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Louis A. Grant (search for this): chapter 29
onstrations to prevent my reinforcement of General Grant, began himself to detach to General Lee bthe success of any mounted operations, but General Grant being very desirous to have the railroads g campaign, I having already received from General Grant an intimation of what was expected of me. ist them till out of the exhausted valley. Grant's orders were for me to destroy the Virginia Che Virginia Central railroad and then join General Grant in front of Petersburg. I was master of tth, and from there sent a communication to General Grant reporting what had occurred, informing himear. It was of the utmost importance that General Grant should receive these despatches without chhe Union lines, deliver their tidings into General Grant's hands. Each set of messengers got throupy confided to Campbell and Rowan was first at Grant's headquarters. I halted for one day at Coling a force there to prevent my junction with Grant, and that Pickett's division, which had been s[2 more...]
Alfred T. A. Torbert (search for this): chapter 29
Petersburg, as was definitely ascertained by Torbert in a reconnoissance to Mount Jackson. At thifor the purpose, but when I informed him that Torbert's reconnoissance had developed the fact that r I started the cavalry out for that purpose, Torbert, with Merritt and Powell, marching through Ched toward Staunton to make a demonstration in Torbert's favor, hoping to hold the enemy's troops ininfantry was sent to Charlottesville to check Torbert, but this had already been done by Lomax, wittes had been closely observing the columns of Torbert and Custer, and in consequence of the knowlednding Rosser down the valley to meet Custer. Torbert in the performance of his task captured two pdress without delay, Fifth expedition: General Torbert's raid to Gordonsville. and in answer toevery remnant of organized Confederates. General Torbert being absent on leave at this time, I didpointed General Merritt Chief of Cavalry, for Torbert had disappointed me on two important occasion
Harry Gilmore (search for this): chapter 29
ster surprised Colonel Young sent to capture Gilmore the guerrilla Colonel Young's success captus under such partisan chiefs as Mosby, White, Gilmore, McNeil, and others, and this had considerablhe guerrillas infesting West Virginia. Harry Gilmore, of Maryland, was the most noted of these ese spies returned with the intelligence that Gilmore was on his way to Moorefield, the centre of a Baltimore and Ohio railroad. Believing that Gilmore might be captured, I directed Young to undert a week these men came back and reported that Gilmore was living at a house between three and four pass his party off as a body of recruits for Gilmore coming from Maryland and pursued by the Yankethe Union cavalry, gained immediate access to Gilmore's room. He found the bold guerrilla snugly tisoner to one of Sheridan's staff. Meanwhile Gilmore's men had learned of his trouble, but the eare was sent to Fort Warren. The capture of Gilmore caused the disbandment of the party he had or[1 more...]
Wesley Merritt (search for this): chapter 29
General Early reorganizes his forces Mosby the guerrilla General Merritt sent to operate against Mosby Rosser again active General Cur feeling my front, and with the usual ill-fortune to his cavalry; Merritt and Custer driving Rosser and Lomax with ease across Cedar Creek olull that now occurred; so on the 28th of November, I directed General Merritt to march to the Loudoun Valley and operate against Mosby, takie, on account of their intimate knowledge of the mountain region. Merritt carried out his instructions with his usual sagacity and thoroughncattle, hogs and sheep, which were issued to the troops. While Merritt was engaged in this service the Baltimore and Ohio railroad once mDecember I started the cavalry out for that purpose, Torbert, with Merritt and Powell, marching through Chester Gap, while Custer moved towarg me almost every day intelligence Map: Fourth expedition. General Merritt's raid to Loudon. from within Early's lines, but they also op
Alfred Gibbs (search for this): chapter 29
battle of Cedar Creek until it reached New Market, though at Fisher's Hill was left a small rear-guard of cavalry, which hastily decamped, however, when charged by Gibbs's brigade on the morning of the 20th. Between the date of his signal defeat and the 11th of November, the enemy's scattered forces had sufficiently reorganized toter camped at Brookfield, Devin remaining at Waynesboroa. The former started for Charlottesville the next morning early, followed by Devin with but two brigades. Gibbs having been left behind to blow up the iron railroad bridge across South River. Because of the incessant rains and spring thaws the roads were very soft, and the But this little scene did not delay Custer long enough to prevent his capturing, just beyond the village, a small body of cavalry and three pieces of artillery. Gibbs's brigade, which was bringing up my mud-impeded train, did not arrive until the 5th of March. In the mean time Young's scouts had brought word that the garrison o
