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Bayport (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
and-sharks, who rarely gave a fair account of the money which passed through their hands. But when the big holes and the small leaks on the blockade were all closed up, the tale was told at Appomattox, where General Grant had to serve out rations to Lee's soldiers and give them enough to enable them to reach their homes. A launch and cutter from the Sagamore and others from the Fort Henry, including an ambulance boat, were added to this expedition and the whole force proceeded direct to Bayport, while the Sagamore remained in the offing to prevent the escape of Confederate vessels. Great difficulties attended this expedition, as the weather was very unfavorable, but the main object was handsomely carried out. The sloop Helen, of Crystal River,loaded with corn, was burnt, and the boats pushed on for a large schooner on the inside, loaded with cotton and said to contain three hundred bales. As they pulled for the schooner the boats were opened upon by a battery of two guns
Cuba, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
vy could show his high appreciation of Bailey's gallantry and devotion to his country's service. The limits of this command extended along the Florida Peninsula from Cape Canaveral on the east, to Pensacola on the west. Up to December, 1863, the little squadron under Bailey had exercised the greatest watchfulness along the coast, had captured many prizes, and had apparently broken up the illicit traffic by which the Confederates had been supplied with munitions of war. Lying adjacent to Cuba, and at no great distance from the English possessions of Nassau and Bermuda, the coast of Florida presented many available points for the introduction of all kinds of material by means of small vessels that could enter the shallow harbors, streams and inlets with which this State abounds. But notwithstanding the advantages these small craft possessed for eluding the blockaders, they could not carry on their trade with impunity. From the time that Bailey took command, up to the end of the
Old Tampa Bay (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
es, were burned. The whole establishment was completely blotted out without the loss of a man, in which these expeditions were not always so fortunate. On the 16th of October an expedition was fitted out to destroy two blockade-running steamers in Hillsboro River. Lieutenant-Commander A. A. Semmes, in the gun-boat Tahoma (assisted by the Adela), was directed to divert attention from the expedition by shelling the town and fort and to land men under cover of the night at a point in Old Tampa Bay, some distance from the fort, to proceed overland to the point on the Hillsboro River where the blockade-runners lay, and destroy them. On the date mentioned, the Tahoma and Adela ran in abreast of the batteries, and shelled them slowly during the day, their fire being unusually accurate. As soon as the moon went down that evening, a force of sixty men, under Acting-Ensigns J. P. Randall and J. G. Koehler, from the Tahoma, and forty men, under Acting-Ensigns F. A. Strandberg and Edwa
Hillsboro River (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
of important salt works by boat's crew from steamer Somerset. Tahoma and Adela shell Confederate batteries. destruction of two blockade-running steamers in Hillsboro River. blockade-running broken up. list of vessels composing east Gulf Squadron under Acting-Rear-Admiral Bailey. list of officers. Acting Rear-Admiral Theodon, in which these expeditions were not always so fortunate. On the 16th of October an expedition was fitted out to destroy two blockade-running steamers in Hillsboro River. Lieutenant-Commander A. A. Semmes, in the gun-boat Tahoma (assisted by the Adela), was directed to divert attention from the expedition by shelling the town and fort and to land men under cover of the night at a point in Old Tampa Bay, some distance from the fort, to proceed overland to the point on the Hillsboro River where the blockade-runners lay, and destroy them. On the date mentioned, the Tahoma and Adela ran in abreast of the batteries, and shelled them slowly during the d
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 38
at section of the country, the years spent in hunting the Indian in dismal swamps and forest fastnesses, had produced a class of people far more barbarous than the Indians themselves — men without any sentiment but a love of plunder, who placed no more value on human life than on the life of a dog. Yet they were intrepid and defied all laws, human and divine, and the only way to touch their understanding was by the most severe retaliation. On Friday, March 20th, an expedition left the United States bark Amanda, for the purpose of proceeding to the Ocklockonnee River, to cut out the schooner Forward, supposed to be loaded with cotton. The expedition was under the charge of Acting-Master R. J. Hoffner, and consisted of two boats and twenty-seven men, with a boat howitzer. Great difficulty was encountered in finding the mouth of the river, and the boats constantly grounded on oyster beds, over which they had to be hauled in the night for fear of discovery, but at daylight the entr
Charlotte Harbor (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
