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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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Lovettsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
e a total of ten thousand, but certainly not more. He was ably seconded by Generals Ewell and Ashby, and no three men in the Confederacy knew the country better. Although their force was small, and that of the enemy large, they unexpectedly appeared and disappeared like phantoms before Banks and Shields, acting like Jack-o‘--lanterns to draw them on to destruction. Our position on the Upper Potomac at Leesburgh was also threatened at not less than four points, namely, westward, from Lovettsville and Harper's Ferry; northward, from Point of Rocks; eastward, from Edwards's Ferry; and our rear from Drainsville. It was thought by some that our movement would be directly westward into the Shenandoah, to Jackson, distant thirty miles; but a heavy force of the enemy was between that point and our present position, and were tightening the lines around us every day. An column had sought the Blue Ridge, and were passing south-westward, evidently intending to flank and get in the rear of J
Arlington Heights (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
tinually thrust himself upon popular favor, and obtained the highest rank possible in the service, he never spoke q word in favor of those to whom he was undoubtedly indebted for his greatness. For all that Scott and the War Office cared, Lee might have lived and died a lieutenant-colonel, while others infinitely inferior to him were promoted for political reasons. Virginia having seceded from the Union, Lee tendered his services to his native State. His patrimony was situated on Arlington Heights, overlooking Washington, and he knew every inch of the ground and all its capabilities. He had indeed occupied it with a small force, but was ordered to fall back to Fairfax Court-House by the Minister of War. He was the only man capable of filling the seat of Minister of War, and, upon going to Richmond, was installed in that office, and fulfilled its Herculean duties with great talent and despatch. The line of the Rapidan and Rappahannock rivers was selected by him as our point of
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
my, and design upon Yorktown the approach to Richmond in that direction is not so easy as conjecturprise Magruder at Yorktown, and quietly seize Richmond before any troops could be marched to oppose ons belting the country, from York River to James River, and completely stopping further invasion. ifications on this peninsula from Yorktown to Richmond. When the war broke out, Robert E. Lee wae seat of Minister of War, and, upon going to Richmond, was installed in that office, and fulfilled ever, which he had planned for the defence of Richmond and its vicinity, occupied much of his time, e shallow Warwick to Mulberry Point, on the James River — a distance of about nine miles. The distaowell at Fredericksburgh, in order to move on Richmond from the north; fleets of gunboats and transpng the extremities of our wings on York and James rivers, to throw strong forces on our flanks and retracing their steps up the peninsula towards Richmond, and not one brigade was unnecessarily detain[1 more...]
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
ough to all of the twelve months volunteers who should enlist for the war. Although the entire army accepted these terms and re-enlisted, only a few thousands were permitted to depart at a time. But although this movement was known to McClellan, he did not know that for every man going home on furlough, a regiment travelled on the same train towards Culpeper Court-House and our lines on the Rappahannock River. In fact, McClellan was quietly maturing plans for the surprise and capture of Centreville and Manassas, when Johnston suddenly gave orders for a general retreat, and all our army began to move rapidly southward. This retreat was certainly one of the finest things of the war and the brilliancy of its, design and execution presaged a glorious summer campaign. Se perfectly were all things arranged and so quietly performed, that all stores, baggage, sick, materiel, and guns were removed far to the rear before any of us could realize the possibility of retreat; and it was not
Rich Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
of filling the seat of Minister of War, and, upon going to Richmond, was installed in that office, and fulfilled its Herculean duties with great talent and despatch. The line of the Rapidan and Rappahannock rivers was selected by him as our point of defence; while Beauregard preferred Manassas and Bull Run-much inferior situations, although accidental victory crowned our efforts and immortalized the latter place. The defeat of Pegram in Western Virginia by McClellan and Rosecrans, at Rich Mountain, occurred before Manassas, as I have mentioned in another place. A few weeks after the Yankee rout at Manassas, Lee was sent to Western Virginia, with only a few raw recruits, under Wise and Floyd, to contend against the numerous and well-provided thousands who flocked to the Federal standard from Ohio and other adjacent States, having canal and railroad communication beyond all their necessities. What Lee needed in men he made up by skilful manoeuvres, and by well fortifying differ
