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Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
o-day, to the effect that Gen. Hill is likely to take Washington and Newbern, N. C.; Gen. Longstreet, Suffolk; and Gen. Wise, Fort Magruder, and the Peninsula-he has not troops enough. Gold advanced 7 per cent. in New York when the news of the reconnoissance reached that city. We are planting almost every acre in grain, to the exclusion of cotton and tobacco-resolved never to be starved, nor even feel a scarcity of provisions in future. We shall be cutting wheat in another month in Alabama and other States. Among the other rumors, it is said Hooker is falling back toward Washington, but these are merely rumors. The President is in a very feeble and nervous condition, and is really threatened with the loss of sight altogether. But he works on; and few or no visitors are admitted. He remains at his dwelling, and has not been in the executive office these ten days. Col. Lay was merry again to-day. He ordered in another foreign substitute (in North Carolina). P
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
g badly damaged. But before leaving that part of the coast, the Yankees succeeded in intercepting and sinking the merchant steamer Leopard, having 40,000 pairs of shoes, etc. on board for our soldiers. It is supposed they will reappear before Wilmington; our batteries there are ready for them. Gen. Wise assailed the enemy on Saturday, at Williamsburg, captured the town, and drove the Federals into their fortMa-gruder. The President was ill and nervous, on Saturday. His wife, who lost m inclined to think provisions would not be deficient, to an alarming extent, if they were equally distributed. Wood is no scarcer than before the war, and yet $30 per load (less than a cord) is demanded for it, and obtained. The other day Wilmington might have been taken, for the troops were sent to Beauregard. Their places have since been filled by a brigade from Longstreet. It is a monstrous undertaking to attempt to subjugate so vast a country as this, even with its disparity of popul
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ilege, and will use it, of sending papers directly to the Secretary. Gen. Lee telegraphs the President to-day to send troops to Gordonsville, and to hasten forward supplies. He says Lt.-Gen. Longstreet's corps might now be sent from Suffolk to him. Something of magnitude is on the tapis, whether offensive or defensive, I could not judge from the dispatch. We had hail this evening as large as pullets' eggs. The Federal papers have accounts of brilliant successes in Louisiana and Missouri, having taken 1600 prisoners in the former State and defeated Price at Cape Girardeau in the latter. Whether these accounts are authentic or not we have no means of knowing yet. We have nothing further from Mississippi. It is said there is some despondency in Washington. Our people will die in the last ditch rather than be subjugated and see the confiscation of their property. April 30 The enemy are advancing across the Rappahannock, and the heavy skirmishing which precedes a
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
shops, and the pillage was pretty extensive. Crowds of women, Marylanders and foreigners, were standing at the street corners to-day, still demanding food; which, it is said, the government issued to them. About midday the City Battalion was marched down Main Street to disperse the crowd. Congress has resolved to adjourn on the 20th April. The tax bill has not passed both Houses yet. Gen. Blanchard has been relieved of his command in Louisiana. He was another general from Massachusetts. April 4 It is the belief of some that the riot was a premeditated affair, stimulated from the North, and executed through the instrumentality of emissaries. Some of the women, and others, have been arrested. We have news of the capture of another of the enemy's gunboats, in Berwick Bay, Louisiana, with five guns. It is said to have been done by cavalry. A dispatch just received from Charleston states that the enemy's monitors were approaching the forts, seven in number,
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
lined my plan of deriving supplies directly from the people, and then adopted it. April 29 Gen. Beauregard is eager to have completed the Torpedo ram, building at Charleston, and wants a great gun for it. But the Secretary of the Navy wants all the iron for mailing his gun-boats. Mr. Miles, of South Carolina, says the ram will be worth two gun-boats. The President of the Manassas Gap Railroad says his company is bringing all its old iron to the city. Wherefore? The merchants of Mobile are protesting against the impressment by government agents of the sugar and molasses in the city. They say this conduct will double the prices. So Congress did not and cannot restrain the military authorities. Gen. Humphrey Marshall met with no success in Kentucky. He writes that none joined him, when he was led to expect large accessions, and that he could get neither stock nor hogs. Alas, poor Kentucky! The brave hunters of former days have disappeared from the scene. The Sec
