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Cape Hatteras (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.54
h we were afterward overtaken. At that time we had no weather signal reports; but, in any event, the sailing would not have been delayed, because the orders to proceed to our work were imperative. It was, of course, learned by all, after reaching the sea, that the destination of the fleet was Hatteras Inlet. Just before midnight the Picket weighed anchor, and we were soon at sea, and it was not long before the little vessel was called upon to test her seagoing ability. On rounding Cape Hatteras we met a very strong breeze, and the little vessel got into the trough of the sea. It seemed for a time as if she would surely be swamped; but by skillful management the captain brought her head-to, after which she behaved better. We passed a most uncomfortable night. Everything on the deck that was not lashed was swept overboard; and the men, furniture, and crockery below decks were thrown about in a most promiscuous manner. The breeze died away toward morning, soon after which a hea
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.54
ers, but on their return the boat was swamped by the breakers on the bar, and they were lost. The loss of these officers occasioned profound gloom throughout New Jersey, and especially at Trenton, where the colonel was widely known and esteemed. Colonel Joseph W. Allen was born in Bristol, Pa., in 1811. He had been for many years a citizen of New Jersey, residing at Bordentown. Educated as a civil engineer, he had executed with signal ability many important works, including numerous railroad enterprises. He had been prominently identified with political affairs, and for six years had represented his county in the State Senate. From the firing upon ath. Surgeon Weller was born at Paterson in 1817, and was a gentleman of great intelligence and private worth, and his death was widely mourned.-Condensed from New Jersey and the rebellion, by John Y. Foster. The crew, who were more skilled in such service, clung to the boat and were rescued. Strange to say, these were the only
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.54
l she was safely anchored inside the harbor. Vessel after vessel followed us in, until we were ready to wish that the fleet were not so large. At one time it seemed as if our little boat would be crushed between two of the larger vessels which had dragged their anchors and were coming down upon her. Fortunately, the commanders of the vessels succeeded in checking them just as they came in contact with us. Most of the fleet arrived inside the bar during the afternoon. The propeller City of New York, which was laden with supplies and ordnance stores, grounded on the bar, and proved a total loss. Her officers and crew clung to the rigging until the next day, when they were rescued by surf-boats sent to their assistance. One of the troop-vessels also grounded on the bar, after nightfall, and it seemed for a time as if she and her precious cargo would be lost. Some gallant volunteers went to her relief with a tugboat, which succeeded in getting her off the bar and into the harbor.
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.54
kill, and integrity. I had been notified by General McClellan that our destination would be Hatteras Inlet, with a view to operations in the inland waters of North Carolina. On the 5th of January the troops began to embark. During that day there were some delays, which resulted from inexperience in the manoeuvring of the vese Fort Macon, Beaufort. To this work General Parke's brigade was ordered. The country between New Berne and Beaufort Colonel Zebulon B. Vance, Governor of North Carolina, 1862-5; at the battle of New Berne, in command of the 26th North Carolina regiment. From a photograph. was immediately occupied, and a passage by hand-car wrow, on the 3d of the following July I was ordered to go to the Peninsula to consult with General McClellan, and after that my duties as commanding officer in North Carolina ended; but a large proportion of the troops of the expedition served under me during the remainder of the war, as members of the gallant Ninth Corps. The
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.54
The Burnside expedition. this paper was read by General Burnside before the soldiers' and sailors' historical Society of Rhode Island, July 7th, 1880, and is included here by permission of the Society, the text being somewhat abridged to conform to the plan of this work.-editors. Ambrose E. Burnside, Major-General, U. S. A. Soon after the 1st Rhode Island regiment was mustered out of service, I was appointed by President Lincoln to the office of brigadier-general. My commission was giApril regular siege operations had been begun by General Parke and were pressed rapidly forward, and by the 26th of April the garrison at Beaufort had been forced to surrender. Thus another victory was to be inscribed upon our banner. The Rhode Island troops bore a most honorable part in this conflict. After that, several small expeditions were sent into the interior of the country, all of which were successful. Much to my sorrow, on the 3d of the following July I was ordered to go to
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.54
