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Fred Crafts (search for this): chapter 10
not be advisable for them to leave there at an earlier date, as in this latitude there frequently occurs some severe weather the latter part of March. As the season is always about a week further advanced at Fort Gibson, there will be no unnecessary delay in their removal. Information was received here yesterday evening that a rebel force of one hundred men were seen the day before in the vicinity of Cane Hill. Colonel Phillips immediately sent out a detachment of cavalry under Captain Fred Crafts to discover the movements of the enemy, but the force returned here this evening without being able to ascertain anything definite in regard to the enemy. It is not very likely that such a small force would remain many hours at any place within twenty miles of this command. This was probably a scouting party of the enemy sent our from the rebel camp below Van Buren, .to discover something if possible in regard to our movements. A detachment of seventy-five men under Captain H. S. A
N. B. Lucas (search for this): chapter 10
rday morning (28th) a detachment of thirty men were sent to Neosho with the mail for the North, and instructions to the commanding officer at Neosho, in regard to removing the troops and all the refugee Indian families from there to the nation. By the time they will be able to join us, their ponies can live by grazing on the grass of the river bottoms. They will no doubt be delighted beyond expression that the time has come for their return to their homes from their long exile. Captain N. B. Lucas and Lieutenant W. M. Smalley, of the battalion of the Sixth Kansas cavalry, with about two hundred men, returned last night from Dutch Mills, a small place a few miles west of Cane Hill, and right on the line of Arkansas and the Cherokee Nation. We wore sent out two days ago with the view of ascertaining as far as possible any contemplated movements of the enemy, as information had been received here via Fayetteville, that a rebel force of a thousand men, under Colonel Carroll, were
H. Z. Curtis (search for this): chapter 10
loyal Arkansas regiments belonging to, Colonel Phillips' division are stationed at Fayetteville, fifteen miles east of us, and co-operation of the two forces in case of emergency would not be difficult. A report comes from St. Louis that General Curtis has been removed from the command of the Department of Missouri for some cause not yet fully known to the public. It is suggested, however, that his removal has been brought about because he cannot give satisfaction to the two political factions in Missouri. The people of Missouri and Kansas, I think, as a general thing, feel kindly towards General Curtis since he won the great battle of Pea Ridge, and saved those States from invasion by the rebel armies, and are not likely to be hasty in passing judgment upon his alleged short-comings in the administration of his department. We do not want a Commanding General with no decided policy, and who will be continually hampering the movements of troops in the field. A party o
Chickasaw Indians (search for this): chapter 10
hostile intentions towards us, and that they are fed by their families clandestinely. Lieutenant Masterton of the Second Indiana battery, was assassinated by just this class of men when we were encamped near here last fall. A number of other officers and soldiers of our division met a similar fate, and we feel that men who flee from us are our enemies, and not to be trusted. No doubt many of the people of this section have exaggerated notions of our troops, particularly Kansas troops and Indians. That the people might not be kept in ignorance of our purposes and actions, I have sometimes thought it should not be regarded as exceeding his duty if our military commander should issue a proclamation to the people of the section we occupy, defining our duties, and setting forth the treatment that will be extended to all who may wish to come in and surrender and renew their allegiance to the Government. If such proclamation were made, and some pains taken to have it put into the hands
since he won the great battle of Pea Ridge, and saved those States from invasion by the rebel armies, and are not likely to be hasty in passing judgment upon his alleged short-comings in the administration of his department. We do not want a Commanding General with no decided policy, and who will be continually hampering the movements of troops in the field. A party of dispatch bearers and mail carries just arrived from Neosho, state that a report came therefrom Springfield, that General Hunter has captured Charleston, S. C., after very hard fighting. While we should be greatly delighted to hear of the fall of that rebel stronghold, we are not inclined to credit the report as true. It is amusing to notice the effects that good reports and bad reports have upon the countenances of our men. A report like the above circulated through the camp, even though some doubt is felt in regard to its truthfulness, lights up the countenances of every loyal heart. The prospect of the early
