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Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ed all their lands outside certain prescribed limits. In 1810, when war was impending between the United States and Great Britain, the emissaries of the latter power induced a hundred or a hundred and fifty Sacs to visit the British agent on the island of St. Joseph, in Lake Huron, where they received arms, ammunition, and other presents, and most probably made engagements to adhere to the British cause in the event of war. In 1811, however, another deputation from the tribe visited Washington City, and offered their services in the impending war, but were requested by the President to remain neutral. In 1812 they again offered to assist the Americans, but were told to stay peaceably at home, to which command the greater part of the tribe reluctantly submitted. About two hundred of the more restless braves, eager for blood and plunder, joined the British, and shared in the military operations on the northwestern frontier. In this contingent, known as the British band, was Bl
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
, Pottawattamies, Sioux, Menomonees, and Sacs and Foxes, about 8,000,000 acres, extending from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi River. At this treaty, Keokuk and Morgan, with about two hundred Sac warriors, were present and forwarded the negotiatiokuk and all the tribe, except the band under Black Hawk at the Rock Island village, removed to the west bank of the Mississippi River; but these Indians remained deaf to the advice of the agents and the solicitations of Keokuk. The Government, assue Indians of the Rock Island village to comply with the treaty of 1829, surrender the disputed lands, and cross the Mississippi River. Black Hawk and his party denied the binding force of the treaties to which he himself had assented, and also the Four Lakes, now the site of the flourishing town of Madison, Wisconsin, and to be about to move westward for the Mississippi River. The line of march of the volunteers to Fort Winnebago left the Four Lakes to the right ; and, therefore, in going
South Dakota (South Dakota, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
settled at Green Bay, where their weakness compelled them to unite, so as to form one people with only a nominal distinction between its two members. After the destruction of the Illinois, the Sacs and Foxes took possession of their most desirable hunting-grounds, and occupied the country on both sides of the Mississippi, from the present southern boundary of Iowa to the present northern boundary of Illinois, with their most populous village at Rock Island. Other tribes of Algonquin or Dakota descent-Chippewas, Ottawas, Pottawattamies, Kickapoos, Menomonees, and Winnebagoes, Winnebago is a term of reproach, signifying Dirty-water-people; they call themselves Hochongalas, or Trout tribe. pressed upon the eastern and northern limits of the hunting-grounds of the Sacs and Foxes; while the Sioux, a powerful nation of fierce and skillful horsemen, flanked them on the west and northwest. In 1779 the Sacs and Foxes, with their allies, attacked St. Louis, then a village of less tha
St. Louis (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Other tribes of Algonquin or Dakota descent-Chippewas, Ottawas, Pottawattamies, Kickapoos, Menomonees, and Winnebagoes, Winnebago is a term of reproach, signifying Dirty-water-people; they call themselves Hochongalas, or Trout tribe. pressed upon the eastern and northern limits of the hunting-grounds of the Sacs and Foxes; while the Sioux, a powerful nation of fierce and skillful horsemen, flanked them on the west and northwest. In 1779 the Sacs and Foxes, with their allies, attacked St. Louis, then a village of less than five hundred people; and, encouraged by the treachery of the commandant of the Spanish garrison, would have destroyed it, but for the gallant defense of the French inhabitants and its timely relief by George Rogers Clark with an American force. After this, the Sacs and Foxes were engaged in wars with the Osages and other tribes, but especially with the Sioux, against whom they waged a deadly feud. Nevertheless they were prosperous, and a leading tribe in n
White Cloud (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
etween his own people and the whites aroused his fierce passions; and enforced peace galled his unquiet soul like a fetter. In the gloom of his seclusion, superstition stirred his wrath to frenzy ; and, as he saw the shadows of the dead summoning him to vengeance upon the race that had dispossessed them of the land, he brooded over vast schemes that should rival the conspiracies of Pontiac and Tecumseh. In these projects he was encouraged by the counsels of the Prophet Wabokieshiek, or White Cloud, a chief of mixed Sac and Winnebago blood, who had a village on Rock River, and possessed a wide influence among the Indian tribes. This savage charlatan, who combined great cunning with a love of intrigue, was the evil genius of Black Hawk, and lent the sanction of his omens and auguries to attempts which had no other assurance of success. Black Hawk advocated a hostile policy, in opposition to the pacific course of Keokuk, because he was thus enabled to divide the suffrages of the