mers, sailing vessels, and barges, large enough to transport the division, its armament and supplies, so that it could be rapidly thrown from point to point on the coast with Uniform of the 1st Rhode Island, Colonel A. E. Bijenside, which served at the battle of Bull Run. (see above.) a view to establishing lodgments on the Southern coast, landing troops, and penetrating into the interior, thereby threatening the lines of transportation in the rear of the main army then concentrating in Virginia, and holding possession of the inland waters on the Atlantic coast. After the approval of the plan, I was ordered to New York to fit out the fleet; and on the 23d of October orders were issued establishing my headquarters for the concentration of the troops of the division at Annapolis. Troops arrived from time to time at Annapolis, and all went well in the camp, which was established on beautiful grounds just outside the town. The improvement in drill and discipline was very rapid, b
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.54
o New York to fit out the fleet; and on the 23d of October orders were issued establishing my headquarters for the concentration of the troops of the division at Annapolis. Troops arrived from time to time at Annapolis, and all went well in the camp, which was established on beautiful grounds just outside the town. The improvemenAnnapolis, and all went well in the camp, which was established on beautiful grounds just outside the town. The improvement in drill and discipline was very rapid, but affairs did not progress so smoothly at the headquarters in New York. There was great difficulty in procuring vessels of a light draught, almost everything of that sort having already been called into service; but after much difficulty I was enabled to report to General McClellan on thpoint of embarkation, with bands playing, colors flying, and the men cheering and singing from lightness of heart. As they passed through the quaint old town of Annapolis, the lines of troops, with their dark uniforms and glittering bayonets, contrasted markedly with the snow-clad fields and trees. The men were not cheered and en
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.54
an eight feet of water, together with tug and ferry boats, served to make up the fleet, which gave a capacity to transport 15,000 troops, with baggage, camp-equipage, rations, etc. Lightdraught sailing vessels were also added to the fleet, on which were stored building material for bridges, rafts, scows, intrenching implements, quartermasters' stores, tools, extra ordnance stores, etc. All of these vessels were ordered to rendezvous at Fort Monroe. Coal and water vessels were chartered in Baltimore, and ordered to rendezvous at the same place. The transports were ordered to Annapolis Harbor, at which point, after most mortifying and vexatious delays, they all arrived by the 4th of January, 1862, and on this day were promulgated the orders for embarkation, which were received with most enthusiastic cheers from one end of the camp to the other. I had organized the division into three brigades, which were placed in command of General J. G. Foster, General Jesse L. Reno, and General
Beaufort, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.54
and aided in the transportation of the troops across, and New Berne was occupied on the afternoon of the 14th. It still remained for us to reduce Fort Macon, Beaufort. To this work General Parke's brigade was ordered. The country between New Berne and Beaufort Colonel Zebulon B. Vance, Governor of North Carolina, 1862-5; aBeaufort Colonel Zebulon B. Vance, Governor of North Carolina, 1862-5; at the battle of New Berne, in command of the 26th North Carolina regiment. From a photograph. was immediately occupied, and a passage by hand-car was made between the two places, all the rolling-stock having been run off the road. By the morning of the 11th of April regular siege operations had been begun by General Parke and were pressed rapidly forward, and by the 26th of April the garrison at Beaufort had been forced to surrender. Thus another victory was to be inscribed upon our banner. The Rhode Island troops bore a most honorable part in this conflict. After that, several small expeditions were sent into the interior of the country, all of wh
Bordentown (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 14.54
ederick A. Weller, of the 9th New Jersey, started in a surf-boat to report to me. They succeeded in reaching my headquarters, but on their return the boat was swamped by the breakers on the bar, and they were lost. The loss of these officers occasioned profound gloom throughout New Jersey, and especially at Trenton, where the colonel was widely known and esteemed. Colonel Joseph W. Allen was born in Bristol, Pa., in 1811. He had been for many years a citizen of New Jersey, residing at Bordentown. Educated as a civil engineer, he had executed with signal ability many important works, including numerous railroad enterprises. He had been prominently identified with political affairs, and for six years had represented his county in the State Senate. From the firing upon Fort Sumter he gave all his thoughts and his time to the cause of the Union, at first in the position of Deputy Quartermaster-General, where his energies were devoted to the forwarding of troops. When asked if he c
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