hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas J. Jackson 924 2 Browse Search
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) 280 0 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 279 1 Browse Search
Cummings Jackson 278 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 269 1 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 236 0 Browse Search
Tom Jackson 196 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 178 0 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 175 19 Browse Search
Henry Jackson 169 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson. Search the whole document.

Found 620 total hits in 108 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 8
rom Staunton a much more powerful expedition, under General Robert E. Lee. This commander endeavored to shorten the arduous Jackson concurred. He wrote, August 15th, to his wife:--General Lee has recently gone west, and I hope that we will soon heaour God has again crowned our arms with victory. . .. If General Lee remains in the Northwest, I would like to go there and gr our section of the State have greatly brightened since General Lee has gone there. Something brilliant may be expected in . In a few weeks, the unavoidable obstacles surrounding General Lee's line of operations disclosed the truth, that, althoughs, to hold the enemy in check, supported, if need be, by General Lee, who, by falling back to the Central Railroad, could reie retreat of General Rosecranz and his whole force, whom General Lee had drawn far eastward into the gorges of the Alleghanieivity, neither attempting nor accomplishing any.-thing. General Lee was held in check, not by the enemy, but by the mud, and
en across Bull Run, at and near Sudley Ford, without a show of opposition. Colonel Evans, with a weak brigade of 1100 men, held the Confederate left, and watched thow, Brigadier-General Cocke, with three regiments, guarded the next ford. When Evans ascertained that the enemy were already threatening his rear, he left the bridgm to move to the Stone Bridge, and assume the task of guarding it, in place of Evans, who had gone westward to meet the enemy descending from Sudley. But as Jacksoards it, sending forward a messenger to General Bee, who had already reinforced Evans, to encourage him with the tidings, that he was coming to his support with all on's Brigade, General Bee placed the remains of the forces which, under him and Evans, had hitherto borne the heat and burden of the day, while, on the left, a few rwould have anticipated, as Jackson did, without actual testimony. When Bee and Evans were repulsed in the forenoon, the Federalists had telegraphed to Washington th
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 8
Chapter 7: Manassas. The movement of General Johnston from Harper's Ferry to Winchester was dicas it was during the month of July, while General Johnston was at Harper's Ferry, the victorious forrom Harper's Ferry to Manassa's Junction, General Johnston must have travelled a more circuitous linfor concentration were now all reversed. General Johnston possessed the interior lino, and was able, General Beauregard had given notice to General Johnston, that the time had arrived for him to renops had gone three miles from Winchester, General Johnston commanded the whole column to halt, and awo. The Confederate general proposed, if General Johnston's reinforcements had arrived in time, to ied with what it did, and so are my Generals, Johnston and Beauregard. ... I am thankful to our everad so often recoiled before the 11,000 of General Johnston. How then could it meet 40,000 Confedera, could reinforce him in a few days; that General Johnston meantime should re-occupy the lower Valle[8 more...]
extreme right. But the other two were those of Generals Bee and Jackson, and the heroism of these two was sustened towards it, sending forward a messenger to General Bee, who had already reinforced Evans, to encourage hadvanced to their assistance, he met the fragments of Bee's regiment sullenly retiring, while the heavy lines oine of battle, assuming the centre for himself, while Bee rallied his men in the rear, and then resumed his plaoden's battery, which had entered the action with General Bee's command, and gallantly maintained a perilous posked by them. On the right of Jackson's Brigade, General Bee placed the remains of the forces which, under himresistible numbers overwhelmed the shattered ranks of Bee. It was then that this general rode up to Jacksonckson, calm and curt, we will give them the bayonet. Bee seemed to catch the inspiration of his determined wilated, as Jackson did, without actual testimony. When Bee and Evans were repulsed in the forenoon, the Federali
d. And, therefore, notwithstanding the imperfections of the Confederate army, the present was its opportunity, and its earliest blows would be successful at least cost to it. A few days after the battle of Manassas, General Jackson moved his brigade to a pleasant woodland, a mile in advance of Centreville. There he busied himself in perfecting the discipline of the troops. After a time the Confederate generals, whose forces had grown to about 60,000 men, pushed their lines forward to Munson's and Mason's Hills, within sight of the Federal capital, and erected slight earthworks upon these eminences. Their object was to tempt General McClellan to an assault. But this leader was too well taught by the disasters of Bull Run to risk a general action. He occupied the attention of the Confederates with skirmishes of pickets and occasional feints, which required the advance of heavy supports to the front. In these alarms the 1st Brigade was always conspicuous for the promptitude wi