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
supplied us with many cannon and stores of all kinds; but while our ports were blockaded, it was sheer madness to incur vast expense in keeping open naval establishments and depots when all our small craft were blocked up in harbors. This' should have been done at first. Ours was a defensive war even upon land; it could not be otherwise on water. It is true that our infant navy achieved great glory in its encounter with the United States vessels, and the names of the Merrimac, Manassas, Arkansas,. Sumter, and Nashville can never be forgotten; and it is doubtful whether any navy in the world did so much with such indifferent resources, While Huger was preparing to evacuate Norfolk, most of our troops were retracing their steps up the peninsula towards Richmond, and not one brigade was unnecessarily detained at Yorktown. General D. H. Hill commanded Yorktown and the left wing; Magruder the right; Longstreet the centre; while Johnston was chief over all. Many episodes and incidents w
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
own the face of the swamp, which were, of course, converted into earthworks, and mounted not less than twenty-two guns, commanded by their accomplished artillerist Ayers, (I follow Yankee authorities.) It was impossible for us to use our guns with much effect, since they were always assailed by enfilade. To obviate this, we were constructing a powerful battery in the rear of the first, the work being chiefly performed by the troops on picket there. While this work was in progress, a North-Carolina regiment was stretched along the right rifle-pit, and four companies of a Louisiana regiment occupied the left. Yankee sharpshooters, posted in trees, had discovered that the three-gun battery was oftentimes comparatively deserted about noon-time, and as the causeway, or dam, was broad, it would not be very difficult to cross the comparatively dry swamp, under cover of their guns, seize the. place, break our chain of defences, and throw over large bodies of troops. Accordingly they gat
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
Chapter 19: Movements in Virginia, and opening of the campaign, April, 1862 troops begin to move on the Upper Potomac in march McClellan prepares to flank Manassas by marching heavy masses up the Shenandoah Valley, and crossing the mou, however, that public opinion would force McClellan into action long before the proper time; for until May the roads in Virginia are impassable. Towards the beginning of March heavy masses of troops were reported moving up towards Harper's Ferry, ave lived and died a lieutenant-colonel, while others infinitely inferior to him were promoted for political reasons. Virginia having seceded from the Union, Lee tendered his services to his native State. His patrimony was situated on Arlington H uncommon to hear one remark, when burying the enemy: Well, Lincoln, old Scoft, and McClellan promised ‘em farms each in Virginia when all was over-old Virginny is large enough to accommodate 'em all with lots, seven by two! But this I wish to repea
Leesburg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
though their force was small, and that of the enemy large, they unexpectedly appeared and disappeared like phantoms before Banks and Shields, acting like Jack-o‘--lanterns to draw them on to destruction. Our position on the Upper Potomac at Leesburgh was also threatened at not less than four points, namely, westward, from Lovettsville and Harper's Ferry; northward, from Point of Rocks; eastward, from Edwards's Ferry; and our rear from Drainsville. It was thought by some that our movement wpatients: If I was only a Yankee, the darned doctors would do more for-me than now. The dead, on all practicable occasions, were decently buried; and in many cases I have known putrid carcases handled and coffined by our men, and even a board placed at the head of the grave, as at Leesburgh, with the words: Here lies a Yankee; Co. H, Fifteenth Massachusetts. I am emphatic about this subject, for many infamous misrepresentations have been widely circulated regarding us by the Northern press
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 20
mber of his troops during the heaviest part of the winter, Johnston had granted thirty days furlough to all of the twelve months volunteers who should enlist for the war. Although the entire army accepted these terms and re-enlisted, only a few thousands were permitted to depart at a time. But although this movement was known to McClellan, he did not know that for every man going home on furlough, a regiment travelled on the same train towards Culpeper Court-House and our lines on the Rappahannock River. In fact, McClellan was quietly maturing plans for the surprise and capture of Centreville and Manassas, when Johnston suddenly gave orders for a general retreat, and all our army began to move rapidly southward. This retreat was certainly one of the finest things of the war and the brilliancy of its, design and execution presaged a glorious summer campaign. Se perfectly were all things arranged and so quietly performed, that all stores, baggage, sick, materiel, and guns were rem
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