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ax bill has not passed both Houses yet. Gen. Blanchard has been relieved of his command in Louisiana. He was another general from Massachusetts. April 4 It is the belief of some that the rby an army, and the position maintained, Vicksburg is doomed. We shall get no more sugar from Louisiana. April 28 The enemy's raid in Mississippi seems to have terminated at Enterprise, where ning as large as pullets' eggs. The Federal papers have accounts of brilliant successes in Louisiana and Missouri, having taken 1600 prisoners in the former State and defeated Price at Cape Girarnas? If so, he will repent his error. We hear of fighting in Northwestern Virginia and in Louisiana, but know not the result. The enemy have in possession all of Louisiana west of the MississipLouisiana west of the Mississippi River. This is bad for us,sugar and salt will be scarcer still. At Grand Gulf our batteries have repulsed their gun-boats, but the battle is to be renewed. The railroad presidents have met i
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
harleston, the precise nature of which is not yet permitted to transpire. Generals Johnston and Bragg write that Gen. Pillow has secured ten times as many conscripts, under their orders, as the bureau in Richmond would have done. Judge Campbell, as Assistant Secretary of War, having arrested Gen. P.'s operations, Generals J. and B. predict that our army in Tennessee will begin, immediately, to diminish in numbers. The rails of the York River Railroad are being removed to-day toward Danville, in view of securing a connection with the N. C. Central Road. It seems that the government thinks the enemy will again possess the York River Railroad, but it cannot be possible a retreat out of Virginia is meditated. April 7 Nothing definite has transpired at Charleston, or if so, we have not received information of it yet. From the West, we have accounts, from Northern papers, of the failure of the Yankee Yazoo expedition. That must have its effect. Judge Campbell, Assista
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
ppahannock. April 1 It is said we have taken Washington, a village in North Carolina. And it is represented that large supplies of meat, etc. can be taken fromnt is issuing rice to the people. April 3 Gen. D. H. Hill writes from North Carolina that the business of conscription is miserably mismanaged in that State. Tance is furious at the idea of conscribing magistrates, constables, etc. in North Carolina. He says it would be an annihilation of State Rights-nevertheless, being s. Lay was merry again to-day. He ordered in another foreign substitute (in North Carolina). Pins are so scarce and costly, that it is now a pretty general practien to extort high prices from the destitute. An intelligent gentleman from North Carolina told me, to-day, that food was never more abundant in his State; nevertheleeceived from Gov. Vance to-day, stating that, upon examination, the State (North Carolina) contains a much larger supply of meat and grain than was supposed. The St
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
e complains that his army is not fed. we fear for Vicksburg now. enemy giving up plunder in Mississippi. Beaston, the enemy not having renewed the attack. At Vicksburg all was quiet, and the enemy abandoning their cana down the Mississippi in spite of our batteries at Vicksburg, which sunk one of them. If this be true, it is batches (unofficial) confirmatory of the passing of Vicksburg by the enemy's gun-boats. One of them was destroyn reports that the enemy's gun-boats, which passed Vicksburg, have recaptured the Queen of the West! It must bof the enemy's gunboats and transports have passed Vicksburg! These are untoward tidings. Gens. Pemberton andsippi some 200 miles, down to the railroad between Vicksburg and Meridian. This is in the rear and east of ViVicksburg, and intercepts supplies They destroyed two trains. This dispatch was sent to the Secretary of War by supported by an army, and the position maintained, Vicksburg is doomed. We shall get no more sugar from Louisi
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 26
his army is not fed. we fear for Vicksburg now. enemy giving up plunder in Mississippi. Beauregard is busy at Charleston. Gen. Marshall, of Kentucky, fails to geed masters. Notwithstanding the Enquirer urges it, and Mr. Barksdale, of Mississippi, persistently advocates it, Congress still refuses to confer additional powehave bad news from the West. The enemy (cavalry, I suppose) have penetrated Mississippi some 200 miles, down to the railroad between Vicksburg and Meridian. This iany conception of the surprise the enemy was executing at the moment? Well, Mississippi is the President's State, and if he is satisfied with Northern generals to de shall get no more sugar from Louisiana. April 28 The enemy's raid in Mississippi seems to have terminated at Enterprise, where we collected a force and offerthentic or not we have no means of knowing yet. We have nothing further from Mississippi. It is said there is some despondency in Washington. Our people will
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