life of it thereafter. In the sum
Lafayette (search for this): chapter 7
n Hancock, met, and it continued to meet here until its dissolution, December 10. Here the Committee of Safety held its first meeting, November 2, and here, on February I, 1775, the Second Provincial Congress met, adjourning to Concord on the 16th. Appleton's portrait, by Copley, hangs in Memorial Hall. In 1756 the Fourth Church of the Society was built. In it, for over seventy years, were held the public commencements of the college, and in it, too, was given the address of welcome to Lafayette, 1824. In Appleton's time Christ Church was built. Then, of course, he lost his Church-of-England parishioners. In 1792 Abiel Holmes began his long pastorate. During his time, in 1814, the college first held separate religious services. It was in Dr. Holmes' pastorate that the important separation came, from which sprung the First Parish (Unitarian) Church. Unitarianism had begun, practically, in King's Chapel, Boston, under the teaching of Clark. The people there had given up the
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