M. LaRue Harrison (search for this): chapter 10
ys ago with the view of ascertaining as far as possible any contemplated movements of the enemy, as information had been received here via Fayetteville, that a rebel force of a thousand men, under Colonel Carroll, were encamped at Van Buren on the 24th, and were intending to move north on the state line road. From all the information we could get there is no reason to believe that Colonel Carroll's force will make any effort to operate north of the mountains for several weeks. If Colonel M. LaRue Harrison, the commanding officer at Fayetteville, is a good fighter, he should be able to hold that post against three thousand men. He has probably better facilities for keeping himself informed in regard to the movements of the enemy south of him than Colonel Phillips has, for many refugee families are constantly coming into that place from all over the western part of the State. A good many of the families of the men of the two regiments stationed there, have not left their homes. An a
David Mefford (search for this): chapter 10
Chapter 9: The march to camp Moonlight Captain Mefford, Sixth Kansas cavalry, defeats Livingston's band grass sufficient for grazing purposes about Fort Gibson supply train reinforced a bushwhacker killed near camp the people should be better informed by proclamation of the Federal purposes officers for the Fourt field than Colonel Moonlight. His sound judgment and counsel no doubt contributed largely to the success of our campaign in this section last winter. Captain David Mefford, Sixth Kansas cavalry, a few days ago had a skirmish with Livingston's band about sixteen miles north of Neosho, and got three of his men badly wounded, but succeeded in killing and wounding seven of the enemy, and putting the remainder to flight. Captain Mefford is an experienced officer, and a better one could not be selected to deal with Livingston's guerrillas. Several persons who have just arrived from Fort Gibson report that grass is coming up in sufficient quantities on
finest looking officers we had in the division. He is a Scotchman by birth, and is about six feet two inches in height, well proportioned, and his presence, though commanding, is not too stern, and altogether is likely to produce a favorable impression. I remember him during the fall of 1861, as commanding Moonlight's battery, the first light battery raised in Kansas. I think he was also on the staff of General James H. Lane when he marched the Kansas brigade through Missouri to join General Fremont's army at Springfield. No officer has been more active in organizing and fitting out our Kansas troops for the field; nor has any officer been more active in the field than Colonel Moonlight. His sound judgment and counsel no doubt contributed largely to the success of our campaign in this section last winter. Captain David Mefford, Sixth Kansas cavalry, a few days ago had a skirmish with Livingston's band about sixteen miles north of Neosho, and got three of his men badly wounde
H. S. Anderson (search for this): chapter 10
in Fred Crafts to discover the movements of the enemy, but the force returned here this evening without being able to ascertain anything definite in regard to the enemy. It is not very likely that such a small force would remain many hours at any place within twenty miles of this command. This was probably a scouting party of the enemy sent our from the rebel camp below Van Buren, .to discover something if possible in regard to our movements. A detachment of seventy-five men under Captain H. S. Anderson, Third Indian regiment, were sent out to-day to overtake and reinforce the escort to our supply train which left here yesterday morning en route to Fort Scott. It appears that Colonel Phillips has information leading him to believe that the rebel force which was seen a few days ago in the vicinity of Cane Hill, has gone north, possibly with the view of attacking our train. A man was found dead to-day just outside the limits of our camp. Upon investigation the fact was disclosed
, is not known. But as the soldiers express it, it will hardly be safe for them to roost in this vicinity. It is possible that they have been sent by the rebel commanding officer at Van Buren or Fort Smith, into this section, for the purpose of ascertaining whether our whole force is moving south, or only a reconnoitering party. In a few days the organized forces of the enemy north of the Arkansas River will find it convenient to retire to the south bank. There is now no prospect of Colonel Phillip's progress being checked this side of Fort Gibson. Yesterday morning (28th) a detachment of thirty men were sent to Neosho with the mail for the North, and instructions to the commanding officer at Neosho, in regard to removing the troops and all the refugee Indian families from there to the nation. By the time they will be able to join us, their ponies can live by grazing on the grass of the river bottoms. They will no doubt be delighted beyond expression that the time has come
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