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Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
a bolder elevation than the other heights of Bull Run. Upon those hills was fought the first Battl detachment of all arms, to force the line of Bull Run, at Mitchell's and McLean's fords, upon the d and extended a line as that which he held on Bull Run. To do this, was to give the enemy leisure aflanking force marched down the south side of Bull Run, crushed the brigade which guarded the Stone his initial plan, and throw 20,000 men across Bull Run, at and near Sudley Ford, without a show of oile the centre and right were advanced across Bull Run, and swung around into a position parallel tof the Confederate battle on the north side of Bull Run and in their rear, told them that their line an elevated ridge running at right angles to Bull Run, between Young's Branch and another rivulet tut. Every man sought the nearest crossing of Bull Run. Cannon, small arms, standards, were deserte, withering away in inaction on the plains of Bull Run, now doubly pestilential from the miasma of t[11 more...]
Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
de every effort to hold, and the Federal, directed by the veteran skill of General Winfield Scott, to seize this point. It is situated three miles south of Bull Run (a little stream of ten yards' width, almost everywhere fordable), in a smiling champaign, diversified with gentle hills, woodlands, and farmhouses. The water-course takes its rise in a range of highlands, called the Bull Run Mountains, fourteen miles west of the Junction, and, pursuing a southeast course, meets Broad and Cedar Runs five miles east of it, and forms, with them, the Occoquan. The hills near the stream are more lofty and precipitous than the gentle swells which heave up the plain around the Junction; and, on one side or the other, they usually descend steeply to the water, commanding the level meadows which stretch from the opposite bank. Where the meadows happened to be on the north bank, the stream offered some advantages of defence for the Confederates; but where the lowlands were on the south side,
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
urces of the Baltimore Railroad offered ready means; while, from Harper's Ferry to Manassa's Junction, General Johnston must have travelled a more circuitous line; but, by placing his Headquarters at-Winchester, he tempted General Patterson to Martinsburg. The advantages for concentration were now all reversed. General Johnston possessed the interior lino, and was able to move by the shorter route to the support of General Beauregard. The traveller who left the town of Alexandria, upon t the enemy in check, supported, if need be, by General Lee, who, by falling back to the Central Railroad, could reinforce him in a few days; that General Johnston meantime should re-occupy the lower Valley about Winchester, Harper's Ferry, and Martinsburg, and, making it his base, push his powerful corps, by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, direct to the Ohio River; and that thence he should cut off the retreat of General Rosecranz and his whole force, whom General Lee had drawn far eastward in
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
road, brings the traveller to the hamlet of Centreville, seated on a high ridge. Through this littly, the enemy, having assembled in force at Centreville, made a tentative effort with a heavy detac the unwieldy body of the Federal army near Centreville. But Saturday passed, and they had not arrng one strong division to guard his rear at Centreville, paraded another opposite Mitchell's Ford, -guard and their line of communications, at Centreville. The movement was to begin upon the extall the brigades below Cocke's, in front of Centreville, ih a formidable line of battle. This finee to hear his guns open upon the heights of Centreville, until the day and the battle were too far he great causeway, from the Stone Bridge to Centreville, was one surging and maddened mass of men, rsuit of the enemy was not continued beyond Centreville, and this was the first error which made thullocks were feeding in the pastures around Centreville, and the barns of the farmers were loaded w[2 more...]