George Washington (search for this): chapter 8
ichmond, arrive within the entrenchments at Manassa's Junction, who were burning with enthusiasm, and expected nothing else than to be led against the enemy at once. In a few days, the patriotic citizens of Alexandria sent authentic intelligence of the condition of the beaten rabble there, and in Washington, which a true military sagacity would have anticipated, as Jackson did, without actual testimony. When Bee and Evans were repulsed in the forenoon, the Federalists had telegraphed to Washington that the rebels were beaten in the open field; that the Grand Army was marching triumphantly upon the Junction; and that victory was assured. This premature boast the vain confidence of the Federals accepted as sufficient, and they spent the remainder of the Sabbath-day in exultation; but the dawn of Monday revealed to the citizens of Alexandria a different story. Already the streets were full of a miserable, jaded, and unarmed rabble, whose fears had given them wings to flee the thirty
racy, and was confronted by the strongest of all the Federal armies, under General McDowell. The fearful preponderance against Beauregard could at any time have beenfought the first Battle of Manassas. On the 16th of July, the hosts of General McDowell left their entrenched camps along the Potomac, and drove in the advance ofn to the rumor of a fresh force advancing from the east, the masses which General McDowell had that day displayed on the left and front, all of which were now discomroposed attack was intended to be only in concert with the one already made by McDowell, so that the most speedy and certain way to repel it was to precipitate the roral Patterson, which, it was well known, was effecting a junction with that of McDowell. The reply to these pleas is, that the military intuitions of Jackson told hed with victory? But in truth, at the hour Jackson was piercing the centre of McDowell, with a fatal thrust, at Manassas, Patterson was haranguing his mutinous troop
Jackson recalled Imboden's battery, which had entered the action with General Bee's command, and gallantly maintained a perilous position until all its supports were routed. He brought up the other two guns of Stanard, and also the Pendleton battery, so that twelve pieces, which a little after were increased to seventeen, were placed in line under his command behind the crest of the eminence. Behind this formidable array he placed the 4th and 27th Regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Preston and Lieut.-Colonel Echols, lying upon their breasts to avoid the storm of cannon-shot. On the right of the batteries, he posted Harper's 5th Virginia, and on the left the 2d Regiment commanded by Colonel Allen, and the 33d led by Colonel Cummings. Both ends of the brigade, when thus disposed, penetrated the thickets on the right and left, and the 33d was wholly masked by them. On the right of Jackson's Brigade, General Bee placed the remains of the forces which, under him and Evans,
Rosecranz (search for this): chapter 8
f operations, but by his relations to the Confederate commanders on his right and left. In the northwest was General Garnett, who, with five thousand men, confronted a Federal army of four times that number, commanded by Generals McClellan and Rosecranz. Had this army been overpowered, as it was during the month of July, while General Johnston was at Harper's Ferry, the victorious forces of McClellan would have been in a condition to threaten his rear at Winchester. East of the Blue Ridge, Gd re-occupy the lower Valley about Winchester, Harper's Ferry, and Martinsburg, and, making it his base, push his powerful corps, by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, direct to the Ohio River; and that thence he should cut off the retreat of General Rosecranz and his whole force, whom General Lee had drawn far eastward into the gorges of the Alleghanies. The capture of the larger part of the Federal army, and the deliverance of the country, he thought, could hardly fail to reward the prompt exe
Carolinian (search for this): chapter 8
of the batteries, he posted Harper's 5th Virginia, and on the left the 2d Regiment commanded by Colonel Allen, and the 33d led by Colonel Cummings. Both ends of the brigade, when thus disposed, penetrated the thickets on the right and left, and the 33d was wholly masked by them. On the right of Jackson's Brigade, General Bee placed the remains of the forces which, under him and Evans, had hitherto borne the heat and burden of the day, while, on the left, a few regiments of Virginian and Carolinian troops were stationed. At this stage of affairs, Generals Johnston and Beauregard galloped to the front, inspiriting the men by their words and fearless exposure of their persons, and assisted in advancing the standards of the rallying regiments. Their appeals were answered by the fierce cheers of the Confederates; and a new battle now began, to which the former was but a skirmish. Jackson's Brigade numbered 2600 bayonets, and all the troops confronting the enemy, about 6500. The Feder
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11