Andrew Johnson (search for this): chapter 29
rt, but this had already been done by Lomax, with the assistance of infantry sent up from Richmond. Indeed, from the very beginning of the movement the Confederates had been closely observing the columns of Torbert and Custer, and in consequence of the knowledge thus derived, Early had marched Lomax to Gordonsville in anticipation of an attack there, at the same time sending Rosser down the valley to meet Custer. Torbert in the performance of his task captured two pieces of artillery from Johnson's and McCausland's brigades, at Liberty Mills on the Rapidan River, but in the main the purpose of the raid utterly failed, so by the 27th of December he returned, many of his men badly frost-bitten from the extreme cold which had prevailed. This expedition practically closed all operations for the season, and the cavalry was put into winter cantonment near Winchester. The distribution of my infantry to Petersburg and West Virginia left with me in the beginning of the new year, as alre
George Crook (search for this): chapter 29
surprised Colonel Young sent to capture Gilmore the guerrilla Colonel Young's success capture of General Kelly and General Crook spies was Wilkes Booth a spy? driving the Confederates out of the Valley the battle of Waynesboroa marching to jderates in West Virginia, and the intelligence that they were contemplating further raids in that section, led me to send Crook there with one division, his other troops going to City Point; and I hoped that all the threatened places would thus be ed into Cumberland, Maryland, at 3 o'clock on the morning of the 21st of February and made a reprisal by carrying off General Crook and General Kelly, and doing their work so silently and quickly that they escaped without being noticed, and were some distance on their way before the colored watchman at the hotel where Crook was quartered could compose himself enough to give the alarm. A troop of cavalry gave hot chase from Cumberland, striving to intercept the party at Moorefield and other po
and as he did so the Eighth New York and First Connecticut, in a charge in column, broke through the opening made by Custer, and continued on through the town of Waynesboroa, never stopping till they crossed South River. There, finding themselves immediately in the enemy's rear, they promptly formed as foragers and held the east bank of the stream till all the Confederates surrendered except Rosser, who succeeded in making his way back to the valley, and Generals Early, Wharton, Long, and Lilley, who, with fifteen or twenty men, escaped across the Blue Ridge. I followed up the victory immediately by despatching Capehart through Rock-fish Gap, with orders to encamp on the east side of the Blue Ridge. By reason of this move all the enemy's stores and transportation fell into our hands, while we captured on the field seventeen battle flags, sixteen hundred officers and men, and eleven pieces of artillery. This decisive victory closed hostilities in the Shenandoah Valley. The prison
isoner to one of Sheridan's staff. Meanwhile Gilmore's men had learned of his trouble, but the early appearance of Colonel Whittaker caused them to disperse; thus the last link between Maryland and the Confederacy was carried a prisoner to Winchester, whence he was sent to Fort Warren. The capture of Gilmore caused the disbandment of the party he had organized at the camp-meeting, most of the men he had recruited returning to their homes discouraged, though some few joined the bands of Woodson and young Jesse McNeil, which, led by the latter, dashed into Cumberland, Maryland, at 3 o'clock on the morning of the 21st of February and made a reprisal by carrying off General Crook and General Kelly, and doing their work so silently and quickly that they escaped without being noticed, and were some distance on their way before the colored watchman at the hotel where Crook was quartered could compose himself enough to give the alarm. A troop of cavalry gave hot chase from Cumberland, s
Charles L. Fitzhugh (search for this): chapter 29
roughly the James River canal and the Virginia Central railroad and then join General Grant in front of Petersburg. I was master of the whole country north of the James as far down as Goochland; hence the destruction of these arteries of supply could be easily compassed, and feeling that the war was nearing its end, I desired my cavalry to be in at the death. On March 9 the main column started eastward down the James River, destroying locks, dams, and boats, having been preceded by Colonel Fitzhugh's brigade of Devin's division in a forced march to Goochland and Beaver Dam Creek, with orders to destroy everything below Columbia. I made Columbia on the 10th, and from there sent a communication to General Grant reporting what had occurred, informing him of my condition and intention, asking him to send forage and rations to meet me at the White House, and also a pontoon-bridge to carry me over the Pamunkey, for in view of the fact that hitherto it had been impracticable to hold Lee
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