n's battery, which had entered the action with General Bee's command, and gallantly maintained a perilous position until all its supports were routed. He brought up the other two guns of Stanard, and also the Pendleton battery, so that twelve pieces, which a little after were increased to seventeen, were placed in line under his command behind the crest of the eminence. Behind this formidable array he placed the 4th and 27th Regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Preston and Lieut.-Colonel Echols, lying upon their breasts to avoid the storm of cannon-shot. On the right of the batteries, he posted Harper's 5th Virginia, and on the left the 2d Regiment commanded by Colonel Allen, and the 33d led by Colonel Cummings. Both ends of the brigade, when thus disposed, penetrated the thickets on the right and left, and the 33d was wholly masked by them. On the right of Jackson's Brigade, General Bee placed the remains of the forces which, under him and Evans, had hitherto borne the
Arnold Elzy (search for this): chapter 8
were forming an imposing line of battle, crescent-shaped, with the convex side toward the Confederates, for a final effort. But their hour had passed. The reserves from the extreme right, under Early and Holmes, were now at hand; and better still, the Manassa's Gap Railroad, cleared of its obstructions, was again pouring down the remainder of the Army of the Valley. General Kirby Smith led a body of these direct to the field, and receiving at once a dangerous wound, was replaced by Colonel Arnold Elzy, whom Beauregard styled the Blucher of his Waterloo. These troops being hurled against the enemy's right, while the victorious Confederates in the centre turned against them their own artillery, they speedily broke, and their retreat became a panic rout. Every man sought the nearest crossing of Bull Run. Cannon, small arms, standards, were deserted. The great causeway, from the Stone Bridge to Centreville, was one surging and maddened mass of men, horses, artillery, and baggage, a
ery, so that twelve pieces, which a little after were increased to seventeen, were placed in line under his command behind the crest of the eminence. Behind this formidable array he placed the 4th and 27th Regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Preston and Lieut.-Colonel Echols, lying upon their breasts to avoid the storm of cannon-shot. On the right of the batteries, he posted Harper's 5th Virginia, and on the left the 2d Regiment commanded by Colonel Allen, and the 33d led by Colonel Cummings. Both ends of the brigade, when thus disposed, penetrated the thickets on the right and left, and the 33d was wholly masked by them. On the right of Jackson's Brigade, General Bee placed the remains of the forces which, under him and Evans, had hitherto borne the heat and burden of the day, while, on the left, a few regiments of Virginian and Carolinian troops were stationed. At this stage of affairs, Generals Johnston and Beauregard galloped to the front, inspiriting the men by thei
column of march, and, while the remainder came to the ground designed for them, these two pieces held the enemy in check by their accurate fire. The opposing batteries were then upon the hill beyond the valley in front, which was also swarming with heavy masses of Federal infantry. Jackson recalled Imboden's battery, which had entered the action with General Bee's command, and gallantly maintained a perilous position until all its supports were routed. He brought up the other two guns of Stanard, and also the Pendleton battery, so that twelve pieces, which a little after were increased to seventeen, were placed in line under his command behind the crest of the eminence. Behind this formidable array he placed the 4th and 27th Regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Preston and Lieut.-Colonel Echols, lying upon their breasts to avoid the storm of cannon-shot. On the right of the batteries, he posted Harper's 5th Virginia, and on the left the 2d Regiment commanded by Colonel A
Patterson (search for this): chapter 8
Beauregard could at any time have been increased, by suddenly withdrawing General Patterson's army from the Upper Potomac to Washington, for which the vast resourcesrcuitous line; but, by placing his Headquarters at-Winchester, he tempted General Patterson to Martinsburg. The advantages for concentration were now all reversed. No man knew the intent, save that it was supposed they were about to attack Patterson, who lay to the north of them, from Bunker Hill to Smithfield, with twenty thashington, it could expect nothing else than to meet the unbroken army of General Patterson, which, it was well known, was effecting a junction with that of McDowellrt might lead them to the spoils of a wealthy capital. If the arrival of General Patterson's army was suspected, it was not known. At the most, it was only the armackson was piercing the centre of McDowell, with a fatal thrust, at Manassas, Patterson was haranguing his mutinous troops at Charleston, within a few miles of the l
Richard Garnett (search for this): chapter 8
only by the circumstances within his own field of operations, but by his relations to the Confederate commanders on his right and left. In the northwest was General Garnett, who, with five thousand men, confronted a Federal army of four times that number, commanded by Generals McClellan and Rosecranz. Had this army been overpowess to leave a loyal population exposed, even for a time, to the oppressions of a clique of traitors, backed by invaders. A small army was sent thither, under General Garnett, through vast difficulties. It numbered about 5000 men, and, as might have been expected, found itself confronted by a force of fourfold numbers and resourcetch it to the Northwest, and the modest belief, that he could march with it to the Ohio River. He declared that he was willing to serve in any capacity under General Garnett, then commanding there. After that unfortunate commander was killed, and his army expelled from the country, the Confederate Government sent out from Staunto
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