on their trade with impunity. From the time that Bailey took command, up to the end of the year, more than 100 vessels were captured or destroyed by the squadron. From Cape Canaveral, all along the eastern shore of Florida to Cape Sable, are numerous passages and inlets where vessels could with safety land their cargoes of arms or provisions in a night and be out of sight of the blockaders when daylight came. Following the coast up to the northward were the Ten Thousand Islands, Charlotte Harbor, Tampa Bay, Crystal River. Cedar Keys, Suwanee River, Appalache Bay, St. George's Bay, Appalachicola, St. Andrew's Bay, and a thousand other places of refuge too numerous to mention. Arms and munitions of war of all kinds could have been landed but for the watchfulness of the naval vessels. Florida, with its inaccessible and tortuous channels, and numerous islands surrounded by impenetrable swamps, was just the place to tempt smugglers, they being led there by the quantity of game
A. M. Stewart (search for this): chapter 38
Steamer Somerset. Lieutenant-Commander, A. F. Crosman; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, James Mecray, Jr.; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, S. W. Adams; Acting-Masters, W. E. Dennison, J. S. Higbee, E. C. Healy and Thos. Chatfield; Acting-Master's Mates, C. H. Brantingham, T. M. Toombs and J. H. Stotsenburg; Engineers, W. D. Peters, W. H. Smith, E. Choppell and John Doyle. Steamer Lodona. Acting-Lieutenant, E. R. Colhoun; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, T. W. Meckley Acting-Assistant Paymaster, A. M. Stewart; Acting-Masters, Lewis West and J. P. Carr; Acting-Ensigns, H. G. McKenna and N. W. Rathbone; Acting-Master's Mates, Le Grand B. Brigham, W. A. Byrnes and F. E. Brecht; Engineers, F. A. Bremen, I. B. Hewett, S. D. Loring, O. B. Mills and James Mollineaux. Steamer Fort Henry. Acting-Lieutenant, Edward Y. McCauley; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Joseph Stevens; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Daniel Whalen; Acting-Masters, R. B. Smith, F. W. Partridge and Geo. Leinas; Acting-Ensign, Geo. W. B
William Ronckendorff (search for this): chapter 38
ship. Commander, James F. Schenck; Fleet Surgeon, G. R. B. Horner; Paymaster, Washington Irving; Assistant Surgeon, W. K. Van Reypen; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, A. B. Poor; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, A. Shirk; Acting-Masters, Wm. H. Smith, John Fuller, Chas. DeBevoise and George J. Murray; Acting-Master's Mates, E. Pavys, E. S. D. Howland, John Boyle, V. W. Jones and T. W. Jones; Marine Corps: Second-Lieutenant, R. S. Collum; Boatswain, J. A. Briscoe. Steamer San Jacinto. Commander, Wm. Ronckendorff; Lieutenant-Commander, Ralph Chandler; Assistant Surgeon, I. W. Bragg; Paymaster, Cramer Burt; Marine Officers, Capt. J. Schermerhorn; Second-Lieutenant, L. W. Powell; Acting-Masters, D. G. McRitchie, H. J. Coop and John Baker, Acting-Master's Mates, H. H Fuller, H. T. Keene, J. D. Weed and T. C. Jones; Engineers: Chief, Mortimer Kellogg; Assistants, H. S. Davids, H. C. McIlvaine, Edwin Wells, H. W. Scott, Edmund Lincoln and N. P. Towne; Boatswain, John Marley; Acting-Gunner, C. A
William Morris (search for this): chapter 38
lunteer-Lieutenant, Edward Cavendy; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Thomas Welsh; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. H. Roberts; Acting-Masters, O. Thatcher and Theo. Werlhop; Acting-Master's Mates, T. J. Pray, M. W. Stone and N. W, Wait. Sloop-of-war Dale. Acting-Master, J. O. Barclay; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, F. B. Lawson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, R. B. Rodney; Acting-Master, B. F. Cook; Acting-Ensigns, J. A. Denman and J. T. Mendall; Acting-Master's Mates, D. C. Kiersted, M. Jackson and Wm. Morris. Steamer Magnolia. Acting-Master, Chas. Potter; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, E. D. G. Smith; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, W. J. Coite; Acting-Masters, Francis Burgess and Alex. Wallace; Acting-Master's Mates, David Scyler, Peter McGuire and O. Sundstrom; Engineers, Edward Eldridge, E. D. Leavitt, Jr., and R. H. Shultis. Steamer Stars and Stripes. Acting-Master, C. L. Willcombe; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Benj. Marshall; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. J. Pratt; Acting-Masters, L. W.
F. W. Partridge (search for this): chapter 38
T. W. Meckley Acting-Assistant Paymaster, A. M. Stewart; Acting-Masters, Lewis West and J. P. Carr; Acting-Ensigns, H. G. McKenna and N. W. Rathbone; Acting-Master's Mates, Le Grand B. Brigham, W. A. Byrnes and F. E. Brecht; Engineers, F. A. Bremen, I. B. Hewett, S. D. Loring, O. B. Mills and James Mollineaux. Steamer Fort Henry. Acting-Lieutenant, Edward Y. McCauley; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Joseph Stevens; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Daniel Whalen; Acting-Masters, R. B. Smith, F. W. Partridge and Geo. Leinas; Acting-Ensign, Geo. W. Bogue; Acting-Master's Mates, John Hancock, W. J. Haddock and W. E. Rice; Engineers, F. H. Fletcher, James Ward and Chas. Minnerly. Steamer Huntsville. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Wm. C. Rogers, Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. J. Sweet; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. M. Hart; Acting-Masters, T. R. Harris, J. H. Platt and G. A. Smith; Acting-Master's Mates, E. B. J. Singleton, Charles Labden and C. R. Scoffin; Engineers. J. L. Parry, N. N. Buc
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