Jefferson Barracks (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Fort Armstrong at Rock Island, and the companies of the Sixth Regiment at Jefferson Barracks, amounting in all to about 420 men. April 8th.-In obedience to the above-ix companies of the Sixth Infantry (220 men), which were embarked at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, in the steamboats Enterprise and Chieftain. April 10th.-Arrived at cers to points where they were required. Lieutenant Johnston was sent to Jefferson Barracks, where, during his absence, his eldest daughter, Henrietta Preston, had bspectfully, your obedient servant, Lewis Cass. To General H. Atkinson, Jefferson Barracks, Mo. The favorable opinions of the President, General Jackson, and of Gth generosity by the Government. They were retained in mild captivity at Jefferson Barracks long enough to break their power and destroy their prestige with their trormed the writer that Black Hawk told him, while he was in his custody at Jefferson Barracks, that he crossed the Mississippi to join the Prophet; that his engagement
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
uld be spared from the slender force at Prairie du Chien, the troops at Fort Winnebago at the portage of the Fox and Wisconsin Rivers and Fort Armstrong at Rock Island, and the companies of the Sixth Regiment at Jefferson Barracks, amounting in all trtook them on July 21, 1832, and successfully engaged them at what was known as Wisconsin Heights, a crossing of the Wisconsin River, twenty miles below Fort Winnebago. A letter from Mrs. Johnston to her mother gives the following account of thehusband: Generals Dodge and Henry, with their mounted men, overtook the retreating Indians at a point on the Wisconsin River fifteen miles above Blue Mounds. The Indians rose the crest of a hill on horseback, set up a yell, and fired, when eir only food. On the 25th, the regulars, with Alexander's and Henry's brigades, moved to within three miles of the Wisconsin River. In Mrs. Johnston's letter, already quoted, occurs the following: We got letters again last night, dated t
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
h, however small in perspective, shook the United States with excitement at the time, it will be nen 1810, when war was impending between the United States and Great Britain, the emissaries of the l, was Black Hawk. In September, 1815, the United States commissioners made a treaty with the frieniam Clark, Indian Agent, purchased for the United States all the lands claimed by this tribe in Missional agreement made the year before, the United States commissioners bought from the deputies of agreeing to submit to the authority of the United States, and to remain on the west side of the Misar previous, by the Sacs and Foxes and the United States. The troops had to be disembarked and hitesides, marched for Dixon's Ferry. The United States and Illinois infantry moved by water to thken up by the Indians in alliance with the United States so eagerly that it is believed that not on or taken prisoners and surrendered to the United States authorities. Among those thus given up wa[2 more...]
Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
eight or nine miles up Rock River, with 500 warriors. The council was then adjourned to the 19th of April. General Atkinson then proceeded up the river, and made arrangements with the commander at Prairie du Chien, and with General Dodge at Galena, relative to the protection of their districts, and the prevention of hostilities by the Menomonees and Sioux against the friendly Sacs and Foxes. On his return to Fort Armstrong, General Atkinson again met the friendly Sacs and Foxes on the campaign. Three brigades were organized at the Rapids of the Illinois, under the command of Generals Posey, Alexander, and Henry; but it was not until the 25th of June that they were able to move from Dixon's Ferry. General Posey marched toward Galena, to cooperate with General Dodge. General Alexander was detached in the direction of the Plum River, to cut off the retreat of the enemy, who were reported to be marching toward the Mississippi. The rest of the command, under General Brady, Unit
Sioux City (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
noted for martial prowess and inhuman cruelty. In a great war, said to have originated in the murder of the Sac chieftain, Pontiac, the Illinois tribes were overthrown and nearly exterminated by a rival confederacy, composed of Sacs and Foxes, Sioux, Kickapoos, Chippewas, Ottawas, and Pottawattamies, from the North, and Cherokees and Choctaws from the South. This overthrow occurred between 1767 and 1780; and in 1826 a miserable remnant of less than five hundred souls was all that was left oates all the lands claimed by this tribe in Missouri. In July, 1829, in furtherance of a provisional agreement made the year before, the United States commissioners bought from the deputies of the Winnebagoes, Chippewas, Ottawas, Pottawattamies, Sioux, Menomonees, and Sacs and Foxes, about 8,000,000 acres, extending from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi River. At this treaty, Keokuk and Morgan, with about two hundred Sac warriors, were present and forwarded the negotiation. While such had
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